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Photoshop recommendations

 
 
John McWilliams
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      12-24-2008
Stephen Bishop wrote:

> I'll strongly second the recommendation for Elements. It is a very
> nice program on its own, not just a "limited" version of Photoshop.
> But it it looks and feels like Photoshop. If you find you want or
> need the extra features that the full Photoshop offers, you can always
> spend the few hundred extra dollars at that time.


Moreover, if you're familiar with Elements, you'll have a headstart
when, if, and as you move up to Photoshop. It is also [- both of them;
they are - ] cross platform, which is one reason to recommend against
Paintshop Pro and Apple's aperture.

Thus, when if and as you move to a better OS, you'll be up on the
learning curve there.

--
john mcwilliams
 
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Dave Cohen
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      12-24-2008
Neil Jones wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I am amateur photographer, only up to the point of taking pictures. For
> the pictures I shoot, I do not process the pictures or enhance them with
> touch ups etc. The pictures that turn out good are printed and the rest
> are saved.
>
> I am planning to purchase Photoshop to enhance the photos. It appears
> that Photoshop has a religious following in the photo processing area.
> To tell the truth, when I went to the Adobe site I was completely lost.
> They have tons of products with varying price ranges. What Photoshop
> version(s) are used by the community at large to process and enhance
> photos? What would be the price range?
>
> Thank you in advance for any help.
>
> Happy Holidays!
>
> NJ
>
> PS - What are plugins? Do you need to buy them separately from Photoshop?


PS is a very expensive product with a steep learning curve. It's the
standard for professionals, particularly if final output is for
professional publication.

I've never used elements but understand it's all the normal amateur
would need. I've used PhotoPlus and now use PSP9. The latter is almost
given away if you can find it. Later versions are distributed by Corel.
All the above are really adequate. You can get lots of free stuff, but
at some time or other you'll discover layers and for that you will need
something a little better than a freebie, which is not to knock the
latter. FastStone is great for quick fix ups and cropping.

One last point, there is a free and quite powerful product known at The
Gimp. Some people seem to love it, I don't. You would need to download a
copy and see for yourself.
Dave Cohen
 
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Leo Lichtman
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      12-25-2008
I started with Photoshop Elements 4, and I was fortunate that just at the
right time, a retired UC professor in my area offered weekly lessons on it
in his home. I want to emphacize this: using a program that is popular has
its advantages. You can find people to talk to, ask questions and compare
experiences with, like I did. We still meet in this professor's home and
discuss our work, even though the instructional part is over. Being with
others who share the same background and experience is very rewarding; you
never stop learning.


 
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Dave Cohen
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      12-25-2008
Leo Lichtman wrote:
> I started with Photoshop Elements 4, and I was fortunate that just at the
> right time, a retired UC professor in my area offered weekly lessons on it
> in his home. I want to emphacize this: using a program that is popular has
> its advantages. You can find people to talk to, ask questions and compare
> experiences with, like I did. We still meet in this professor's home and
> discuss our work, even though the instructional part is over. Being with
> others who share the same background and experience is very rewarding; you
> never stop learning.
>
>

I agree. I use PSP9 because I got it for around $12, but not only your
experience is relevant, anytime I see a 'how to do it' type article in
Photo magazines, it invariably illustrates using PS, but my
understanding is this is more easily translated into Elements than
other, although most of the time I can translate into PSP. Earlier on
someone included a link for Elements 6 for $28, which is very tempting.
The point I would emphasize is one shouldn't jump into the full version
of PS until he knows that is really what he needs (unless money is no
object).
My local library has a whole slew of books on PS and a reasonable
selection on elements. Not much on PSP
Dave Cohen
 
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tony cooper
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      12-25-2008
On Wed, 24 Dec 2008 22:54:22 -0500, Dave Cohen <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>Leo Lichtman wrote:
>> I started with Photoshop Elements 4, and I was fortunate that just at the
>> right time, a retired UC professor in my area offered weekly lessons on it
>> in his home. I want to emphacize this: using a program that is popular has
>> its advantages. You can find people to talk to, ask questions and compare
>> experiences with, like I did. We still meet in this professor's home and
>> discuss our work, even though the instructional part is over. Being with
>> others who share the same background and experience is very rewarding; you
>> never stop learning.
>>
>>

>I agree. I use PSP9 because I got it for around $12, but not only your
>experience is relevant, anytime I see a 'how to do it' type article in
>Photo magazines, it invariably illustrates using PS, but my
>understanding is this is more easily translated into Elements than
>other, although most of the time I can translate into PSP. Earlier on
>someone included a link for Elements 6 for $28, which is very tempting.
>The point I would emphasize is one shouldn't jump into the full version
>of PS until he knows that is really what he needs (unless money is no
>object).
>My local library has a whole slew of books on PS and a reasonable
>selection on elements. Not much on PSP
>Dave Cohen


It's appropriate to go back to the initial post. The OP takes
photographs, but has not been editing them. He's looking for a
program to take his first steps in editing photographs.

I recommended Elements as a good first step. Elements, at this level,
is easy-peasy. The "Quick Edit" module shows the original and the
results of any editing side by side. He can crop in this mode, click
the button for "Smart Fix" or "Auto Levels" and make just about any
decent photograph look more than presentable. A bit too dark on the
faces? Move the "Lighten Shadows" a bit to the right. The auto Red
Eye fix usually works. For 90% of the average photographer's output,
this works a treat.

There's some additional bells and whistles for anyone who wants to
follow one of the many online tutorials. Elements does Adjustment
Layers and creates Selections. It has most of the basic tools for
editing. The Spot Healing brush is easier to use than the Clone
Stamp.

Anyone who tries Elements can be successfully editing the average
photograph right away. No learning curve to speak of.

You can put that OP in the full Photoshop or Gimp, but the learning
curve is steeper. He can do more eventually, but there's no
indication that he's ready to do so or interested in doing so.





--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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tony cooper
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      12-25-2008
On Wed, 24 Dec 2008 23:36:58 -0500, tony cooper
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>It's appropriate to go back to the initial post. The OP takes
>photographs, but has not been editing them. He's looking for a
>program to take his first steps in editing photographs.
>

I see the same type of threads in the photography newsgroups. Some
guy comes in and wants a recommendation for a good camera because his
first grandchild was born and he wants to take photographs.

The thread then takes off into gearhead discussions on the attributes
of various cameras and the P&S vs dslr wars. Truth is, the new grampa
can buy the camera nearest the door and it will work for him as well
as the best camera in the store. All the guy's gonna do is point the
camera at the baby and push the button.

You really have to gear the discussion to the wants and needs of the
poster or you'll just add to the confusion that brought him to the
newsgroup in the first place.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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Leo Lichtman
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      12-25-2008

"tony cooper" wrote: (clip)You really have to gear the discussion to the
wants and needs of the
> poster or you'll just add to the confusion that brought him to the
> newsgroup in the first place.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
This sentence could well be cross-posted to a great many other newsgroups.
Well thought and well said.


 
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Bob Williams
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      12-25-2008
Neil Jones wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I am amateur photographer, only up to the point of taking pictures. For
> the pictures I shoot, I do not process the pictures or enhance them with
> touch ups etc. The pictures that turn out good are printed and the rest
> are saved.
>
> I am planning to purchase Photoshop to enhance the photos. It appears
> that Photoshop has a religious following in the photo processing area.
> To tell the truth, when I went to the Adobe site I was completely lost.
> They have tons of products with varying price ranges. What Photoshop
> version(s) are used by the community at large to process and enhance
> photos? What would be the price range?
>
> Thank you in advance for any help.
>
> Happy Holidays!
>
> NJ
>
> PS - What are plugins? Do you need to buy them separately from Photoshop?


Full Photoshop is a PROFESSIONAL program.
Although it is extremely powerful and versatile, it is NOT easy to learn
on your own.
Adode assumes that if you put out major bucks for the CS versions, you
are a working professional or serious amateur and you already know your
way around the program.
OTOH, PS Elements is an entry level program for persons like yourself
who are new to digital imaging. Entry level does not mean dumbed down.
PS Elements is extremely powerful and can do almost everything that a
newbie would want to do with full PS. But unlike full PS, Elements
volunteers a lot of help as you work thru the editing process.
Even so, using the tools in any photo editing program is not intuitive.
IMHO, you will need a well written book or manual to help you learn what
the various editing tools do and how to use them.
I suggest that you buy PS Elements 7 and STRONGLY encourage to purchase
a self-help book to go along with it. Over the years I have used a
number of self-help books on using PS and I can recommend the "Teach
Yourself Visually" series as well as the "Classroom in a Book" series by
the Adobe Staff.
Amazon carries both oh these series. For a rank beginner, I would start
with Teach Yourself......" and graduate to "Classroom........"
At Amazon.com, See:
http://www.amazon.com/Teach-Yourself...0189028&sr=1-4

Bob Williams
 
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Neil Jones
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      12-25-2008
Leo Lichtman wrote:
> I started with Photoshop Elements 4, and I was fortunate that just at the
> right time, a retired UC professor in my area offered weekly lessons on it
> in his home. I want to emphacize this: using a program that is popular has
> its advantages. You can find people to talk to, ask questions and compare
> experiences with, like I did. We still meet in this professor's home and
> discuss our work, even though the instructional part is over. Being with
> others who share the same background and experience is very rewarding; you
> never stop learning.
>
>


You hit the main point that had me post this question! I do have GIMP
on my system and have used it minimally over the years (only for
cropping). Now I want to do a little bit more than cropping the
pictures. I know GIMP can do what Adobe PS or Elements is doing. BUT,
the support groups/books/classes offered for GIMP are minimal compared
to Adobe Photoshop. Yes, the tutorials for GIMP at one or two main
websites do not motivate me to do anything creative/enchanements to my
pictures. The users on GIMP mailing list/newsgroup either have never
been tried what I am trying to accomplish with my photo editing or have
the attitude "Go figure it out yourself". Last but least, I am willing
to take a class which will teach me how to process pictures. So far
that I know, I have not seen anything for GIMP. Photoshop does have
quite a few classes. With Photoshop, my main confusion was about the
products at their website (Which one do I need?).

The other software packages, even the ones that came along with my
camera really don't interest me in trying to be creative with my pictures.

I think I will consider getting Photoshop Elements (in the next few
weeks) and consider taking a class.

Now, like Leo, I will need to find a university professor or some
professional who offers classes locally for Photoshop.

NJ
 
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Dave Cohen
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      12-25-2008
Bob Williams wrote:
> Neil Jones wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I am amateur photographer, only up to the point of taking pictures. For
>> the pictures I shoot, I do not process the pictures or enhance them with
>> touch ups etc. The pictures that turn out good are printed and the rest
>> are saved.
>>
>> I am planning to purchase Photoshop to enhance the photos. It appears
>> that Photoshop has a religious following in the photo processing area.
>> To tell the truth, when I went to the Adobe site I was completely lost.
>> They have tons of products with varying price ranges. What Photoshop
>> version(s) are used by the community at large to process and enhance
>> photos? What would be the price range?
>>
>> Thank you in advance for any help.
>>
>> Happy Holidays!
>>
>> NJ
>>
>> PS - What are plugins? Do you need to buy them separately from
>> Photoshop?

>
> Full Photoshop is a PROFESSIONAL program.
> Although it is extremely powerful and versatile, it is NOT easy to learn
> on your own.
> Adode assumes that if you put out major bucks for the CS versions, you
> are a working professional or serious amateur and you already know your
> way around the program.
> OTOH, PS Elements is an entry level program for persons like yourself
> who are new to digital imaging. Entry level does not mean dumbed down.
> PS Elements is extremely powerful and can do almost everything that a
> newbie would want to do with full PS. But unlike full PS, Elements
> volunteers a lot of help as you work thru the editing process.
> Even so, using the tools in any photo editing program is not intuitive.
> IMHO, you will need a well written book or manual to help you learn what
> the various editing tools do and how to use them.
> I suggest that you buy PS Elements 7 and STRONGLY encourage to purchase
> a self-help book to go along with it. Over the years I have used a
> number of self-help books on using PS and I can recommend the "Teach
> Yourself Visually" series as well as the "Classroom in a Book" series by
> the Adobe Staff.
> Amazon carries both oh these series. For a rank beginner, I would start
> with Teach Yourself......" and graduate to "Classroom........"
> At Amazon.com, See:
> http://www.amazon.com/Teach-Yourself...0189028&sr=1-4
>
>
> Bob Williams


I just took advantage of that $12 for Elements 6 from Price Grabber, so
I'll be able to get a good feel for how it compares to my current PSP 9.
All packages do red eye in one way or another, but PSP 9 does it in
style, you get to choices on what to replace with, and for animal lovers
is has an animal selection which is nice. They get same problem but
color is usually other than red.
Now at least I should be able to get a decent book or two that relates
to what I'm using without having to translate (although much of the time
that does work).
For $12 the op could play with that at low risk. I looked at some
reviews and there doesn't appear to be much lost in 6 from version 7.
Dave Cohen
 
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