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USB Flash Drive

 
 
Keith nuttle
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      12-28-2008
Now that USB Flash Drives are quite cheap, ($19 for 16g at Fry's) they
are looking more attractive as backup.

I have a laptop and desktop. They both run Windows XP and are connected
in a wireless lan. I keep the files on both computers synced with
Syncback, so have two copies of all of my files.

Would a 16g or 32g USB Flash Drive provide reliable third backup?

What is their lifetime? in hours, accesses, or whatever.
 
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Marco Tedaldi
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      12-28-2008
Keith nuttle schrieb:
> Now that USB Flash Drives are quite cheap, ($19 for 16g at Fry's) they
> are looking more attractive as backup.
>
> I have a laptop and desktop. They both run Windows XP and are connected
> in a wireless lan. I keep the files on both computers synced with
> Syncback, so have two copies of all of my files.
>
> Would a 16g or 32g USB Flash Drive provide reliable third backup?
>
> What is their lifetime? in hours, accesses, or whatever.


The are quite reliable IF they are not faked stuff...

There where several people testing the drives with millions of write
accesses to the same logical location. As long as you're not damaging
these thins mechanically, you should be quite save. I don't know about
long term stability, but it should be several years at least.

For sure it is not a bad Idea as additional backup, but 16G is not
really a lot for a collection of digital images

kruemi

--
Dimage A2, Agfa isolette
http://flickr.com/photos/kruemi
And a cool timekiller: http://www.starpirates.net/register.php?referer=9708
 
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23DAVID1
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      12-29-2008
Be careful when buying cheap USB drives. We are finding many have hidden
files on them that transfer over to your computer when connected. It's just
another method to infect computer systems with malicious programs.



 
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nospam
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      12-29-2008
In article <ntX5l.3994$(E-Mail Removed)>, 23DAVID1
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Be careful when buying cheap USB drives. We are finding many have hidden
> files on them that transfer over to your computer when connected. It's just
> another method to infect computer systems with malicious programs.


nonsense.
 
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23DAVID1
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      12-29-2008

"nospam" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:281220082249001796%(E-Mail Removed)...
> In article <ntX5l.3994$(E-Mail Removed)>, 23DAVID1
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Be careful when buying cheap USB drives. We are finding many have hidden
>> files on them that transfer over to your computer when connected. It's
>> just
>> another method to infect computer systems with malicious programs.

>
> nonsense.


It's an simple way to spread worms and Trojans. Load them up on a bunch of
cheap USB drives and flashcards and leave them in places where people can
easily find them. They are cheap to buy and easy to place in places where
they can be found quickly.

You don't click on suspicious emails or links, why would you plug in a
flashcard or USB drive into your computer that you found sitting on a chair
or library table? How do you know it's harmless?


 
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nospam
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-29-2008
In article <k2Y5l.3995$(E-Mail Removed)>, 23DAVID1
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> >> Be careful when buying cheap USB drives. We are finding many have hidden
> >> files on them that transfer over to your computer when connected. It's
> >> just
> >> another method to infect computer systems with malicious programs.

> >
> > nonsense.

>
> It's an simple way to spread worms and Trojans. Load them up on a bunch of
> cheap USB drives and flashcards and leave them in places where people can
> easily find them. They are cheap to buy and easy to place in places where
> they can be found quickly.


> You don't click on suspicious emails or links, why would you plug in a
> flashcard or USB drive into your computer that you found sitting on a chair
> or library table? How do you know it's harmless?


the issue is *buying* a new drive, not plugging one in that was found
on a chair someplace.
 
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23DAVID1
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      12-29-2008

"nospam" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:281220082348034285%(E-Mail Removed)...
> In article <k2Y5l.3995$(E-Mail Removed)>, 23DAVID1
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> >> Be careful when buying cheap USB drives. We are finding many have
>> >> hidden
>> >> files on them that transfer over to your computer when connected. It's
>> >> just
>> >> another method to infect computer systems with malicious programs.
>> >
>> > nonsense.

>>
>> It's an simple way to spread worms and Trojans. Load them up on a bunch
>> of
>> cheap USB drives and flashcards and leave them in places where people can
>> easily find them. They are cheap to buy and easy to place in places where
>> they can be found quickly.

>
>> You don't click on suspicious emails or links, why would you plug in a
>> flashcard or USB drive into your computer that you found sitting on a
>> chair
>> or library table? How do you know it's harmless?

>
> the issue is *buying* a new drive, not plugging one in that was found
> on a chair someplace.


Even "off the shelf'" devices can be suspect especially when they come
bundled with pre-loaded software.

I test all my new drives and flashcards through a isolated test machine
which wipes and re-formats the drive.

You can never be too safe, it's a scary world out there...

23DAVID1

 
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Shawn Hirn
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-29-2008
In article <ZNY5l.3997$(E-Mail Removed)>,
"23DAVID1" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> "nospam" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:281220082348034285%(E-Mail Removed)...
> > In article <k2Y5l.3995$(E-Mail Removed)>, 23DAVID1
> > <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >
> >> >> Be careful when buying cheap USB drives. We are finding many have
> >> >> hidden
> >> >> files on them that transfer over to your computer when connected. It's
> >> >> just
> >> >> another method to infect computer systems with malicious programs.
> >> >
> >> > nonsense.
> >>
> >> It's an simple way to spread worms and Trojans. Load them up on a bunch
> >> of
> >> cheap USB drives and flashcards and leave them in places where people can
> >> easily find them. They are cheap to buy and easy to place in places where
> >> they can be found quickly.

> >
> >> You don't click on suspicious emails or links, why would you plug in a
> >> flashcard or USB drive into your computer that you found sitting on a
> >> chair
> >> or library table? How do you know it's harmless?

> >
> > the issue is *buying* a new drive, not plugging one in that was found
> > on a chair someplace.

>
> Even "off the shelf'" devices can be suspect especially when they come
> bundled with pre-loaded software.
>
> I test all my new drives and flashcards through a isolated test machine
> which wipes and re-formats the drive.
>
> You can never be too safe, it's a scary world out there...


I use a Mac, so its not a big concern for me. Nothing gets installed on
my Mac without me knowing it (and approving it). Still, I am curious if
this has ever happened. Has a USB jump drive directly from a store been
a vector for malware? If so, do you have proof of it, or are you just
being paranoid?
 
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Jürgen Exner
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      12-29-2008
Shawn Hirn <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>Has a USB jump drive directly from a store been
>a vector for malware?


It is very common for USB- and other drives to come preloaded with
software which installs automatically when connected to the computer for
the first time. For many people this constitutes malware.

If you agree or not probably depends on your definition of malware.

jue
 
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TheRealSteve
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-29-2008

On Mon, 29 Dec 2008 07:58:25 -0500, Shawn Hirn <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>In article <ZNY5l.3997$(E-Mail Removed)>,
> "23DAVID1" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> "nospam" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:281220082348034285%(E-Mail Removed)...
>> > In article <k2Y5l.3995$(E-Mail Removed)>, 23DAVID1
>> > <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> >
>> >> >> Be careful when buying cheap USB drives. We are finding many have
>> >> >> hidden
>> >> >> files on them that transfer over to your computer when connected. It's
>> >> >> just
>> >> >> another method to infect computer systems with malicious programs.
>> >> >
>> >> > nonsense.
>> >>
>> >> It's an simple way to spread worms and Trojans. Load them up on a bunch
>> >> of
>> >> cheap USB drives and flashcards and leave them in places where people can
>> >> easily find them. They are cheap to buy and easy to place in places where
>> >> they can be found quickly.
>> >
>> >> You don't click on suspicious emails or links, why would you plug in a
>> >> flashcard or USB drive into your computer that you found sitting on a
>> >> chair
>> >> or library table? How do you know it's harmless?
>> >
>> > the issue is *buying* a new drive, not plugging one in that was found
>> > on a chair someplace.

>>
>> Even "off the shelf'" devices can be suspect especially when they come
>> bundled with pre-loaded software.
>>
>> I test all my new drives and flashcards through a isolated test machine
>> which wipes and re-formats the drive.
>>
>> You can never be too safe, it's a scary world out there...

>
>I use a Mac, so its not a big concern for me. Nothing gets installed on
>my Mac without me knowing it (and approving it). Still, I am curious if
>this has ever happened. Has a USB jump drive directly from a store been
>a vector for malware? If so, do you have proof of it, or are you just
>being paranoid?


I don't know about USB jump drives but I don't see why not considering
that several types of devices have had nasty viruses (not just
"malware", which could be anything you don't want, but virus) on them
directly from a store.

First, you have Apple iPods. From Apple (who of course puts a minimal
spin on it, you can find better articles on google):

http://www.apple.com/support/windowsvirus/

And Creative Labs MP3 players:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/09...er_virus_flap/

And Seagate/Maxtor hard drives. From Seagate (who again puts a
minimal spin on it):

http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/sup...rage/ps3200-sw

And digital photo frames:

http://tech.yahoo.com/blog/null/66647

And TomTom GPS units:

http://news.zdnet.com/2100-1009_22-151043.html

I'm sure there's others so why not USB drives also?

Steve
 
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