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File access issue

 
 
SteveH
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-12-2008
Hello

I have recently been going through permissions in preparation for the exam,
but I am a little confused.

I am using the recommended Glenn book. He refers to resolving the kind of
issue where ‘a user calls to say he cannot access some files on his local
computer while working from home, you must determine the assigned permissions
that are on the files, usually by examining the Security tab in the file’s
Properties dialogue box. After you determine the permissions, you need to
assign the appropriate permissions based on the user’s needs’.

Then, ‘based on the above user’s symptoms, you should suspect that when the
user previously logged on to his local computer, he accessed those files on
that local computer. Now he is likely to be logged on to the domain and his
permissions do not allow him access to the local computer’s files. The user,
then, needs to log on to the computer locally (or have an administrator do
so) and grant his domain user account the permissions necessary to access the
files’.

This is quite unclear to me, mainly this line: ‘the user previously logged
on to his local computer, he accessed those files on that local computer’.

What does local computer imply? His PC at work? Or at home? And does local
computer imply a networked computer? The term ‘local’ to me implies stand
alone.

Is the author referring to the user’s PC at work which he has a user name
and password for, and that the files he is accessing on that local computer
are on that computer’s hard drive which nobody can access without the user’s
user name and password?

If he does not mean this and, in fact, means that the files are on a network
drive which he accesses via his work PC – just as the user sitting next to
him can with the same permissions - why is it that he can access them if he
is not logged on to the domain?

If I am not a member of this domain how have I been allowed to create files
and folders? And if I am a member of this domain, why would I not be able to
access it from outside?

As you can see, my exam preparations are completely foggy at the moment!!

Steve



 
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catwalker63
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-12-2008
=?Utf-8?B?U3RldmVI?= <(E-Mail Removed)> prattled
ceaselessly in news:(E-Mail Removed):

> Hello
>
> I have recently been going through permissions in preparation for the
> exam, but I am a little confused.
>
> I am using the recommended Glenn book. He refers to resolving the kind
> of issue where ‘a user calls to say he cannot access some files on
> his local computer while working from home, you must determine the
> assigned permissions that are on the files, usually by examining the
> Security tab in the file’s Properties dialogue box. After you
> determine the permissions, you need to assign the appropriate
> permissions based on the user’s needs’.
>
> Then, ‘based on the above user’s symptoms, you should suspect that
> when the user previously logged on to his local computer, he accessed
> those files on that local computer. Now he is likely to be logged on
> to the domain and his permissions do not allow him access to the local
> computer’s files. The user, then, needs to log on to the computer
> locally (or have an administrator do so) and grant his domain user
> account the permissions necessary to access the files’.
>
> This is quite unclear to me, mainly this line: ‘the user previously
> logged on to his local computer, he accessed those files on that local
> computer’.
>
> What does local computer imply? His PC at work? Or at home? And does
> local computer imply a networked computer? The term ‘local’ to me
> implies stand alone.
>
> Is the author referring to the user’s PC at work which he has a user
> name and password for, and that the files he is accessing on that
> local computer are on that computer’s hard drive which nobody can
> access without the user’s user name and password?
>
> If he does not mean this and, in fact, means that the files are on a
> network drive which he accesses via his work PC – just as the user
> sitting next to him can with the same permissions - why is it that he
> can access them if he is not logged on to the domain?
>
> If I am not a member of this domain how have I been allowed to create
> files and folders? And if I am a member of this domain, why would I
> not be able to access it from outside?
>
> As you can see, my exam preparations are completely foggy at the
> moment!!
>
> Steve
>
>
>
>


By local computer, in this context, he was likely logging in using the
local computer account. If he then logs in to the local computer using a
domain account, he may not have the same level of access. It will depend
on the local computer user account and/or domain user account group
membership and the permissions assigned to the user account and groups.
The files haven't moved.

--
Catwalker
MCNGP #43
www.mcngp.com
"Definitely not wearing any underwear."
 
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Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard Inc.]
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-12-2008
"catwalker63" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:Xns9ABB977EDE280catwalker63athotmail@207.46.2 48.16:

> =?Utf-8?B?U3RldmVI?= <(E-Mail Removed)> prattled
> ceaselessly in news:(E-Mail Removed):
>
>
> > Hello
> >
> > I have recently been going through permissions in preparation for the
> > exam, but I am a little confused.
> >
> > I am using the recommended Glenn book. He refers to resolving the kind
> > of issue where ‘a user calls to say he cannot access some files on
> > his local computer while working from home, you must determine the
> > assigned permissions that are on the files, usually by examining the
> > Security tab in the file’s Properties dialogue box. After you
> > determine the permissions, you need to assign the appropriate
> > permissions based on the user’s needs’.
> >
> > Then, ‘based on the above user’s symptoms, you should suspect that
> > when the user previously logged on to his local computer, he accessed
> > those files on that local computer. Now he is likely to be logged on
> > to the domain and his permissions do not allow him access to the local
> > computer’s files. The user, then, needs to log on to the computer
> > locally (or have an administrator do so) and grant his domain user
> > account the permissions necessary to access the files’.
> >
> > This is quite unclear to me, mainly this line: ‘the user previously
> > logged on to his local computer, he accessed those files on that local
> > computer’.
> >
> > What does local computer imply? His PC at work? Or at home? And does
> > local computer imply a networked computer? The term ‘local’ to me
> > implies stand alone.
> >
> > Is the author referring to the user’s PC at work which he has a user
> > name and password for, and that the files he is accessing on that
> > local computer are on that computer’s hard drive which nobody can
> > access without the user’s user name and password?
> >
> > If he does not mean this and, in fact, means that the files are on a
> > network drive which he accesses via his work PC – just as the user
> > sitting next to him can with the same permissions - why is it that he
> > can access them if he is not logged on to the domain?
> >
> > If I am not a member of this domain how have I been allowed to create
> > files and folders? And if I am a member of this domain, why would I
> > not be able to access it from outside?
> >
> > As you can see, my exam preparations are completely foggy at the
> > moment!!
> >
> > Steve
> >
> >
> >
> >

>
>
> By local computer, in this context, he was likely logging in using the
> local computer account. If he then logs in to the local computer using a
> domain account, he may not have the same level of access. It will depend
> on the local computer user account and/or domain user account group
> membership and the permissions assigned to the user account and groups.
> The files haven't moved.
>
> --
> Catwalker
> MCNGP #43
> www.mcngp.com
> "Definitely not wearing any underwear."
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG.
> Version: 8.0.93 / Virus Database: 270.3.0/1500 - Release Date: 6/12/2008 4:58 PM


I agree with Cat. Think of it this way: You have a laptop that you
travel around with. When you are not doing business work (i.e. domain
activities), you simply access your computer as you normally would.
However, when you access or authenticate with your company's domain, you
are doing so under a different account than that of your local computers
account. Thus you will have different permissions.

--
Michael D. Alligood, MCITP, MCTS, MCSA, MCDST, A+
The I.T. Classroom Blog - http://www.theitclassroom.com
CIO, CertGuard Incorporated - http://www.certguard.com


No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG.
Version: 8.0.93 / Virus Database: 270.3.0/1500 - Release Date: 6/12/2008
4:58 PM

 
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catwalker63
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-13-2008
"Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard Inc.]" <(E-Mail Removed)>
prattled ceaselessly in news:(E-Mail Removed):

> "catwalker63" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:Xns9ABB977EDE280catwalker63athotmail@207.46.2 48.16:
>
>>
>>
>> By local computer, in this context, he was likely logging in using
>> the local computer account. If he then logs in to the local computer
>> using a domain account, he may not have the same level of access. It
>> will depend on the local computer user account and/or domain user
>> account group membership and the permissions assigned to the user
>> account and groups. The files haven't moved.
>>

>
> I agree with Cat. Think of it this way: You have a laptop that you
> travel around with. When you are not doing business work (i.e. domain
> activities), you simply access your computer as you normally would.
> However, when you access or authenticate with your company's domain,
> you are doing so under a different account than that of your local
> computers account. Thus you will have different permissions.
>



You can also use your domain login on a laptop that's not connected to
the network. The permission set saved would still apply. Certain
restrictions apply. Bottom line: set it up several ways and try it out
-- see what happens. It's the only way.

--
Catwalker
MCNGP #43
www.mcngp.com
"Definitely not wearing any underwear."
 
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SteveH
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-13-2008
Hello

Many thanks for your helpful replies, particularly:

When you are not doing business work (i.e. domain activities), you simply
access your computer as you normally would. However, when you access or
authenticate with your company's domain, you are doing so under a different
account than that of your local computers account. Thus you will have
different permissions.

I have to think of the company as having different doors through which to
enter: if I have the wrong swipe card, I won't get in.

It is a bit confusing , though, when in the example I gave, the autors refer
to 'local computer'. They spoke of a computer (a workstation) at work, and
his home computer.

They seem to imply both.

Thanks for your posts!

Steve


 
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Kevin Attard Compagno
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-14-2008
Hi there

The word "local computer" is the key phrase here because in this context
the meaning is no longer that from the english diciontionary, but that
from an IT jargon glossary

In the context of comparing different authentication methods:

1. "Domain account" obviously refers to the permissions assigned to the
token assigner to the user when using the credentials to log on to the
domain credentials.
2. "Local computer account" refers to the permissions assigned to the
token assigned to the user when using the credentials to log on to the
specific computer being used at the time - where the login process will
compare credentials to the user database on the computer itself, rather
than referring to a domain controller. This is a completely seperate
security context and will therefore have a completely seperate set of
permissions assigned to the credentials.

Kevin

"SteveH" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed):

> Hello
>
> Many thanks for your helpful replies, particularly:
>
> When you are not doing business work (i.e. domain activities), you simply
> access your computer as you normally would. However, when you access or
> authenticate with your company's domain, you are doing so under a different
> account than that of your local computers account. Thus you will have
> different permissions.
>
> I have to think of the company as having different doors through which to
> enter: if I have the wrong swipe card, I won't get in.
>
> It is a bit confusing , though, when in the example I gave, the autors refer
> to 'local computer'. They spoke of a computer (a workstation) at work, and
> his home computer.
>
> They seem to imply both.
>
> Thanks for your posts!
>
> Steve


 
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