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Wireless security

 
 
Joe J.
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      07-26-2008
As I have previously posted, I have a Sprint Broadband card plugged into a
Kyocera router and then have two hard-wired desktops running from that. I
had the wireless portion of the router disabled. We have company for the
next few days and they wanted wireless access for their laptop. I went into
the router and turned on the wireless and they now have access but on an
unsecured connection. Do I need to worry about that for just a few days?
As long as their laptop has a firewall does it matter?

Thanks,
Joe J


 
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Boscoe
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      07-26-2008

"Joe J." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:9tFik.19105$(E-Mail Removed)...
> As I have previously posted, I have a Sprint Broadband card plugged into a
> Kyocera router and then have two hard-wired desktops running from that. I
> had the wireless portion of the router disabled. We have company for the
> next few days and they wanted wireless access for their laptop. I went
> into the router and turned on the wireless and they now have access but on
> an unsecured connection. Do I need to worry about that for just a few
> days? As long as their laptop has a firewall does it matter?
>
> Thanks,
> Joe J
>


The thing is with wireless networks is they announce their presence to
anyone within range by constantly broadcasting an identity beacon called a
Service Set Identifier [SSID]. I am in range of four of my immediate
neighboursí Wi-Fi networks, two of which remain completely unprotected.
IMHO, Wi-Fi security should be switched on at all times. The only exceptions
are during the initial setup, briefly when troubleshooting a faulty
connection or if you take your laptop on the road and need to be able to log
on to access points or wireless hot spots.


 
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Jeff Strickland
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      07-26-2008
You probably have no problems for a short time, but you can secure your
wireless with a click on the right checkbox.

You can name your router with a user-friendly name instead of the default
name, and then change the password needed to connect from the hex-decimal (0
thru 9, plus A thru F) address that is currently assigned to a user-friendly
password that has the same constraints. (You can simply notate the default
address and keep it in your desk drawer so travelling laptops that are
paying you an authorized visit can log onto your router, or you can create a
password that consists of 10 characters in the range of 0123456789abcdef
that is easy for you to remember.)

If you secure your router, then any visitor can get in when you tell them
the password, and anybody else will have to spend far too much time trying
to crack the code to make it worth while. And, even if they can get into the
router, unless you have set your hard drive as a shared resource, hackers
sitting in the street outside your house can't get past the router anyhow.





"Joe J." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:9tFik.19105$(E-Mail Removed)...
> As I have previously posted, I have a Sprint Broadband card plugged into a
> Kyocera router and then have two hard-wired desktops running from that. I
> had the wireless portion of the router disabled. We have company for the
> next few days and they wanted wireless access for their laptop. I went
> into the router and turned on the wireless and they now have access but on
> an unsecured connection. Do I need to worry about that for just a few
> days? As long as their laptop has a firewall does it matter?
>
> Thanks,
> Joe J
>


 
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NatarriB@gmail.com
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-27-2008
On Jul 26, 6:16 am, "Joe J." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> As I have previously posted, I have a Sprint Broadband card plugged into a
> Kyocera router and then have two hard-wired desktops running from that. I
> had the wireless portion of the router disabled. We have company for the
> next few days and they wanted wireless access for their laptop. I went into
> the router and turned on the wireless and they now have access but on an
> unsecured connection. Do I need to worry about that for just a few days?
> As long as their laptop has a firewall does it matter?
>
> Thanks,
> Joe J


yes it does matter. Dont give anybody the chance to hack into your
network. It only takes small steps to stop a BIG problem from
occuring. Go ahead and secure your wireless network and you (for the
most part) wont have to worry about unknown people connecting.
 
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Jeff Strickland
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      07-27-2008

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Jul 26, 6:16 am, "Joe J." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> As I have previously posted, I have a Sprint Broadband card plugged into
>> a
>> Kyocera router and then have two hard-wired desktops running from that.
>> I
>> had the wireless portion of the router disabled. We have company for the
>> next few days and they wanted wireless access for their laptop. I went
>> into
>> the router and turned on the wireless and they now have access but on an
>> unsecured connection. Do I need to worry about that for just a few days?
>> As long as their laptop has a firewall does it matter?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Joe J

>
> yes it does matter. Dont give anybody the chance to hack into your
> network. It only takes small steps to stop a BIG problem from
> occuring. Go ahead and secure your wireless network and you (for the
> most part) wont have to worry about unknown people connecting.





My network is secured.

As a practical matter, having an unsecured network only allows freeloaders
to use your Internet connection. The freeloaders can't get onto any of the
machines that are tied to the router, can they?

I had several neighbors with unsecured networks for so long that I cancelled
the phone service I used for dial up. I could not get past the router to
snoop around inside their network, all I could do is get on the 'net using
their dime. The issue is more of a theivery thing than a security problem. I
was a broadband-deadbeat for well over a year before I got my own
connection, and stealing bandwidth is all I could do.






 
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Boscoe
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      07-27-2008

"Jeff Strickland" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:g6id26$o2i$(E-Mail Removed)...

> My network is secured.
>
> As a practical matter, having an unsecured network only allows freeloaders
> to use your Internet connection. The freeloaders can't get onto any of the
> machines that are tied to the router, can they?
>
> I had several neighbors with unsecured networks for so long that I
> cancelled the phone service I used for dial up. I could not get past the
> router to snoop around inside their network, all I could do is get on the
> 'net using their dime. The issue is more of a theivery thing than a
> security problem. I was a broadband-deadbeat for well over a year before I
> got my own connection, and stealing bandwidth is all I could do.
>
>


So, how come a few years ago a minor cult grew up out of the terrifying lack
of security measures employed by many companies and the growing number of
home wireless network users. 'Warchalkers', as they were known, roamed the
streets ('wardriving') looking for unprotected wireless access points or
routers. When they found one they used chalk marks to identify the premises
to their fellows and publicised the information on the Internet. Yes, for
the most part they confined their activities to gaining free Internet access
but there are plenty of examples of open wireless systems being hacked into
by crooks and vandals.


 
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Baron
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      07-27-2008
Jeff Strickland wrote:
> My network is secured.
>
> As a practical matter, having an unsecured network only allows
> freeloaders to use your Internet connection. The freeloaders can't get
> onto any of the machines that are tied to the router, can they?


You may think so ! I couldn't possibly comment !

> I had several neighbors with unsecured networks for so long that I
> cancelled the phone service I used for dial up. I could not get past
> the router to snoop around inside their network, all I could do is get
> on the 'net using their dime. The issue is more of a theivery thing
> than a security problem. I was a broadband-deadbeat for well over a
> year before I got my own connection, and stealing bandwidth is all I
> could do.


--
Best Regards:
Baron.
 
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Jeff Strickland
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      07-27-2008

"Baron" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:g6ihcg$5h5$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Jeff Strickland wrote:
>> My network is secured.
>>
>> As a practical matter, having an unsecured network only allows
>> freeloaders to use your Internet connection. The freeloaders can't get
>> onto any of the machines that are tied to the router, can they?

>
> You may think so ! I couldn't possibly comment !
>


What makes you even bother posting **** like that?







 
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NatarriB@gmail.com
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-29-2008
On Jul 27, 10:59 am, "Jeff Strickland" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>
>
> > On Jul 26, 6:16 am, "Joe J." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >> As I have previously posted, I have a Sprint Broadband card plugged into
> >> a
> >> Kyocera router and then have two hard-wired desktops running from that.
> >> I
> >> had the wireless portion of the router disabled. We have company for the
> >> next few days and they wanted wireless access for their laptop. I went
> >> into
> >> the router and turned on the wireless and they now have access but on an
> >> unsecured connection. Do I need to worry about that for just a few days?
> >> As long as their laptop has a firewall does it matter?

>
> >> Thanks,
> >> Joe J

>
> > yes it does matter. Dont give anybody the chance to hack into your
> > network. It only takes small steps to stop a BIG problem from
> > occuring. Go ahead and secure your wireless network and you (for the
> > most part) wont have to worry about unknown people connecting.

>
> My network is secured.
>
> As a practical matter, having an unsecured network only allows freeloaders
> to use your Internet connection. The freeloaders can't get onto any of the
> machines that are tied to the router, can they?
>
> I had several neighbors with unsecured networks for so long that I cancelled
> the phone service I used for dial up. I could not get past the router to
> snoop around inside their network, all I could do is get on the 'net using
> their dime. The issue is more of a theivery thing than a security problem. I
> was a broadband-deadbeat for well over a year before I got my own
> connection, and stealing bandwidth is all I could do.



As a practical matter, having an unsecured network only allows
freeloaders
> to use your Internet connection. The freeloaders can't get onto any of the

machines that are tied to the router, can they? ---

who told you that? Having a unsecured network puts your entire
network at risk, not just your internet connection. Stealing your
internet would be a obvious thing to do, but they also could get
inside the system. Meaning everything (files, folders, ect.) they have
access to. And yes they can get access to the router. If someone gets
into your router then they have total access to your network. They
could redirect your packets to anywhere. They could poke holes in your
firewall and all other sots of stuff. So please secure your network.
 
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Jeff Strickland
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-29-2008

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Jul 27, 10:59 am, "Jeff Strickland" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>
>>
>>
>> > On Jul 26, 6:16 am, "Joe J." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> >> As I have previously posted, I have a Sprint Broadband card plugged
>> >> into
>> >> a
>> >> Kyocera router and then have two hard-wired desktops running from
>> >> that.
>> >> I
>> >> had the wireless portion of the router disabled. We have company for
>> >> the
>> >> next few days and they wanted wireless access for their laptop. I
>> >> went
>> >> into
>> >> the router and turned on the wireless and they now have access but on
>> >> an
>> >> unsecured connection. Do I need to worry about that for just a few
>> >> days?
>> >> As long as their laptop has a firewall does it matter?

>>
>> >> Thanks,
>> >> Joe J

>>
>> > yes it does matter. Dont give anybody the chance to hack into your
>> > network. It only takes small steps to stop a BIG problem from
>> > occuring. Go ahead and secure your wireless network and you (for the
>> > most part) wont have to worry about unknown people connecting.

>>
>> My network is secured.
>>
>> As a practical matter, having an unsecured network only allows
>> freeloaders
>> to use your Internet connection. The freeloaders can't get onto any of
>> the
>> machines that are tied to the router, can they?
>>
>> I had several neighbors with unsecured networks for so long that I
>> cancelled
>> the phone service I used for dial up. I could not get past the router to
>> snoop around inside their network, all I could do is get on the 'net
>> using
>> their dime. The issue is more of a theivery thing than a security
>> problem. I
>> was a broadband-deadbeat for well over a year before I got my own
>> connection, and stealing bandwidth is all I could do.

>
>
> As a practical matter, having an unsecured network only allows
> freeloaders
>> to use your Internet connection. The freeloaders can't get onto any of
>> the

> machines that are tied to the router, can they? ---
>
> who told you that?


Nobody told me. I tried to see into my neighbor's machines, but since I was
not part of their workgroup, all I could do was get onto the Internet. This
is what prompted my question.




Having a unsecured network puts your entire
> network at risk, not just your internet connection. Stealing your
> internet would be a obvious thing to do, but they also could get
> inside the system. Meaning everything (files, folders, ect.) they have
> access to. And yes they can get access to the router. If someone gets
> into your router then they have total access to your network. They
> could redirect your packets to anywhere. They could poke holes in your
> firewall and all other sots of stuff. So please secure your network.


My network is secure.

What I'm trying to understand is the mechanism that might be employed to get
past an unsecured wireless router. I can't even get into other machines on
my own network if the drives are not set as Shared. I can open the router
and see all of the machines that are connected to it, but I can't get from
the router to any of those machines. I have to open Network Places to see
those machines, and then I can only go to the Shared resources.

When I was a broadband deadbeat, I could go to the IP address of the router,
and (if I worked at it long enough) get past the Username and Password,
which at best would display the other devices connected to it. I could not
get into those devices. So, my limited experience says that the router might
be an access point to the Internet, I could not get to the private network
that my neighbor had set up.

Now that I'm no longer a broadband deadbeat, and I keep my router secured,
this is more of a rhetorical question meant to provide a learning experience
for me.

Perhaps my weakness is the tool I use to test my own theory. I can enter the
IP address of a machine connected to my router, but I don't get anywhere as
a result. There is a report that the address is wrong, but a PING of the
address is successful.







 
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