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OEM 32-bit to 64-bit: Apology

 
 
Mark H
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      07-27-2008
I know, it's a newsgroup and people write the darnedest things, but some
calmly stick to their guns despite the turmoil and for that I believe they
deserve respect. Those few seem to be granted MVP status of which Charlie
Russel and Colin Barnhorst have the honor. Yes, they are human and can get
upset, just like me, but they number hundreds of calm posts to my individual
posts.

So, I'm writing this outside the original post because I think I was wrong
in my prior recommendations and owe Charlie and Colin an apology.
Unfortunately, my recommendations are "out there", so consider this also a
retraction. The title ties it to the most recent thread on the subject.

I re-read the Vista EULA (end-user, not System Builder.)
While I still believe that any product key is entitled to be used as 32-bit
or 64-bit (IMO), I would have to state that the use of ABR may not be legal
to migrate or re-install any version of Vista. As Charlie stated, it makes
it "technically possible."

While the use results in legally the same end product (without the
bloatware), how ABR was written may have compromised the EULA in that
reverse engineering would have been required to produce ABR. And, reverse
engineering Vista is definitively illegal. I will no longer support that
program by recommendation until the creators of ABR are willing to dictate
the procedure's creation is legal. (No matter their intentions.)

In the future, I would recommend to only use the product key you purchased
found on the bottom of the machine if you want to change bitness of your OEM
operating system. This also means that you either get a 64-bit OEM version
from the vendor, or you already have a retail version. This method of
migration is supported by MS activation and validation.

 
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Bobby Johnson
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-27-2008
I don't know if what I found is exactly correct, but the
info claims there is essentially no distinct OEM or Retail
version of the DVDs as there were with the Windows XP DCs.
Perhaps the only significant difference is when companies
such as Dell, HP, etc. add their specific drivers and bloat
ware.


http://www.mydigitallife.info/2007/0...-all-editions/

All Windows Vista DVD media are almost the same or similar
regardless of which version (upgrade, full or OEM) or
edition (Starter, Home Basic, Home Premium, Business or
Ultimate) of Windows Vista your purchased, probably as part
of Windows Anytime Upgrade program. The only thing that
matters is Windows Vista product key which will determine
which version and edition of Vista you can use, activate and
validate with WGA. So you can use this Windows Vista
Ultimate DVD ISO image to install any edition of Windows
Vista edition you want.


Mark H wrote:
> I know, it's a newsgroup and people write the darnedest things, but some
> calmly stick to their guns despite the turmoil and for that I believe
> they deserve respect. Those few seem to be granted MVP status of which
> Charlie Russel and Colin Barnhorst have the honor. Yes, they are human
> and can get upset, just like me, but they number hundreds of calm posts
> to my individual posts.
>
> So, I'm writing this outside the original post because I think I was
> wrong in my prior recommendations and owe Charlie and Colin an apology.
> Unfortunately, my recommendations are "out there", so consider this also
> a retraction. The title ties it to the most recent thread on the subject.
>
> I re-read the Vista EULA (end-user, not System Builder.)
> While I still believe that any product key is entitled to be used as
> 32-bit or 64-bit (IMO), I would have to state that the use of ABR may
> not be legal to migrate or re-install any version of Vista. As Charlie
> stated, it makes it "technically possible."
>
> While the use results in legally the same end product (without the
> bloatware), how ABR was written may have compromised the EULA in that
> reverse engineering would have been required to produce ABR. And,
> reverse engineering Vista is definitively illegal. I will no longer
> support that program by recommendation until the creators of ABR are
> willing to dictate the procedure's creation is legal. (No matter their
> intentions.)
>
> In the future, I would recommend to only use the product key you
> purchased found on the bottom of the machine if you want to change
> bitness of your OEM operating system. This also means that you either
> get a 64-bit OEM version from the vendor, or you already have a retail
> version. This method of migration is supported by MS activation and
> validation.

 
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Charlie Russel - MVP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-27-2008
Not a problem.

--
Charlie.

"Mark H" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>I know, it's a newsgroup and people write the darnedest things, but some
>calmly stick to their guns despite the turmoil and for that I believe they
>deserve respect. Those few seem to be granted MVP status of which Charlie
>Russel and Colin Barnhorst have the honor. Yes, they are human and can get
>upset, just like me, but they number hundreds of calm posts to my
>individual posts.
>
> So, I'm writing this outside the original post because I think I was wrong
> in my prior recommendations and owe Charlie and Colin an apology.
> Unfortunately, my recommendations are "out there", so consider this also a
> retraction. The title ties it to the most recent thread on the subject.
>
> I re-read the Vista EULA (end-user, not System Builder.)
> While I still believe that any product key is entitled to be used as
> 32-bit or 64-bit (IMO), I would have to state that the use of ABR may not
> be legal to migrate or re-install any version of Vista. As Charlie stated,
> it makes it "technically possible."
>
> While the use results in legally the same end product (without the
> bloatware), how ABR was written may have compromised the EULA in that
> reverse engineering would have been required to produce ABR. And, reverse
> engineering Vista is definitively illegal. I will no longer support that
> program by recommendation until the creators of ABR are willing to dictate
> the procedure's creation is legal. (No matter their intentions.)
>
> In the future, I would recommend to only use the product key you purchased
> found on the bottom of the machine if you want to change bitness of your
> OEM operating system. This also means that you either get a 64-bit OEM
> version from the vendor, or you already have a retail version. This method
> of migration is supported by MS activation and validation.


 
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