Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Computer Information > Wireless security follow-up

Reply
Thread Tools

Wireless security follow-up

 
 
Joe J.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-31-2008
Following the advice given here I am trying to enable the wireless security
on my router and need some help.

Option 1 is WEP
If I select WEP then I have the option of 64bit or 128bit, then key type of
Hex or Ascii.
I'm assuming hex is 8 of something. Is it just numbers?
What is ascii then? A combination of letters and numbers? How many? Eight
also?
Sorry if these are basic and dumb questions, don't jump all over me. It's
new to me and the Kyocera manual isn't very helpful.

Thanks,
Joe J


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Boscoe
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-31-2008

"Joe J." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:dPikk.34407$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Following the advice given here I am trying to enable the wireless
> security on my router and need some help.
>
> Option 1 is WEP
> If I select WEP then I have the option of 64bit or 128bit, then key type
> of Hex or Ascii.
> I'm assuming hex is 8 of something. Is it just numbers?
> What is ascii then? A combination of letters and numbers? How many?
> Eight also?
> Sorry if these are basic and dumb questions, don't jump all over me. It's
> new to me and the Kyocera manual isn't very helpful.
>
> Thanks,
> Joe J



*Do not use WEP*

WEP security has two standard encryption levels: 64-bit encryption relies on
a 40-bit key. The slightly stronger 128-bit level uses a 26-bit key.
Both levels are relatively easy to crack by passively intercepting network
traffic on a Wi-Fi equipped laptop. Hacking software analyses the data
packets, looking for repetitive patterns, which can reveal a key. WEP
encryption can also be actively hacked, using ‘brute force’ and ‘dictionary
attack’ methods, bombarding the system with log-on attempts whilst remaining
undetected by simulating normal network activity.


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Joe J.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-31-2008

"Boscoe" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:HVkkk.35541$(E-Mail Removed) om...
>
> "Joe J." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:dPikk.34407$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Following the advice given here I am trying to enable the wireless
>> security on my router and need some help.
>>
>> Option 1 is WEP
>> If I select WEP then I have the option of 64bit or 128bit, then key type
>> of Hex or Ascii.
>> I'm assuming hex is 8 of something. Is it just numbers?
>> What is ascii then? A combination of letters and numbers? How many?
>> Eight also?
>> Sorry if these are basic and dumb questions, don't jump all over me.
>> It's new to me and the Kyocera manual isn't very helpful.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Joe J

>
>
> *Do not use WEP*
>
> WEP security has two standard encryption levels: 64-bit encryption relies
> on a 40-bit key. The slightly stronger 128-bit level uses a 26-bit key.
> Both levels are relatively easy to crack by passively intercepting network
> traffic on a Wi-Fi equipped laptop. Hacking software analyses the data
> packets, looking for repetitive patterns, which can reveal a key. WEP
> encryption can also be actively hacked, using 'brute force' and
> 'dictionary attack' methods, bombarding the system with log-on attempts
> whilst remaining undetected by simulating normal network activity.
>

My other option is WPA-PSK. If I check that one, it wants a "passphrase".
Another name to picking a password?

Joe J


 
Reply With Quote
 
Boscoe
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-31-2008

"Joe J." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:NBlkk.17784$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>
>> *Do not use WEP*
>>
>> WEP security has two standard encryption levels: 64-bit encryption relies
>> on a 40-bit key. The slightly stronger 128-bit level uses a 26-bit key.
>> Both levels are relatively easy to crack by passively intercepting
>> network traffic on a Wi-Fi equipped laptop. Hacking software analyses the
>> data packets, looking for repetitive patterns, which can reveal a key.
>> WEP encryption can also be actively hacked, using 'brute force' and
>> 'dictionary attack' methods, bombarding the system with log-on attempts
>> whilst remaining undetected by simulating normal network activity.
>>

> My other option is WPA-PSK. If I check that one, it wants a "passphrase".
> Another name to picking a password?
>
> Joe J


WPA employs two types of security key: TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity
Protocol) creates a new key every time a PC or device logs onto the network,
making it almost impossible for it to be guessed or cracked.

WPA also uses a variation of the shared key system (WPA-PSK), which can be
used on older set-ups that do not fully support all WPA features.

Usually all you have to do is make sure the encryption mode is set to WPA
‘Personal’ or ‘PSK’ (Pre Shared Key) and TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity
Protocol) then enter your passphrase in the box. Note it down and keep it
somewhere safe. Once again when you have finished click Save or OK and exit
the router setup.


 
Reply With Quote
 
Joe J.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-31-2008

"Boscoe" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:Vknkk.35644$(E-Mail Removed) om...
>
> "Joe J." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:NBlkk.17784$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>
>>> *Do not use WEP*
>>>
>>> WEP security has two standard encryption levels: 64-bit encryption
>>> relies on a 40-bit key. The slightly stronger 128-bit level uses a
>>> 26-bit key.
>>> Both levels are relatively easy to crack by passively intercepting
>>> network traffic on a Wi-Fi equipped laptop. Hacking software analyses
>>> the data packets, looking for repetitive patterns, which can reveal a
>>> key. WEP encryption can also be actively hacked, using 'brute force' and
>>> 'dictionary attack' methods, bombarding the system with log-on attempts
>>> whilst remaining undetected by simulating normal network activity.
>>>

>> My other option is WPA-PSK. If I check that one, it wants a
>> "passphrase". Another name to picking a password?
>>
>> Joe J

>
> WPA employs two types of security key: TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity
> Protocol) creates a new key every time a PC or device logs onto the
> network, making it almost impossible for it to be guessed or cracked.
>
> WPA also uses a variation of the shared key system (WPA-PSK), which can be
> used on older set-ups that do not fully support all WPA features.
>
> Usually all you have to do is make sure the encryption mode is set to WPA
> 'Personal' or 'PSK' (Pre Shared Key) and TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity
> Protocol) then enter your passphrase in the box. Note it down and keep it
> somewhere safe. Once again when you have finished click Save or OK and
> exit the router setup.
>

The wireless set-up is on a desktop running XP-Pro. Where do I setup the
WPA, password etc.. on the desktop?
It is currently working but there is no security on the router at the
moment.

Joe J


 
Reply With Quote
 
Joe J.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-01-2008

"Tee Jay" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed). ..
>
>>>

>> The wireless set-up is on a desktop running XP-Pro. Where do I setup the
>> WPA, password etc.. on the desktop?
>> It is currently working but there is no security on the router at the
>> moment.
>>
>> Joe J

>
> You enter 192.168.0.0 or 192.168.0.1 in Internet Browser Address Bar.
> (Depends on who manufactured your router.) This gets you into Router
> Setup. and go tho the Wireless section to set security.
> Tee Jay


That part I understand and am ready to do. Where in the desktop machine, in
xp-pro. do I input the WPA password that I am about to enter into the
router?


 
Reply With Quote
 
Jeff Strickland
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-01-2008

"Joe J." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:dPikk.34407$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Following the advice given here I am trying to enable the wireless
> security on my router and need some help.
>
> Option 1 is WEP
> If I select WEP then I have the option of 64bit or 128bit, then key type
> of Hex or Ascii.
> I'm assuming hex is 8 of something. Is it just numbers?
> What is ascii then? A combination of letters and numbers? How many?
> Eight also?
> Sorry if these are basic and dumb questions, don't jump all over me. It's
> new to me and the Kyocera manual isn't very helpful.
>
> Thanks,
> Joe J
>


You want WEP.
Hex is a numbering scheme where each digit can be a value of 0-9, plus a-f.
This gives each digit a range of 16 possible choices, which fits well in the
4-bit binary scheme.

The default password is probably the MAC address printed on the device. You
can leave it at that, or make it a string that is meaningful to you. You
will be constrained to "0123456789abcdef" for the character choices, and you
have to use 10 digits.

You want to know where to find the default password because this is what it
will revert to if you ever have to reset the router.






 
Reply With Quote
 
Boscoe
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-01-2008

"Joe J." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:gIDkk.15979$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "Tee Jay" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed). ..
>>
>>>>
>>> The wireless set-up is on a desktop running XP-Pro. Where do I setup
>>> the WPA, password etc.. on the desktop?
>>> It is currently working but there is no security on the router at the
>>> moment.
>>>
>>> Joe J

>>
>> You enter 192.168.0.0 or 192.168.0.1 in Internet Browser Address Bar.
>> (Depends on who manufactured your router.) This gets you into Router
>> Setup. and go tho the Wireless section to set security.
>> Tee Jay

>
> That part I understand and am ready to do. Where in the desktop machine,
> in xp-pro. do I input the WPA password that I am about to enter into the
> router?


All you need to do is enable the encryption systems on the router and the
client PCs. Go to the router’s configuration menu. However, before you do
anything make sure that all of the PCs, other than the one used to configure
the router, are switched off. After logging on to the router you select
the Wireless Security menu and there should be a button, switch or drop-down
menu for enabling encryption and selecting WPA mode. After entering your
passphrase click Save or OK and exit the setup menu.

Reboot the router and PC and make sure that your Internet connection is
still live. Switch on the first of your wireless ‘client’ PCs. Double-click
the Wi-Fi configuration manager icon in the System Tray, this should show
that you have a good signal but you may get an error message saying it is
unable to connect or that you need to enter a key or passphrase.

On some setup utilities you may have to switch tabs to display an encryption
mode drop-down menu and key or passphrase entry box. Either way the object
of the exercise is to enter your key passphrase, click Save or OK and within
a few seconds the connection should be made.








 
Reply With Quote
 
jameshanley39@yahoo.co.uk
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-02-2008
On Jul 31, 2:08*pm, "Joe J." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> <snip> What is ascii then? <snip>


ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI


 
Reply With Quote
 
Joe J.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-02-2008

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
On Jul 31, 2:08 pm, "Joe J." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> <snip> What is ascii then? <snip>


ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI

GROAN!!




 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Belkin N1 Wireless USB Adapter (F5D8051 ver 2010uk) and Channel 13. Notes on Pre-N Notebook card (F5D8010 ver 1001uk), Wireless G Notebook card (F5D7011 ver 1000uk) and Wireless G Plus router (F5D7231-4 ver 3000uk) John Wireless Networking 1 07-27-2009 08:41 AM
Wireless Bridge VS Wireless Access Point for DVR connection to wireless network Mark Wireless Networking 0 12-28-2005 09:21 PM
Accessing higher security level from higher security level nderose@gmail.com Cisco 0 07-11-2005 10:20 PM
Going from higher security level interface to lower security interface- HELP!!! - AM Cisco 4 12-28-2004 09:52 PM
IT-Security, Security, e-security COMSOLIT Messmer Computer Support 0 09-05-2003 08:34 AM



Advertisments