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Privacy Question: Can volatile RAM still contain evidence?

 
 
GreenXenon
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-22-2008
Hi:

Can informating stored in volatile RAM still be recovered after the
computer is turned off? I remember reading something on a forensics
website that the evidence is not only on the platters of the HDD but
also on the disk cache chips and the volatile RAM chips in the PC.

Even if the PC is turned-off, the chips still contain sufficient
amount of info that can be recoverd by top-secret devils of the NSA
and Central Security Service. Apparenty they have some devices that
can read EXTREMELY-WEAK electric signals from volatile RAM chips and
recover what was lost then the power was turned-off. Is this true? If
so, how to prevent this while still expressing my socially-
unacceptable opinions on the internet?

Are there any RAM chips that are PURELY-VOLATILE and that will lose
all info when power is lost? If so, I'm thinking of buying a PC which
uses these chips. As soon as I turn off the comp, no info remains at
all.

This is another reason I was discussing about RAM chips in another
thread a few of minutes ago.

Please note that I do not plan to write anything illegal on the net --
no threats, no confessions, etc. However, I would like to express my
opinions in chat rooms w/out facing negative consequences.

My opinions differ from that of the general public and I want to
forcefully-express my vulgar, obscene, and socially-unacceptable
opinions in chat rooms [such as Yahoo-chat, ICQ, IRC, chat-zone, and
spin-chat] without being falsely-accused of crime.

While what I would like to write in chat-rooms is not illegal, public
pressure would force authorities to do something. Public pressure
might also force the enactment of new unjust laws possibly rendering
my speeches illegal in the future.

Sometimes authorities are forced to arrest and imprison innocent law-
abiding citizens because of public outrage. At heart, the authorites
don't want to jail innocent people but they have no choice. Society,
being the evil scum it is, will overpower the police and force them to
illegaly imprison me. Crowds of sadistic human beings will overturn
police cars and start harming the police, if the police don't illegaly-
arrest me. Sort of like a lynch-mob mentality against the police and
me.

I need protection from this unlawful, public-forced treatment.

Sometimes society and the law are on opposite ends. This is one of
them.

That is why I would like to get a PC that doesn't any RAM that is
"purely-volatile" by my above definition.

Because I am a complete law-abiding citizen, I have nothing to hide
from the police. However, I have everything to hide from the public
and society.

In lynch-mob situations, police are powerless to do what they know is
right. The cops are helpless must be a slave to the evil society.

I respect the law, but I hate society.

For the HDD platters, even after you thoroughly delete, overwrite and
format a gazillion times, you're still on thin ice. The NSA and
Central Security Service have equipment they can use to recover data
from the magnetic platters on the HDD. The equipment they use is
*extremely* sensitive to *extremely* weak magnetic signals on the
magnetic platters. The only way to truly get rid off the data is to
heat the platters beyond Curie point. The cache chips in the HD might
also need to be burnt.

I am worried similar sensitive devices could be used to read the
extremely-weak electric signals present in the volatile RAM chips and
disc cache chips.

Due to the laws of physics, I suspect that the volatile RAM info might
-- to some extent -- exist even after the system is turned off. Sure
the wattage of those electric signals maybe *extremely*-low after shut
down, but that does not mean the signals are not there anymore -- they
are just way too weak to be detected and analyzed by ordinary means.
At the quantum level, the differences in wattage levels which
constitute what was the original volatile RAM info will continue to be
there in the chip.

I'm hoping this is just my paranoia and not true.

Also, the disc cache chips are another grave concern to me, they also
store RAM -- just not nearly as much as the platters of the HDD.

I wonder if there are any PCs for sale anywhere that are free of any
NVRAM devices and still work. The disdvantage of this is that nothing
can be saved. The advantage is, malware can't be planted in it. Such a
PC could connect to the internet and store text on websites -- for
example, I could 'save' something by emailing it to myself and then
accessing it later.


Thanks,

Radium
 
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J D
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-22-2008

"GreenXenon" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi:
>
> Can informating stored in volatile RAM still be recovered after the
> computer is turned off? I remember reading something on a forensics
> website that the evidence is not only on the platters of the HDD but
> also on the disk cache chips and the volatile RAM chips in the PC.
>
> Even if the PC is turned-off, the chips still contain sufficient
> amount of info that can be recoverd by top-secret devils of the NSA
> and Central Security Service. Apparenty they have some devices that
> can read EXTREMELY-WEAK electric signals from volatile RAM chips and
> recover what was lost then the power was turned-off. Is this true? If
> so, how to prevent this while still expressing my socially-
> unacceptable opinions on the internet?
>
> Are there any RAM chips that are PURELY-VOLATILE and that will lose
> all info when power is lost? If so, I'm thinking of buying a PC which
> uses these chips. As soon as I turn off the comp, no info remains at
> all.
>
> This is another reason I was discussing about RAM chips in another
> thread a few of minutes ago.
>
> Please note that I do not plan to write anything illegal on the net --
> no threats, no confessions, etc. However, I would like to express my
> opinions in chat rooms w/out facing negative consequences.
>
> My opinions differ from that of the general public and I want to
> forcefully-express my vulgar, obscene, and socially-unacceptable
> opinions in chat rooms [such as Yahoo-chat, ICQ, IRC, chat-zone, and
> spin-chat] without being falsely-accused of crime.
>
> While what I would like to write in chat-rooms is not illegal, public
> pressure would force authorities to do something. Public pressure
> might also force the enactment of new unjust laws possibly rendering
> my speeches illegal in the future.
>
> Sometimes authorities are forced to arrest and imprison innocent law-
> abiding citizens because of public outrage. At heart, the authorites
> don't want to jail innocent people but they have no choice. Society,
> being the evil scum it is, will overpower the police and force them to
> illegaly imprison me. Crowds of sadistic human beings will overturn
> police cars and start harming the police, if the police don't illegaly-
> arrest me. Sort of like a lynch-mob mentality against the police and
> me.
>
> I need protection from this unlawful, public-forced treatment.
>
> Sometimes society and the law are on opposite ends. This is one of
> them.
>
> That is why I would like to get a PC that doesn't any RAM that is
> "purely-volatile" by my above definition.
>
> Because I am a complete law-abiding citizen, I have nothing to hide
> from the police. However, I have everything to hide from the public
> and society.
>
> In lynch-mob situations, police are powerless to do what they know is
> right. The cops are helpless must be a slave to the evil society.
>
> I respect the law, but I hate society.
>
> For the HDD platters, even after you thoroughly delete, overwrite and
> format a gazillion times, you're still on thin ice. The NSA and
> Central Security Service have equipment they can use to recover data
> from the magnetic platters on the HDD. The equipment they use is
> *extremely* sensitive to *extremely* weak magnetic signals on the
> magnetic platters. The only way to truly get rid off the data is to
> heat the platters beyond Curie point. The cache chips in the HD might
> also need to be burnt.
>
> I am worried similar sensitive devices could be used to read the
> extremely-weak electric signals present in the volatile RAM chips and
> disc cache chips.
>
> Due to the laws of physics, I suspect that the volatile RAM info might
> -- to some extent -- exist even after the system is turned off. Sure
> the wattage of those electric signals maybe *extremely*-low after shut
> down, but that does not mean the signals are not there anymore -- they
> are just way too weak to be detected and analyzed by ordinary means.
> At the quantum level, the differences in wattage levels which
> constitute what was the original volatile RAM info will continue to be
> there in the chip.
>
> I'm hoping this is just my paranoia and not true.
>
> Also, the disc cache chips are another grave concern to me, they also
> store RAM -- just not nearly as much as the platters of the HDD.
>
> I wonder if there are any PCs for sale anywhere that are free of any
> NVRAM devices and still work. The disdvantage of this is that nothing
> can be saved. The advantage is, malware can't be planted in it. Such a
> PC could connect to the internet and store text on websites -- for
> example, I could 'save' something by emailing it to myself and then
> accessing it later.
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Radium



They should never have let you out


 
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Rhonda Lea Kirk Fries
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-22-2008
GreenXenon wrote:

<multi-posted dissertation snipped>

At least everyone in 24hoursupport.helpdesk didn't have to endure the
additional four posts' worth of typo corrections...unlike the hapless
souls in alt.privacy.spyware.

Whatever it is you've done that you don't want anyone to find out about
must be heinous, but even if it isn't, I can only hope that they lock
you up and throw away the key so that you cannot inflict such as this on
other innocent souls.

--
Rhonda Lea Kirk Fries

"You know you can indict a ham sandwich if you want to."
William J. Martini, Judge, United States District Court


 
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TompangBuddy.Com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-22-2008
The answer is YES. But only if the system is quickly switched back on. Some
volatile RAMs can retain information for about 15 minutes or so. You just
have to boot back the system with a linux CD and read from the memory. You
can even recover passwords stored in memory this way.

YouTube videos demonstrating
http://www.youtube.com/results?searc...ncryption+Keys

--
http://www.tompangbuddy.com
Share Cab, Carpool and Save Earth in Singapore
"GreenXenon" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi:
>
> Can informating stored in volatile RAM still be recovered after the
> computer is turned off? I remember reading something on a forensics
> website that the evidence is not only on the platters of the HDD but
> also on the disk cache chips and the volatile RAM chips in the PC...



 
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攸hw不f
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-22-2008
ftwhd wrote:
> On Sun, 21 Dec 2008 17:46:41 -0800 (PST), GreenXenon
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Hi:

>
>
> High is right. Wop, wop, wop...that's the sound of the black
> helicopters hovering overhead.
>
> I am the real ftwhd and I approve this message.


Perhaps he's in CHina or some other country where people dont have a
democratic system to protect them.
FYI, you ****ing dolt.
 
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Rhonda Lea Kirk Fries
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-22-2008
攸hw不f wrote:

<snipped>

> Perhaps he's in CHina or some other country where people dont have a
> democratic system to protect them.


Perhaps not.

IP address: 98.154.25.80
Host name: cpe-98-154-25-80.socal.res.rr.com
98.154.25.80 is from United States(US) in region North America

--
Rhonda Lea Kirk Fries

"You know you can indict a ham sandwich if you want to."
William J. Martini, Judge, United States District Court


 
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G. Morgan
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-22-2008
Lookout wrote:

>EVERYTHING you say on the net is permanent. Getting it off your
>computer won't help you one bit


That's true.

>On Sun, 21 Dec 2008 17:46:41 -0800 (PST), GreenXenon
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>Hi:
>>
>>Can informating stored in volatile RAM still be recovered after the
>>computer is turned off? I remember reading something on a forensics
>>website that the evidence is not only on the platters of the HDD but
>>also on the disk cache chips and the volatile RAM chips in the PC.


Actually, project TEMPEST involved doing exactly that (among other cool
things).



--
Consider the daffodil. And while you're doing that,
I'll be over here, looking through your stuff. -Jack Handey
 
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GreenXenon
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-22-2008
On Dec 21, 7:08 pm, "Rhonda Lea Kirk Fries" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

> Whatever it is you've done that you don't want anyone to find out about
> must be heinous, but even if it isn't, I can only hope that they lock
> you up and throw away the key so that you cannot inflict such as this on
> other innocent souls.


y r u so angry at me?
 
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Rhonda Lea Kirk Fries
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-22-2008
GreenXenon wrote:
> On Dec 21, 7:08 pm, "Rhonda Lea Kirk Fries" <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>> Whatever it is you've done that you don't want anyone to find out
>> about must be heinous, but even if it isn't, I can only hope that
>> they lock you up and throw away the key so that you cannot inflict
>> such as this on other innocent souls.

>
> y r u so angry at me?


I'm not.

It's all usenet-style rhetoric, except for the following:

1. Don't multi-post.

2. Don't proofread your posts /after/ you send them and then force
everyone to read additional posts with nothing but typo corrections.

3. If it's illegal, don't do it. Then you won't have to worry about
getting
caught, and posts such as those you made will be unnecessary.

--
Rhonda Lea Kirk Fries

"You know you can indict a ham sandwich if you want to."
William J. Martini, Judge, United States District Court


 
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攸hw不f
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-23-2008
Rhonda Lea Kirk Fries wrote:
> 攸hw不f wrote:
>
> <snipped>
>
>> Perhaps he's in CHina or some other country where people dont have a
>> democratic system to protect them.

>
> Perhaps not.
>
> IP address: 98.154.25.80
> Host name: cpe-98-154-25-80.socal.res.rr.com
> 98.154.25.80 is from United States(US) in region North America
>

Hmmmmmmm...I stand corrected...
 
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