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Log off users by the server

 
 
Imad
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-09-2004
Is there any possibility to force the users to log off from
the clients computer by using the active directory service
by applying a group policy or without that?

Many thanks,
Imad
 
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Marko
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-10-2004


----- Imad wrote: -----

Is there any possibility to force the users to log off from
the clients computer by using the active directory service


Yes. Yes there is. Tremendous possibility.


Many thanks,
Imad


No problems.




Oh, you want me to tell you how?

Start Windows. Press F1.

Now read.
 
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Herb Martin
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-11-2004
On a user account's properties there are settings for Logon hours.

This is not a dynamic setting though where you can just "hit it" and
expect them to logoff.

It also doesn't (typically) force them to logout of their workstation, just
to
logoff from network servers.

--
Herb Martin
"Imad" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:d52c01c3ef1a$aae728d0$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Is there any possibility to force the users to log off from
> the clients computer by using the active directory service
> by applying a group policy or without that?
>
> Many thanks,
> Imad



 
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Marko
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-12-2004


----- Herb Martin wrote: -----


Hello Herb

I don't mind helping people.

I have one condition: They must appear to have
at least tried to help themselves.

Imad is not such a person.

If he has ever ventured into account management,
he would have noticed the Logon Hours and the Logon
To options for defining hours and workstation access
for a user. Somebody who has started Windows Server
administration in the last day or so may be the exception
to this. Otherwise, they are driving Windows with their
eyes shut.

Further, my advice to press F1 is spot on. In the process
of looking through the help files, he would quickly discover
Search. If you type "Logon Hours" into the search, it comes
back with 13 results. I know this because I tried it on my
Win2K server. The first thing to come up on Net User
commands actually solves his problem.

A search on User Logon brings up 276 possibilities. Some of
these on "account management" (another good search topic)
are quite relevant to the same problem.

Pretty soon, he would be likely to discover policies and the one
specifically relating to logging off users when their hours expire.


If this guy worked for me, I would do the same thing. I would
never just give him the answer to such a basic, mundane task.

"Catch a fish for a man and he will eat for one day.
Teach him to fish, and he will learn to feed himself"

So why spoon feed people who would obviously benefit from
learning how to solve their own problems?
 
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Imad
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-12-2004

Dear Marko,

I agree with you completely... but you don't know why I
asked in this way.

It is my favorite way to press f1 and I'm always use this
way, but I was in a special environment which there were
not windows server but windows xp and I have been asked a
question which I know that the answer is NO but I wanted to
be sure about my answer with very short time...

I do know well about the log OFF & ON houres but I didn't
mean that. The question I have asked by someone if there is
any possibility to FORCE a user while he or she uses his or
her domain user account(like when they are currently
working on some application) to be logged off.
I don't want to use the logg off and on hours, I am fully
aware about it.

Hope you get my specific question.

Best Regards,
Imad





>-----Original Message-----
>
>
> ----- Herb Martin wrote: -----
>
>
>Hello Herb
>
>I don't mind helping people.
>
>I have one condition: They must appear to have
>at least tried to help themselves.
>
>Imad is not such a person.
>
>If he has ever ventured into account management,
>he would have noticed the Logon Hours and the Logon
>To options for defining hours and workstation access
>for a user. Somebody who has started Windows Server
>administration in the last day or so may be the exception
>to this. Otherwise, they are driving Windows with their
>eyes shut.
>
>Further, my advice to press F1 is spot on. In the process
>of looking through the help files, he would quickly discover
>Search. If you type "Logon Hours" into the search, it comes
>back with 13 results. I know this because I tried it on my
>Win2K server. The first thing to come up on Net User
>commands actually solves his problem.
>
>A search on User Logon brings up 276 possibilities. Some of
>these on "account management" (another good search topic)
>are quite relevant to the same problem.
>
>Pretty soon, he would be likely to discover policies and

the one
>specifically relating to logging off users when their

hours expire.
>
>
>If this guy worked for me, I would do the same thing. I would
>never just give him the answer to such a basic, mundane task.
>
>"Catch a fish for a man and he will eat for one day.
>Teach him to fish, and he will learn to feed himself"
>
>So why spoon feed people who would obviously benefit from
>learning how to solve their own problems?
>.
>

 
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LnkWizard
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-12-2004
I ran a SEARCH through the Microsoft Knowledgebase
(HINT: this is a good place to search for answers), and
it looks like it the logoff can be run as a script by the
Domain Admin.

I suggest the you look up the complete answer there.

A suggested search phrase would be "force user logoff" and work from there.

--
Alan Gregersen
"He who does not test himself is worthless indeed"

"Imad" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:f52001c3f163$e6235f40$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> Dear Marko,
>
> I agree with you completely... but you don't know why I
> asked in this way.
>
> It is my favorite way to press f1 and I'm always use this
> way, but I was in a special environment which there were
> not windows server but windows xp and I have been asked a
> question which I know that the answer is NO but I wanted to
> be sure about my answer with very short time...
>
> I do know well about the log OFF & ON houres but I didn't
> mean that. The question I have asked by someone if there is
> any possibility to FORCE a user while he or she uses his or
> her domain user account(like when they are currently
> working on some application) to be logged off.
> I don't want to use the logg off and on hours, I am fully
> aware about it.
>
> Hope you get my specific question.
>
> Best Regards,
> Imad
>
>
>
>
>
> >-----Original Message-----
> >
> >
> > ----- Herb Martin wrote: -----
> >
> >
> >Hello Herb
> >
> >I don't mind helping people.
> >
> >I have one condition: They must appear to have
> >at least tried to help themselves.
> >
> >Imad is not such a person.
> >
> >If he has ever ventured into account management,
> >he would have noticed the Logon Hours and the Logon
> >To options for defining hours and workstation access
> >for a user. Somebody who has started Windows Server
> >administration in the last day or so may be the exception
> >to this. Otherwise, they are driving Windows with their
> >eyes shut.
> >
> >Further, my advice to press F1 is spot on. In the process
> >of looking through the help files, he would quickly discover
> >Search. If you type "Logon Hours" into the search, it comes
> >back with 13 results. I know this because I tried it on my
> >Win2K server. The first thing to come up on Net User
> >commands actually solves his problem.
> >
> >A search on User Logon brings up 276 possibilities. Some of
> >these on "account management" (another good search topic)
> >are quite relevant to the same problem.
> >
> >Pretty soon, he would be likely to discover policies and

> the one
> >specifically relating to logging off users when their

> hours expire.
> >
> >
> >If this guy worked for me, I would do the same thing. I would
> >never just give him the answer to such a basic, mundane task.
> >
> >"Catch a fish for a man and he will eat for one day.
> >Teach him to fish, and he will learn to feed himself"
> >
> >So why spoon feed people who would obviously benefit from
> >learning how to solve their own problems?
> >.
> >



 
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Herb Martin
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-12-2004
Since I didn't respond to your message or criticize your (lack of a direct)
answer,
and you chose to respond to mine with an explanation, may I presume you
disapprove
of MY CHOICE to just help the guy?

I actually believed that you missed his point -- he clarified that in
another response so
this is confirmed.

My response might have included the "answer" even if I had not believed his
question
to be misinterpreted. Personally I have no problem with "RTFM" as long as
someone
will just tell me which manual and preferable which page if they bother to
give such
sometimes gratuitous advice. (It's gratuitous because they fools that won't
try help will
ignore it and those that don't know better, just don't know better and
deserve some
real help AND a lesson on how to help themselves.)

If you read enough of my posts you will find several patterns: Even when I
suggest a
search, I almost always include either SOME help, or SOME indication of
where or
what to search. Usually, I will see and respond to the ACTUAL question
while others
my get sidetracked answering -- or not answering -- a question that wasn't
asked.

You will also notice that I don't particularly suffer the "know it alls who
don't." I usually
have much less patience with such tyros than with the actual newbies who are
trying to
learn and not look smart.

Of course, in this case, I actually mentioned the answer to the possible
question to
eliminate that from the discussion in order to move on to the actual (or at
least at that
time, apparent) question.


--
Herb Martin
"Marko" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>
> ----- Herb Martin wrote: -----
>
>
> Hello Herb
>
> I don't mind helping people.
>
> I have one condition: They must appear to have
> at least tried to help themselves.
>
> Imad is not such a person.
>
> If he has ever ventured into account management,
> he would have noticed the Logon Hours and the Logon
> To options for defining hours and workstation access
> for a user. Somebody who has started Windows Server
> administration in the last day or so may be the exception
> to this. Otherwise, they are driving Windows with their
> eyes shut.
>
> Further, my advice to press F1 is spot on. In the process
> of looking through the help files, he would quickly discover
> Search. If you type "Logon Hours" into the search, it comes
> back with 13 results. I know this because I tried it on my
> Win2K server. The first thing to come up on Net User
> commands actually solves his problem.
>
> A search on User Logon brings up 276 possibilities. Some of
> these on "account management" (another good search topic)
> are quite relevant to the same problem.
>
> Pretty soon, he would be likely to discover policies and the one
> specifically relating to logging off users when their hours expire.
>
>
> If this guy worked for me, I would do the same thing. I would
> never just give him the answer to such a basic, mundane task.
>
> "Catch a fish for a man and he will eat for one day.
> Teach him to fish, and he will learn to feed himself"
>
> So why spoon feed people who would obviously benefit from
> learning how to solve their own problems?



 
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Marko
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-13-2004


----- Imad wrote: -----

The question I have asked by someone if there is
any possibility to FORCE a user while he or she uses his or
her domain user account(like when they are currently
working on some application) to be logged off.


Imad, please read this:

http://support.microsoft.com/default...roduct=win2000


If you read, implement, and then still have issues,
come back and ask more specific questions. OK?

 
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Dan
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-13-2004
If you're running Windows 2000, the shutdown.exe utility
gives you the ability to shut down remote or local
machines from the command prompt. Have a look at the
following link for further details.

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-
us;317371

>-----Original Message-----
>
>Dear Marko,
>
>I agree with you completely... but you don't know why I
>asked in this way.
>
>It is my favorite way to press f1 and I'm always use this
>way, but I was in a special environment which there were
>not windows server but windows xp and I have been asked a
>question which I know that the answer is NO but I wanted

to
> be sure about my answer with very short time...
>
>I do know well about the log OFF & ON houres but I didn't
>mean that. The question I have asked by someone if there

is
>any possibility to FORCE a user while he or she uses his

or
>her domain user account(like when they are currently
>working on some application) to be logged off.
>I don't want to use the logg off and on hours, I am fully
>aware about it.
>
>Hope you get my specific question.
>
>Best Regards,
>Imad
>
>
>
>
>
>>-----Original Message-----
>>
>>
>> ----- Herb Martin wrote: -----
>>
>>
>>Hello Herb
>>
>>I don't mind helping people.
>>
>>I have one condition: They must appear to have
>>at least tried to help themselves.
>>
>>Imad is not such a person.
>>
>>If he has ever ventured into account management,
>>he would have noticed the Logon Hours and the Logon
>>To options for defining hours and workstation access
>>for a user. Somebody who has started Windows Server
>>administration in the last day or so may be the

exception
>>to this. Otherwise, they are driving Windows with

their
>>eyes shut.
>>
>>Further, my advice to press F1 is spot on. In the

process
>>of looking through the help files, he would quickly

discover
>>Search. If you type "Logon Hours" into the search, it

comes
>>back with 13 results. I know this because I tried it

on my
>>Win2K server. The first thing to come up on Net User
>>commands actually solves his problem.
>>
>>A search on User Logon brings up 276 possibilities.

Some of
>>these on "account management" (another good search

topic)
>>are quite relevant to the same problem.
>>
>>Pretty soon, he would be likely to discover policies and

>the one
>>specifically relating to logging off users when their

>hours expire.
>>
>>
>>If this guy worked for me, I would do the same thing.

I would
>>never just give him the answer to such a basic, mundane

task.
>>
>>"Catch a fish for a man and he will eat for one day.
>>Teach him to fish, and he will learn to feed himself"
>>
>>So why spoon feed people who would obviously benefit

from
>>learning how to solve their own problems?
>>.
>>

>.
>

 
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