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Computer Science or Microsoft Cerified 2003???

 
 
Confused
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Posts: n/a
 
      04-11-2004
Dear All -

I have been down the long road studying for my MCSE 2000.
After learning, studying and accomplishing this task I am
MCSE 2000 certified.

I am currently working as an OU Admin/HelpDesk for a large
corporation. I am now faced with a few decisions as my
position at work has no room to grow.
1) Goto to college to obtain my BS in Computer Science or
2) Continue to study for other Microsoft Certifications.

I am looking for you input on the following:
if obtain the MCSA 2000 certification (by completing 70-
21 and then following up with the upgrade of the MCSE
2003 (70-292 and 70-296) would this provide a better
opportunity to move into a Systems Admin position. Or
obtaining my B.S in Computer Science would?

Any feedback would be grateful.

Thank you very much in advance,
Confused in Florida
 
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DalePres
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      04-11-2004
Confused,

If there is any way humanly possible, stop everything you're doing in your
life, go to college, then worry about more certifications. Microsoft
certifications are great tools for learning and to help set you apart from
your peers when you're job hunting, but of the two, the most valuable asset
will always be the degree.

That statement will probably start some debate here, so let me be as clear
as I can. When it comes to knowing how to do the job and be productive in
the workplace, the certifications are much more valuable than the degree.
But when it comes to getting the interview so that you can sell your skills
in the workplace, the degree is more valuable.

With the high unemployment rate in the industry today, and the number of
colleges cranking out degrees in IT related fields, you will still face
stiff competition to even get an interview. And that's where the
certifications come in - to set you apart from the other degreed candidates.

Even if you get lucky and get a great job with no degree, jobs don't last
forever these days and you'll be facing that challenge every few years for
your entire working career. I have had many great jobs and have a great job
now based on my professional skill and certifications. I don't have a
degree, and every time I have to look for a job it gets tougher and tougher.

It took me 4 months of unemployment to start getting interviews this time
around. When I finally got some interviews, I got job offers from every one
of them, so I am very sure that the only thing that kept me unemployed for 4
months was not being able to get an interview. I couldn't get interviews
because I couldn't float to the top of the stacks and stacks of resumes with
"Graduated University of Whatever Podunk Town, BSc, Computer Science" on
them.

Another reason for getting your degree first is overcoming the proverbial
glass ceiling. I have peaked at middle management. It is probably as high
as I will go in my career. I am 48 years old now and have another 20 years
of work. If you're still college age, you'll have your degree and have
years of experience before I retire. By that time it is more likely that
I'll be working for you, with your degree, than it is that you'll be working
for me, without a degree.

But then again, at 48 years of age, I have enrolled in school starting this
summer to go back and finish my degree. So maybe you will be working for me
afterall.

Clear enough? Go to school!!!

Dale

"Confused" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:1b50301c41fdf$f8c562b0$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Dear All -
>
> I have been down the long road studying for my MCSE 2000.
> After learning, studying and accomplishing this task I am
> MCSE 2000 certified.
>
> I am currently working as an OU Admin/HelpDesk for a large
> corporation. I am now faced with a few decisions as my
> position at work has no room to grow.
> 1) Goto to college to obtain my BS in Computer Science or
> 2) Continue to study for other Microsoft Certifications.
>
> I am looking for you input on the following:
> if obtain the MCSA 2000 certification (by completing 70-
> 21 and then following up with the upgrade of the MCSE
> 2003 (70-292 and 70-296) would this provide a better
> opportunity to move into a Systems Admin position. Or
> obtaining my B.S in Computer Science would?
>
> Any feedback would be grateful.
>
> Thank you very much in advance,
> Confused in Florida



 
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Neil
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Posts: n/a
 
      04-11-2004
"Confused" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
news:1b50301c41fdf$f8c562b0$(E-Mail Removed):

> I am looking for you input on the following:
> if obtain the MCSA 2000 certification (by completing 70-
> 21 and then following up with the upgrade of the MCSE
> 2003 (70-292 and 70-296) would this provide a better
> opportunity to move into a Systems Admin position. Or
> obtaining my B.S in Computer Science would?


Following the MCSE2003 track is niether good nor bad but it is definitely
Microsoft. Does your organisation use "Absolutely" nothing but MS? probably
not. I'm not going to advocate the B.S. either, but I do believe that this
will be more vendor neutral. <grin>

look at what else your org is using. Cisco? Citrix? Oracle? *nix? perhaps
this is where you might look for additional certs. What do you like working
with? Database? Routers/networking? OS admin? maybe programming? Find
something you love to do, get somebody to pay you for it and you will never
work a day in your life. corny, but true...

--
Neil
"you'd do what, to who, for how many biscuits?"
 
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Neil
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-11-2004
"DalePres" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
news:O1AwoC$(E-Mail Removed):

> But then again, at 48 years of age, I have enrolled in school starting
> this summer to go back and finish my degree. So maybe you will be
> working for me afterall.
>


go get 'em Dale! I hope to one day as well...

--
Neil
"you'd do what, to who, for how many biscuits?"
 
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TechGeekPro
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2004
You sound like my dad!

--
I may not be fully certified, but I am fully certifiable.

"DalePres" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:O1AwoC$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Confused,
>
> If there is any way humanly possible, stop everything you're doing in your
> life, go to college, then worry about more certifications. Microsoft
> certifications are great tools for learning and to help set you apart from
> your peers when you're job hunting, but of the two, the most valuable

asset
> will always be the degree.
>
> That statement will probably start some debate here, so let me be as clear
> as I can. When it comes to knowing how to do the job and be productive in
> the workplace, the certifications are much more valuable than the degree.
> But when it comes to getting the interview so that you can sell your

skills
> in the workplace, the degree is more valuable.
>
> With the high unemployment rate in the industry today, and the number of
> colleges cranking out degrees in IT related fields, you will still face
> stiff competition to even get an interview. And that's where the
> certifications come in - to set you apart from the other degreed

candidates.
>
> Even if you get lucky and get a great job with no degree, jobs don't last
> forever these days and you'll be facing that challenge every few years for
> your entire working career. I have had many great jobs and have a great

job
> now based on my professional skill and certifications. I don't have a
> degree, and every time I have to look for a job it gets tougher and

tougher.
>
> It took me 4 months of unemployment to start getting interviews this time
> around. When I finally got some interviews, I got job offers from every

one
> of them, so I am very sure that the only thing that kept me unemployed for

4
> months was not being able to get an interview. I couldn't get interviews
> because I couldn't float to the top of the stacks and stacks of resumes

with
> "Graduated University of Whatever Podunk Town, BSc, Computer Science" on
> them.
>
> Another reason for getting your degree first is overcoming the proverbial
> glass ceiling. I have peaked at middle management. It is probably as

high
> as I will go in my career. I am 48 years old now and have another 20

years
> of work. If you're still college age, you'll have your degree and have
> years of experience before I retire. By that time it is more likely that
> I'll be working for you, with your degree, than it is that you'll be

working
> for me, without a degree.
>
> But then again, at 48 years of age, I have enrolled in school starting

this
> summer to go back and finish my degree. So maybe you will be working for

me
> afterall.
>
> Clear enough? Go to school!!!
>
> Dale
>
> "Confused" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:1b50301c41fdf$f8c562b0$(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Dear All -
> >
> > I have been down the long road studying for my MCSE 2000.
> > After learning, studying and accomplishing this task I am
> > MCSE 2000 certified.
> >
> > I am currently working as an OU Admin/HelpDesk for a large
> > corporation. I am now faced with a few decisions as my
> > position at work has no room to grow.
> > 1) Goto to college to obtain my BS in Computer Science or
> > 2) Continue to study for other Microsoft Certifications.
> >
> > I am looking for you input on the following:
> > if obtain the MCSA 2000 certification (by completing 70-
> > 21 and then following up with the upgrade of the MCSE
> > 2003 (70-292 and 70-296) would this provide a better
> > opportunity to move into a Systems Admin position. Or
> > obtaining my B.S in Computer Science would?
> >
> > Any feedback would be grateful.
> >
> > Thank you very much in advance,
> > Confused in Florida

>
>



 
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Neil
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2004
"TechGeekPro" <%username%@yahoo.com> wrote in
news:(E-Mail Removed):

> You sound like my dad!
>


I hope your homework is done...

(cripes I hate the young ones...)


--
Neil
"you'd do what, to who, for how many biscuits?"
 
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SJ
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2004
Good questions.

Short answer. Go to college and get a degree.

Long answer. If you have the option, a college degree will always be
more valuable than a certifcation in the long run.

From experience I know that both certifications and degrees open
doors. Also in different times, the lack of either certifications or
degrees close doors.

I was too smart (read "not so bright") to go to college when I
finished high school. The lack of an education threatened to keep me
in the lower middle class for my lifetime. I ultimately turned around
and earned an A.S in Microcomputer Technology, a BS in Resource
Management, and a Masters in Human Relations. This didn't happen over
night, but slowly over a fifteen year period.

In the last six or seven years, I've been on the certification running
mill. It never quits. Worse, certifications expire. Thankfully
degrees never expire.

There have been times when degrees didn't matter. As long as you
could do the job and had the spirit they were seeking, you were in.
Oftentimes, certs helped get the interview when degrees were absent.

Not too long ago, the tech industry crashed. I was lucky enough to do
well through that period even though I changed jobs a couple of times.
Certs were OK, but degrees got me the interviews.

If you have the option to pursue a degree (not everyone does), than I
say do it.

If not, then floating some resumes with your certs and support
experience (assuming you have a least one year of experience) may give
you some insight into what companies around you are looking for. It
also may just generate some interviews.

SJ
MCSE, MCDBA, MCSD....

"Confused" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:<1b50301c41fdf$f8c562b0$(E-Mail Removed)>...
> Dear All -
>
> I have been down the long road studying for my MCSE 2000.
> After learning, studying and accomplishing this task I am
> MCSE 2000 certified.
>
> I am currently working as an OU Admin/HelpDesk for a large
> corporation. I am now faced with a few decisions as my
> position at work has no room to grow.
> 1) Goto to college to obtain my BS in Computer Science or
> 2) Continue to study for other Microsoft Certifications.
>
> I am looking for you input on the following:
> if obtain the MCSA 2000 certification (by completing 70-
> 21 and then following up with the upgrade of the MCSE
> 2003 (70-292 and 70-296) would this provide a better
> opportunity to move into a Systems Admin position. Or
> obtaining my B.S in Computer Science would?
>
> Any feedback would be grateful.
>
> Thank you very much in advance,
> Confused in Florida

 
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Jim
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2004
I've always recommended a degree over certifications. The certifications
are useful, but you will be competing with many who have both a degree and
certs. A cert is good for a couple of years. However, an education lasts a
lifetime. If you would have posed this question in the late 90's, many may
have recommended to opt for the cert as the job market was booming. Reality
has finally set in. There is a stigma attached to most employees in a
professional environment without a degree. Your educational background
defines who you are.


"Confused" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:1b50301c41fdf$f8c562b0$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Dear All -
>
> I have been down the long road studying for my MCSE 2000.
> After learning, studying and accomplishing this task I am
> MCSE 2000 certified.
>
> I am currently working as an OU Admin/HelpDesk for a large
> corporation. I am now faced with a few decisions as my
> position at work has no room to grow.
> 1) Goto to college to obtain my BS in Computer Science or
> 2) Continue to study for other Microsoft Certifications.
>
> I am looking for you input on the following:
> if obtain the MCSA 2000 certification (by completing 70-
> 21 and then following up with the upgrade of the MCSE
> 2003 (70-292 and 70-296) would this provide a better
> opportunity to move into a Systems Admin position. Or
> obtaining my B.S in Computer Science would?
>
> Any feedback would be grateful.
>
> Thank you very much in advance,
> Confused in Florida



 
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TK
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2004
If you want to stay in IT (at the non-managerial level)
don't bother with a BSc. It's hugely expensive and it
won't help you on the ladder if you want to stay in techie
positions. I'm hella-smarter than most the people here at
work with degrees.
Think about this... let's say it costs you $50,000 to get
your degree. Let's guess that you get a $5000/yr raise
for said degree. That means, it'd take you 10 years
(assuming you pay no interest on that $50,000) just to
break even.
If you want to go into management eventually, I'd say work
on your degree in your spare time at night. In 10 years,
you'll be done your degree with virtually no cost and by
that time you'll have the experience in the industry to
climb the ladder.

>-----Original Message-----
>Dear All -
>
>I have been down the long road studying for my MCSE

2000.
>After learning, studying and accomplishing this task I am
>MCSE 2000 certified.
>
>I am currently working as an OU Admin/HelpDesk for a

large
>corporation. I am now faced with a few decisions as my
>position at work has no room to grow.
>1) Goto to college to obtain my BS in Computer Science or
>2) Continue to study for other Microsoft Certifications.
>
>I am looking for you input on the following:
> if obtain the MCSA 2000 certification (by completing 70-
>21 and then following up with the upgrade of the MCSE
>2003 (70-292 and 70-296) would this provide a better
>opportunity to move into a Systems Admin position. Or
>obtaining my B.S in Computer Science would?
>
>Any feedback would be grateful.
>
>Thank you very much in advance,
>Confused in Florida
>.
>

 
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Neil
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2004
"TK" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in news:18b3301c420cd
$fd3e7590$(E-Mail Removed):

> I'm hella-smarter than most the people here at
> work with degrees.


think much of yourself?

20 different certs in my pocket and I'm hoping to go back one day and get
the degree...

--
Neil
"you'd do what, to who, for how many biscuits?"
 
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