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Re: UNIX, C, Perl

 
 
Bill Reid
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      09-02-2008

Pilcrow <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...

> Given that UNIX, including networking, is almost entirely coded in C,
> how come so many things are almost impossible in ordinary C? Examples:
> Network and internet access, access to UNIX interprocess controls and
> communication, locale determination, EBCDIC/ASCII discrimination, etc.
>
> Almost all of these are easy in Perl. Why isn't there a mechanism like
> perl modules to allow easy extentions for facilities like these? Isn't
> anyone working on this problem? or is it all being left for proprietary
> systems?


I thought "PERL" WAS coded in "C"...

Somebody, many people have worked on this "problem"; for example,
I got a "regex" PERL-like library for free with MY "C" compiler, along
with a bunch of other stuff, including stuff you mention...the only
people who haven't worked on it are those DAMN BEAURUCRATS
IN WASHINGTON!!! (or whever the "C" standards committee met,
and of course, their "portability" yipping lap-dogs here)...

---
William Ernest Reid


 
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John Bellone
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      09-02-2008
On Sep 2, 10:18*am, "Bill Reid" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Pilcrow <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> > Given that UNIX, including networking, is almost entirely coded in C,
> > how come so many things are almost impossible in ordinary C? *Examples:
> > Network and internet access, access to UNIX interprocess controls and
> > communication, locale determination, EBCDIC/ASCII discrimination, etc.

>
> > Almost all of these are easy in Perl. Why isn't there a mechanism like
> > perl modules to allow easy extentions for facilities like these? *Isn't
> > anyone working on this problem? or is it all being left for proprietary
> > systems?

>
> I thought "PERL" WAS coded in "C"...
>
> Somebody, many people have worked on this "problem"; for example,
> I got a "regex" PERL-like library for free with MY "C" compiler, along
> with a bunch of other stuff, including stuff you mention...the only
> people who haven't worked on it are those DAMN BEAURUCRATS
> IN WASHINGTON!!! *(or whever the "C" standards committee met,
> and of course, their "portability" yipping lap-dogs here)...
>
> ---
> William Ernest Reid


What are we considering "ordinary C?" Are we talking about the
libraries that are distributed with the GNU C library, any C compiler
that is POSIX standard supported, or are we talking about Visual C++?
The beauty of C is that it will run on damn near any piece of hardware
you throw at it. Almost every single platform's operating system is
written in a combination of C and (some form of) assembler. All of
these things that you mentioned are very possible, because frankly,
the language that you mentioned was implemented in C. The foundations
that you are building on were written in C, Pascal and assembler.

But here is the other interesting tidbit. Many languages that make it
easier for programmers to simply create a socket connection with two
lines of code (Python, C# and Java) have C libraries behind them doing
all the dirty work. If you really want to do all of these things in C
then your best bet is to follow a POSIX standard for sockets
(networking) and work strictly with C99 standards. You are almost
guaranteed that your code will run almost anywhere except certain
embedded platforms (and even those now are using POSIX compilers).

I am a firm believer that both C/C++ are portable as long as you have
someone in the background managing the projects. As long as the proper
libraries are used and standards are followed the code should be
relatively easy to port across platforms. But don't take my word for
it: there are many projects available at sourceforge.net that are open
source that can give you examples of a portable C application.
Although take a note: many "C" applications nowadays are essentially a
C++ application.
 
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jameskuyper@verizon.net
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      09-02-2008
Bill Reid wrote:
....
> IN WASHINGTON!!! (or whever the "C" standards committee met,


As you might expect for an international standards organization, the
meetings of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC22/WG14 are held in a wide variety of
places around the world. Judging from
<http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/meetings>, it would appear
that they have not met in Washington at any time since at least 1994,
and probably earlier. Since the US member is INCITS J11
<http://www.ncits.org/tc_home/j11.htm>, and that committee's meetings
are co-located with those of WG14, it doesn't look like Washington has
anything to do with this.
 
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