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Study Time?

 
 
NeoNerd
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      07-29-2003
Hey

How much time should I put in to studying for my MCSA (I
have 3 months before I do the first exam).

I have a full time job (in IT)and a family, how many hours
a day do you think I should put in to study?




 
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Grok
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      07-29-2003
IMHO, the sybex/osborne books are the worst I've seen. The exam
software is buggy, which I could overlook if not for the questions
themselves being horribly written. Many of the answers are just plain
wrong. Their customer support doesn't respond to emails requesting
the errata, and the actual errata does not include patches for the
testing software.

Your experiences may vary.


On Tue, 29 Jul 2003 09:58:08 -0500, "Diana K Brown"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Time is up to you and your needs. Set a goal for each step. Here is what I
>do for self study.
>It really depends on the person. Some learn more by reading, others by
>hearing, and others by doing.
>
>
>
>The best I have found for most people is to have a multiple approach, which
>contains most or all variables.
>
>
>
>1. Read a good study guide book. I like Sybex, Osbourne books (must
>purchase) and then MS Resource Kit books and Technet, which are free online
>on MS website. Check out your local library or online or at the local
>bookstore and look over the different books for your study subject. I
>almost always buy mine at 75% Off Bookstores for $5!! Usually something
>which has the test objectives, clearly explains those objectives (how-to)
>with examples, labs or assignments and real world scenarios are the best
>overall. You may want something simple and straight-forward. Depends on
>how you best take in info.


[snip]
 
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Diana K Brown
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-30-2003
Which underscores the need to use several different resources. I always use
technet and MS resource kit books online to verify all answers when studying
and taking practice exams.

"Grok" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> IMHO, the sybex/osborne books are the worst I've seen. The exam
> software is buggy, which I could overlook if not for the questions
> themselves being horribly written. Many of the answers are just plain
> wrong. Their customer support doesn't respond to emails requesting
> the errata, and the actual errata does not include patches for the
> testing software.
>
> Your experiences may vary.
>
>
> On Tue, 29 Jul 2003 09:58:08 -0500, "Diana K Brown"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >Time is up to you and your needs. Set a goal for each step. Here is

what I
> >do for self study.
> >It really depends on the person. Some learn more by reading, others by
> >hearing, and others by doing.
> >
> >
> >
> >The best I have found for most people is to have a multiple approach,

which
> >contains most or all variables.
> >
> >
> >
> >1. Read a good study guide book. I like Sybex, Osbourne books (must
> >purchase) and then MS Resource Kit books and Technet, which are free

online
> >on MS website. Check out your local library or online or at the local
> >bookstore and look over the different books for your study subject. I
> >almost always buy mine at 75% Off Bookstores for $5!! Usually something
> >which has the test objectives, clearly explains those objectives (how-to)
> >with examples, labs or assignments and real world scenarios are the best
> >overall. You may want something simple and straight-forward. Depends on
> >how you best take in info.

>
> [snip]



 
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Marko
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      08-02-2003
I notice that the advice given so far may not be what you
were looking for since it doesn't seem to answer your
question. Here is something concrete you may be able to
work with:

1/ MS Press books (designed to meet the requirements of
each exam) are divided into chapters and into lessons.
Each has a suggested time value for the reading, study,
note taking and exercises before doing the review. Most
books are around 50 hours, but this could be as little as
30 something to as much as say nearly 100 hours.

Read more than one book if you can.

2/ MS Press or similar readiness review books could be
done front to back in a day; better still over one
weekend. This is equivalent to a lot of the study guides
you can buy. No advertisements here for what they might
be.

3/ You could do a course. 3 to 5 days and lots of money.
Not enough to pass most exams: you will still need to
review or read a book or both.

4/ Resource kits and white papers from the MS site. VERY
VERY GOOD but it is hard to work out what might help in
each exam. Look at the requirements and try to filter the
good from the bad. Supplement with books and reviews and
study guides.

5/ Above all else - get some quality time with computers
trying everything out. That means a home lab.


I spent some time learning how to learn. It doesn't take
long. Things like how to study; break times, time of day,
how to organise notes, how to remember (Mega Memory course
is good) even what food to eat to help me remember and
think better. Natural drugs? Try Ginko / Biloba from the
health store. Finding out whether I would learn faster
through visual, kinetic or auditory means and then
applying this knowledge. Things like mind maps (check
Tony Buzan via google) These skills saved me a lot of
time and mean that I can still recall a lot of my notes
many months later.

I said it before but I will say again: It is around 100-
150 hours per subject to be reasonably assured that you
will pass each exam. I know some will say you could read
the book on the weekend and pass on Monday - but that
assumes you are already very experienced out in the field
and you are merely revising all that you know and possibly
filling a few small gaps in your knowledge. Same is true
for those who do a 3-5 day MOC and then pass the exam;
usually they have a lot of field experience.

So realistically, expect around 500+ hours of reading,
studying, reviewing and doing to go into making you an
MCSA! It would surpirse me if you got away with a lot
less than that and felt within yourself that you had
RETAINED the skills to do a job worthy of the credentials.


Oh - I almost forgot. You could disregard everything I
have said and say it was all too hard and download a
braindumps for the exam you wanted to pass and, assuming
it wasn't out of date, there would be enough right answers
for you to memorise over a weekend to pass the exam Monday
morning. In which case you would have a piece of paper
that you could wipe the fecal matter of your member with
since you would be an a55 farkrr

Sorry 'bout that. But nobody likes a cheat. But it is a
study method that works for some so it gets a mention.
(Usually works for those who cry poor or can't read nor
understand English)


in any case, GOOD LUCK!




 
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