Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computer Certification > MCDST > Pursuing the Right Career

Reply
Thread Tools

Pursuing the Right Career

 
 
Jo
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-05-2007
Hello folks - it's been a while since I've posted here, but after passing the
70-271 in March, I hope to take my 70-272 on July 31st. My question: Does
it appear fruitful to continue an IT career when you simply suck at
troubleshooting? How does one know to stay the course or throw in the towel
?
--
Motochick
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
CBIC
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-05-2007

"Jo" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hello folks - it's been a while since I've posted here, but after passing
> the
> 70-271 in March, I hope to take my 70-272 on July 31st. My question:
> Does
> it appear fruitful to continue an IT career when you simply suck at
> troubleshooting? How does one know to stay the course or throw in the
> towel
> ?
> --
> Motochick


Troubleshooting skills come with experience. If you like what you're doing,
stick with it.


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
John R
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-05-2007

"CBIC" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:eq$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "Jo" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Hello folks - it's been a while since I've posted here, but after passing
>> the
>> 70-271 in March, I hope to take my 70-272 on July 31st. My question:
>> Does
>> it appear fruitful to continue an IT career when you simply suck at
>> troubleshooting? How does one know to stay the course or throw in the
>> towel
>> ?
>> --
>> Motochick

>
> Troubleshooting skills come with experience. If you like what you're
> doing, stick with it.
>


That is great advise. I have found that troubleshooting becomes easier with
experience because obviously you have seen things before and you know what
to look for. Education is also a great teacher. When you understand how
DNS works for example, when you start to have problems accessing servers or
domains, you can put your DNS knowledge to work to determine if it is a DNS
issue or not. Troubleshooting involves not only identifying what the
problem is, but in most cases identifying what the problem is not.
Education helps with that. With that in mind, pick up some books on the
subjects. For example, if you are responsible for helpdesk support, get
some books on MCDST, XP, Office, etc. An hour or two each night can really
help.

Good luck to you.

John R


 
Reply With Quote
 
Jo
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-05-2007
My problem is a boss who knows everything and when you can't figure it out,
he assumes you suck when it comes to troubleshooting. I have to hear the
whole story about how he analyzes things and how he got where he is today,
etc. I simply think I have a blockage when it comes to applying concepts.
He even told third party vendors that I was a "bit slow". If I don't
approach it "his way", then I'm all wrong. It gets old trying to be the
"mechanic" all the time, when all you get is flack. I can understand why the
younger generation doesn't want this job!
--
Motochick


"John R" wrote:

>
> "CBIC" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:eq$(E-Mail Removed)...
> >
> > "Jo" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >> Hello folks - it's been a while since I've posted here, but after passing
> >> the
> >> 70-271 in March, I hope to take my 70-272 on July 31st. My question:
> >> Does
> >> it appear fruitful to continue an IT career when you simply suck at
> >> troubleshooting? How does one know to stay the course or throw in the
> >> towel
> >> ?
> >> --
> >> Motochick

> >
> > Troubleshooting skills come with experience. If you like what you're
> > doing, stick with it.
> >

>
> That is great advise. I have found that troubleshooting becomes easier with
> experience because obviously you have seen things before and you know what
> to look for. Education is also a great teacher. When you understand how
> DNS works for example, when you start to have problems accessing servers or
> domains, you can put your DNS knowledge to work to determine if it is a DNS
> issue or not. Troubleshooting involves not only identifying what the
> problem is, but in most cases identifying what the problem is not.
> Education helps with that. With that in mind, pick up some books on the
> subjects. For example, if you are responsible for helpdesk support, get
> some books on MCDST, XP, Office, etc. An hour or two each night can really
> help.
>
> Good luck to you.
>
> John R
>
>
>

 
Reply With Quote
 
John R
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-05-2007

"Jo" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> My problem is a boss who knows everything and when you can't figure it
> out,
> he assumes you suck when it comes to troubleshooting. I have to hear the
> whole story about how he analyzes things and how he got where he is today,
> etc. I simply think I have a blockage when it comes to applying concepts.
> He even told third party vendors that I was a "bit slow". If I don't
> approach it "his way", then I'm all wrong. It gets old trying to be the
> "mechanic" all the time, when all you get is flack. I can understand why
> the
> younger generation doesn't want this job!
> --
> Motochick
>


I don't think you have the wrong career, I think you have the wrong
employer.

John R


 
Reply With Quote
 
CBIC
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-05-2007

"John R" <jsr^^^813@zoom^^^internet.net> wrote in message
news:%23mklp$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> I don't think you have the wrong career, I think you have the wrong
> employer.
>


Sounds like it to me too. I bet if you could work with someone else you
would feel differently. In most of my jobs I've been the only IT person on
site so I get to learn things on my own. Education and experience are
irreplaceable and I would not want to go back to starting over.


 
Reply With Quote
 
Jo
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-05-2007
I've only had this job for two years. I was working for a law firm for 17
years when after a network conversion, I was laid off. It appears as though
the more I learn, the more I seem to be a threat to people. I don't quite
get it. You bust your arse and only get treated like a moron in this field.
Then you go home each night questioning yourself and your skills, only to get
up the next morning wondering if it's all worth it - the education, the hard
work, the endless hours of research, the salary that's just peanuts. Will a
Microsoft Certification really do anything for me after all this? That's the
real question... Thanks for your posts. I'm gone.
--
Motochick


"CBIC" wrote:

>
> "John R" <jsr^^^813@zoom^^^internet.net> wrote in message
> news:%23mklp$(E-Mail Removed)...
> >
> > I don't think you have the wrong career, I think you have the wrong
> > employer.
> >

>
> Sounds like it to me too. I bet if you could work with someone else you
> would feel differently. In most of my jobs I've been the only IT person on
> site so I get to learn things on my own. Education and experience are
> irreplaceable and I would not want to go back to starting over.
>
>
>

 
Reply With Quote
 
John R
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-05-2007

"Jo" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> I've only had this job for two years. I was working for a law firm for 17
> years when after a network conversion, I was laid off. It appears as
> though
> the more I learn, the more I seem to be a threat to people. I don't quite
> get it. You bust your arse and only get treated like a moron in this
> field.
> Then you go home each night questioning yourself and your skills, only to
> get
> up the next morning wondering if it's all worth it - the education, the
> hard
> work, the endless hours of research, the salary that's just peanuts. Will
> a
> Microsoft Certification really do anything for me after all this? That's
> the
> real question... Thanks for your posts. I'm gone.
> --
> Motochick
>


All the people I've worked with always seem really appreciative of my
efforts. Yes, I do ocassionally make mistakes, we all do. How you deal
with those mistakes is how people are going to perceive you. But in your
particular situation, it doesn't sound like you are the problem.

Certifications are about verifying experience. You'd have to check your job
market against what you are making now and what you think you should be
making. I pursued certifications because my employer placed the demands on
me to do it. I work for a Microsoft Gold Certified partner, and he had
goals to meet to maintain that partnership. I don't make the kind of money
that I think I should, but I probably make more than my boss thinks I'm
worth

Two years is about the acceptable level for experience it seems. Most job
ads require one to two years experience, so it looks like you are there.
Why not test the waters out there. When you do, don't be afraid to ask up
front, "If I obtain XXXX certification, will that affect my job status or my
pay?" Ultimately, those decisions are made by individual employers, and
those that value certifications will tell you that up front with no problem.

Good luck to you.

John R


 
Reply With Quote
 
TheITGirl
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-06-2007

"John R" <jsr^^^813@zoom^^^internet.net> wrote in message
news:%(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "Jo" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> I've only had this job for two years. I was working for a law firm for
>> 17
>> years when after a network conversion, I was laid off. It appears as
>> though
>> the more I learn, the more I seem to be a threat to people. I don't
>> quite
>> get it. You bust your arse and only get treated like a moron in this
>> field.
>> Then you go home each night questioning yourself and your skills, only to
>> get
>> up the next morning wondering if it's all worth it - the education, the
>> hard
>> work, the endless hours of research, the salary that's just peanuts.
>> Will a
>> Microsoft Certification really do anything for me after all this? That's
>> the
>> real question... Thanks for your posts. I'm gone.
>> --
>> Motochick
>>

>
> All the people I've worked with always seem really appreciative of my
> efforts. Yes, I do ocassionally make mistakes, we all do. How you deal
> with those mistakes is how people are going to perceive you. But in your
> particular situation, it doesn't sound like you are the problem.
>
> Certifications are about verifying experience. You'd have to check your
> job market against what you are making now and what you think you should
> be making. I pursued certifications because my employer placed the
> demands on me to do it. I work for a Microsoft Gold Certified partner,
> and he had goals to meet to maintain that partnership. I don't make the
> kind of money that I think I should, but I probably make more than my boss
> thinks I'm worth
>
> Two years is about the acceptable level for experience it seems. Most job
> ads require one to two years experience, so it looks like you are there.
> Why not test the waters out there. When you do, don't be afraid to ask up
> front, "If I obtain XXXX certification, will that affect my job status or
> my pay?" Ultimately, those decisions are made by individual employers,
> and those that value certifications will tell you that up front with no
> problem.
>
> Good luck to you.
>
> John R
>

Hi Motochick!

I too worked in a law firm for several years before starting a new career in
IT! Like you I still have loads to learn, but I am enjoying it immensely.
I have to admit I didn't get any extra pay for passing my MCDST, but it has
given me a sense of achievement.

I would advise you to keep your eyes peeled for other job opportunities. In
the meantime, please keep your chin up and don't let your current boss erode
your confidence - he sounds like a real a***hole and probably sees you as a
threat because you are a fast learner!

Remember - YOU CAN DO IT!

Good luck with the 272 exam

IT Girl MCDST


 
Reply With Quote
 
djpimpdaddy
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-09-2007
On Jul 5, 1:36 pm, Jo <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> My problem is a boss who knows everything and when you can't figure it out,
> he assumes you suck when it comes to troubleshooting. I have to hear the
> whole story about how he analyzes things and how he got where he is today,
> etc. I simply think I have a blockage when it comes to applying concepts.
> He even told third party vendors that I was a "bit slow". If I don't
> approach it "his way", then I'm all wrong. It gets old trying to be the
> "mechanic" all the time, when all you get is flack. I can understand why the
> younger generation doesn't want this job!
> --
> Motochick
>
>
>
> "John R" wrote:
>
> > "CBIC" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >news:eq$(E-Mail Removed)...

>
> > > "Jo" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > >news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > >> Hello folks - it's been a while since I've posted here, but after passing
> > >> the
> > >> 70-271 in March, I hope to take my 70-272 on July 31st. My question:
> > >> Does
> > >> it appear fruitful to continue an IT career when you simply suck at
> > >> troubleshooting? How does one know to stay the course or throw in the
> > >> towel
> > >> ?
> > >> --
> > >> Motochick

>
> > > Troubleshooting skills come with experience. If you like what you're
> > > doing, stick with it.

>
> > That is great advise. I have found that troubleshooting becomes easier with
> > experience because obviously you have seen things before and you know what
> > to look for. Education is also a great teacher. When you understand how
> > DNS works for example, when you start to have problems accessing servers or
> > domains, you can put your DNS knowledge to work to determine if it is a DNS
> > issue or not. Troubleshooting involves not only identifying what the
> > problem is, but in most cases identifying what the problem is not.
> > Education helps with that. With that in mind, pick up some books on the
> > subjects. For example, if you are responsible for helpdesk support, get
> > some books on MCDST, XP, Office, etc. An hour or two each night can really
> > help.

>
> > Good luck to you.

>
> > John R- Hide quoted text -

>
> - Show quoted text -


Stop working in such a draining environment. Do yourself a favor and
get a new job. Any employer that is not willing to help their
employees learn to be better employees is just plain stupid. Part of
learning is good old fashion patience. At my work, they don't pay me
to get certified, but they do allow me to study during downtime. Also,
problems at my work are viewed as learning experiences. My boss knows
that I am glad to show him things so he can learn just as much as I am
from him. This way we never get impatient. Now I do suppose that if I
was to have to show him the same procedure every singel day for a
month, then, and only then, would I get impatient. That would show a
lack of desire to learn.

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Excellent resources for pursuing Computer Science or other Careers &a liitle extra eternal Cisco 0 05-05-2009 05:50 PM
Are you pursuing CCNA/CCDA/CCDP/CCIE/CCVP/CCNP/CCSP? CiscoCertifications Facebook Group Fleckz328 Cisco 0 02-05-2009 07:30 PM
Pursuing MCSE off of old exams Rebecca MCSE 1 12-19-2008 05:14 PM
Is MCSE worth pursuing? Steve Young Digital Photography 200 11-28-2003 11:12 PM
Help!!! Need advice in pursuing a career in Web Design.......... Linwood HTML 9 10-06-2003 09:19 PM



Advertisments