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Who gets higher salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?

 
 
Arne Vajhøj
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      11-23-2008
Peter Duniho wrote:
> C++ is a somewhat lower-level language, while at the same time offers in
> some ways much more complex behaviors than Java. Because of that, I'd
> recommend learning Java first, just because it's likely to be somewhat
> easier.


It is much easier to learn Java than C++ as first language.

But it is also much easier to go C++ -> Java than Java -> C++.

So I am not convinced that learning Java first and C++ later
is in total easier than learning C++ first and Java later.

Arne
 
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Arne Vajhj
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      11-23-2008
Joshua Cranmer wrote:
> Sanny wrote:
>> I get a lot confused as many times I use Java code in C++ and C++ code
>> in Java.
>>
>> So I have descided to only work in one Language.

>
> Poor choice. Most employers would rather employ the programmer who can
> utilize multiple programming languages over one who will choose to use
> but a single language.


I think the bad thing of focusing on only one language is the
lack of perspective. Learning multiple languages gives a much
better perspective on things.

Job wise I think the majority either hires for a specific skill set
or hire someone they think is bright enough to learn what is needed.
Too few managers care about whether the new hire will be easy to
move to another department/project that uses another language and
what will happen in 5 or 10 years when the company changes
technology.

Arne
 
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Arne Vajhj
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      11-23-2008
Roedy Green wrote:
> On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 00:29:12 -0800 (PST), Sanny
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who
> said :
>> What language should I master. I just want to know who gets higher
>> salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?

>
> To me that would be well down on my list of considerations. I ask
> questions like this:
>
> 1. which language do I enjoy coding more? What counts is how much I
> enjoy my life. I spend a LOT of it coding.
>
> 2. which language will let me tackle more interesting projects. For
> than reason COBOL is out. I have no interested in maintaining payroll
> programs.


I am convinced that there are interesting projects in any language.

> If I wanted to make money, I would learn the arcane art of
> Unix system administration.


I am not sure Unix sys admin is arcane.

> 3. Which language will leave my options open where I work. I don't
> want to get stuck in some place I hate. I want to be able to go
> anywhere. Which language is become more accepted. Which are becoming
> obsolete?


History shows that salaries are usually not bad for languages and
technologies becoming obsolete. Sure demand goes down, but so does
supply.

> 4. Which languages offer work from home?


Unlikely to be correlated with programming language.

Arne
 
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Arne Vajhj
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      11-23-2008
Arne Vajhj wrote:
> Sanny wrote:
>> How much max salary per Annum I can get If I become a C++ Expert.
>>
>> and How much max salary per Annum I can get If I become a Java Expert.

>
> Salary depends on where work, your experience and your general
> programming skills (not language and technology specific).
>
> The languages and technologies you know should have much less
> impact on salary level.


The only specific skill set that seems to have an
above average salary level is SAP knowledge !

Arne
 
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Joshua Cranmer
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      11-23-2008
Peter Duniho wrote:
> On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 17:43:35 -0800, Arne Vajhøj <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> But it is also much easier to go C++ -> Java than Java -> C++.

>
> I'm not sure of that. I've seen a lot of people get frustrated and
> tripped up by differences between the languages when they try to move
> from C++ to Java.


From observation of other students in classes (my school's curriculum,
like most, started with Java), the single biggest trouble people had in
trying to learn C/C++ was pointers. Classes never got around to
templates (then again, the introductory courses barely covered generics
and presumably ignored all the new features in Java 5 [1]), so I can't
say how much that would cause people to struggle. I have also
observed--with a different group of people, so the results aren't really
comparable--that some people also tend to struggle with Java's
pass-by-value and how it affects Object references.

To me, it seems like someone going from C++ to Java would be able to
quickly understand that an Object in Java is roughly equivalent to
Object* in C++, more quickly than the people going the other way to
learn pointers. The inequivalence of char[] and String may also snag
some people, but I'm not sure how hard people would find it.

>> So I am not convinced that learning Java first and C++ later
>> is in total easier than learning C++ first and Java later.

>
> I'm not convinced that there's a clear advantage one way or the other.
> I think there will always been room for equivocation, given the vast
> variability of programming students.


In other words: The average difference in skill level between learning
Java then C++ and learning C++ then Java is less than the standard
variability in learning the two languages?

> But, inasmuch as there may be a measurable difference, I do know which
> will get a person programming productively sooner (Java). In additon,
> there will still be advantages to learning and using C++ later, but the
> fundamental OOP principles will be easier to learn in the context of the
> simpler, stricter language than in the more complex, more difficult one.


One theory that has been espoused is to start people off of neither--my
university does the first course in Python and my high school considered
it. I can't speak if it has any benefits, though.

[1] This is speculation since I skipped all introductory CS courses. I
cannot say for certain the content of anything below a Data Structures &
Algorithms course. On the other hand, my observations of classmates are
all going to be for people intent on continuing programming (my school
required the introductory course).

--
Beware of bugs in the above code; I have only proved it correct, not
tried it. -- Donald E. Knuth
 
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Sherm Pendley
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      11-23-2008
"Peter Duniho" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> I've seen a lot of people get frustrated and
> tripped up by differences between the languages when they try to move
> from C++ to Java.


I think that can be more generalized though - people tend to get
frustrated and tripped up when they move from their first language to
their second. They don't have the breadth of experience they need to
understand the difference between concepts and syntax.

Additional languages beyond that tend to be much easier.

sherm--

--
My blog: http://shermspace.blogspot.com
Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
 
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Matthias Buelow
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      11-23-2008
Sanny wrote:

> What language should I master. I just want to know who gets higher
> salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?


COBOL makes the most, I hear.
 
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Martin Gregorie
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      11-23-2008
On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 20:51:14 -0500, Arne Vajhøj wrote:

> Job wise I think the majority either hires for a specific skill set or
> hire someone they think is bright enough to learn what is needed. Too
> few managers care about whether the new hire will be easy to move to
> another department/project that uses another language and what will
> happen in 5 or 10 years when the company changes technology.
>

IME that's nothing to do with the manager who needs the new hire: the
initial hiring task gets given to HR who know nothing about programming
or programming skills but do know how to match acronyms and names on the
manager's skills list with those on a CV. The same applies to recruitment
agencies. The result is that the candidates who get interviewed are
simply those whose CVs get the most hits from what's little more than a
clerical matching exercise.

IOW the manager may know what he wants in the way of transferrable skills
but this gets dropped on the floor by the agency and HR people because
they don't understand IT. The current habit of condensing CVs to one or
two pages and concentrating only on recent experience just exacerbates
the problem.


--
martin@ | Martin Gregorie
gregorie. | Essex, UK
org |
 
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Arne Vajhøj
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      11-23-2008
Ken T. wrote:
> On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 15:42:04 -0800, Roedy Green wrote:
>> 4. Which languages offer work from home?

>
> I've got to ask.. I've tried this alternative using places like Guru.com
> to get jobs and I've found I just can't make any money and the clients
> are not the kind of clients you want. They want a lot of work for very
> little money.. even work for free in some cases. I want to make my
> clients happy, but I need to get paid for my time and this just doesn't
> seem to work out well.
>
> How do you get jobs where you get to work from home without having to
> charge the same rates a person in Deli will charge.


Well as you have noticed then rentacoder/elance/guru/whatever
is not the place to go.

Find a big company that have found out that office space is
expensive !

Arne
 
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Sanny
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      11-23-2008
> I've got to ask.. I've tried this alternative using places like Guru.com
> to get jobs and I've found I just can't make any money and the clients
> are not the kind of clients you want. *They want a lot of work for very
> little money.. even work for free in some cases. *I want to make my
> clients happy, but I need to get paid for my time and this just doesn't
> seem to work out well.


At these places only small companies or business owners come. And big
company with years work contact developing companies directly.

At http://www.GetClub.com/Experts.php you can tell your expertise and
get work from home work. You only get small orders in such places. As
large work people choose already established companies instead of
giving work to strangers who may spoil the work.

Bye
Sanny

 
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