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Distributing Java Source

 
 
Roedy Green
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      07-23-2008
1. is there any format considered more vanilla than ZIP for
distributing Java source?

2. If you distribute source via a Version control system, which is the
preferred one for Java multiplatform?

3. Is there a place where I can post my source in a vcs for free or
cheaply? SourceForge turned me down because of my "non-miltary use"
restriction. My ISP is always too busy to do the work to let me set
up my own server.


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Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
The Java Glossary
http://mindprod.com
 
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Thomas Kellerer
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      07-23-2008
Roedy Green, 23.07.2008 14:21:
> 1. is there any format considered more vanilla than ZIP for
> distributing Java source?


JAR file?

Although that is essentially the same as a ZIP file, it is "built into" Java.

So you can be sure that anyone who has the JDK installed (otherwise he/she wouldn't be interested in the sources, right?) can un-jar it, even if no "ZIP utilitiy" is installed on that system

Thomas
 
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Tom Anderson
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      07-23-2008
On Wed, 23 Jul 2008, Roedy Green wrote:

> 1. is there any format considered more vanilla than ZIP for distributing
> Java source?


Not that i'm aware of. I might be tempted to use a JAR, so i could
indicate version numbers and other things in the manifest, but that's not
a huge advantage.

> 2. If you distribute source via a Version control system, which is the
> preferred one for Java multiplatform?


For distribution, it's hard to beat CVS, since there are clients for every
platform under the sun, including plugins for IDEs, virtual filesystems,
etc, and it's very well-understood, and a well-established standard.
Subversion is a 'better CVS', but it doesn't yet have as wide support, i'd
say. The more radical changeset-oriented systems, like git, are only
really necessary if you're doing distributed, anarchic development, which
i think you aren't (since your development isn't distributed - i make no
comment as to its anarchicity!).

> 3. Is there a place where I can post my source in a vcs for free or
> cheaply? SourceForge turned me down because of my "non-miltary use"
> restriction. My ISP is always too busy to do the work to let me set up
> my own server.


I can't think of any off the top of my head that will let you use an
arbitrary license, as you would need to impose your non-military
restriction. You could work your way through this list and see if any
will, though:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compari...ing_facilities

tom

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We can only see a short distance ahead, but we can see plenty there that
needs to be done. -- Alan Turing
 
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David Segall
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      07-23-2008
Roedy Green <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Is there a place where I can post my source in a vcs for free or
>cheaply?

Try http://www.cheap-jsp-hosting.com/. Dave Miller
<(E-Mail Removed)> seems keen to cooperate with
active Java programmers and, I believe, recently gave some space to
Andrew Thompson <http://pscode.org/>. My only contact with them was an
enquiry about an addition to their supplied JVM. The reply was prompt
and offered a risk free (for me) solution.
> My ISP is always too busy to do the work to let me set
>up my own server.

I don't understand this bit. Unless your ISP is the host what have
they got to do with setting up your own server? On the other hand, if
they are willing to provide a free host, then I would keep nagging.
 
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Roedy Green
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      07-23-2008
On Wed, 23 Jul 2008 12:21:18 GMT, Roedy Green
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted
someone who said :

>1. is there any format considered more vanilla than ZIP for
>distributing Java source?
>
>2. If you distribute source via a Version control system, which is the
>preferred one for Java multiplatform?
>
>3. Is there a place where I can post my source in a vcs for free or
>cheaply? SourceForge turned me down because of my "non-miltary use"
>restriction. My ISP is always too busy to do the work to let me set
>up my own server.


I have summarised your collective wisdom at
http://mindprod.com/jgloss/distributingsource.html
--

Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
The Java Glossary
http://mindprod.com
 
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Dave Miller
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      07-23-2008
Daniel Dyer wrote:
> On Wed, 23 Jul 2008 15:15:35 +0100, David Segall <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>> Roedy Green <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> Is there a place where I can post my source in a vcs for free or
>>> cheaply?

>> Try http://www.cheap-jsp-hosting.com/. Dave Miller
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> seems keen to cooperate with
>> active Java programmers and, I believe, recently gave some space to
>> Andrew Thompson <http://pscode.org/>. My only contact with them was an
>> enquiry about an addition to their supplied JVM. The reply was prompt
>> and offered a risk free (for me) solution.
>>> My ISP is always too busy to do the work to let me set
>>> up my own server.

>> I don't understand this bit. Unless your ISP is the host what have
>> they got to do with setting up your own server? On the other hand, if
>> they are willing to provide a free host, then I would keep nagging.

>
> Another option is to pay for a VPS (Virtual Private Server). It's just
> like having your own dedicated machine but cheaper (you get a choice of
> OS, full root access, install whatever software you like and reboot
> whenever you feel like it). I use SliceHost and I'm very happy with
> their service. On a 256Mb slice I run Apache, Jetty and MySQL with no
> problems. VPSLink is an alternative provider that has lower spec slices
> available (from $7 a month), but I can't vouch for their service having
> never used it myself.
>
> SliceHost: https://manage.slicehost.com/custome...rrer=456685539
> (this is a referral link)
> VPSLink: http://vpslink.com/vps-hosting/
>
> Dan.
>

VPS used to be a midpoint between a managed environment and a full
dedicated server. Rather than a full dedicated at $100, you could buy a
quarter of a dedicated VPS at $40. That was then.

Now, in order to compete on price, some VPS providers are cutting
servers into extremely small pieces. When Dan buys a 256MB virtual
server he is buying, in essence, a computer with 256MB of total RAM. In
that there is no GUI to suck up power, that can work (as Dan attests).
When other vendors try to cut that down further (a 64MB computer?)
they're either trying to kid the customers or they're kidding themselves.

It comes down to how much you want to be involved in customizing the
server and maintaining it. MB for MB managed hosting is cheaper than VPS
and removes the need to do maintenance, security updates, etc. VPS gives
you a totally customized experience as a practicing server admin.

--
Dave Miller
Java Web Hosting at:
http://www.cheap-jsp-hosting.com/
 
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thufir
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      07-23-2008
On Wed, 23 Jul 2008 12:21:18 +0000, Roedy Green wrote:

> 1. is there any format considered more vanilla than ZIP for distributing
> Java source?
>
> 2. If you distribute source via a Version control system, which is the
> preferred one for Java multiplatform?
>
> 3. Is there a place where I can post my source in a vcs for free or
> cheaply? SourceForge turned me down because of my "non-miltary use"
> restriction. My ISP is always too busy to do the work to let me set up
> my own server.
>



I like code.google.com, which is free, which uses subversion (similar to
cvs), but git seems popular (I don't know any git websites). Dunno about
the licensing, with google you have to select from a preset list. If the
license you want isn't there, then you can always request that from
google -- they seem pretty responsive and have a google group for
code.google.com stuff.

How much code do you have that it must be compressed? When you checkout
code from subversion there's no compression. If you're compressing, that
sounds like an opportunity for file corruption.



-Thufir
 
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thufir
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      07-23-2008
On Wed, 23 Jul 2008 14:36:30 +0200, Thomas Kellerer wrote:

> JAR file?
>
> Although that is essentially the same as a ZIP file, it is "built into"
> Java.



On that note, you can include the src directory when the jar is built, so
that, yes, the jar runs the app, but source can be extracted. ?


-Thufir
 
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Tom Anderson
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      07-23-2008
On Wed, 23 Jul 2008, thufir wrote:

> On Wed, 23 Jul 2008 12:21:18 +0000, Roedy Green wrote:
>
>> 1. is there any format considered more vanilla than ZIP for distributing
>> Java source?

>
> How much code do you have that it must be compressed?


I think the desire to use an archive file is more about having one single
file to distribute than about reducing size. Even then, reducing size is
useful - it might not make much difference to the downloader, but a 60%
reduction in file size also means a 60% reduction in Roedy's bandwidth
use, which could save him some dollars. And that's Canadian dollars, which
are really worth something!

> When you checkout code from subversion there's no compression. If
> you're compressing, that sounds like an opportunity for file corruption.


Oh really. And you've had that happen to you, have you?

A compressed file has better protection against external corruption than
an uncompressed one - there are fewer bits to be hit by cosmic rays or
other random processes, and all archive formats worth bothering with
include checksums, which will detect many kinds of corruption. An
increased chance of corruption could only come from a defective
implementation of the compressor or decompressor, and the simple fact is
that there aren't many such implementations in use in the wild.

tom

--
Is that dark pixel a prox mine or a bullet hole? HERE COME THE PROX MINE
SWEATS! -- D
 
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Roedy Green
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      07-23-2008
On Wed, 23 Jul 2008 14:15:35 GMT, David Segall <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :

>I don't understand this bit. Unless your ISP is the host what have
>they got to do with setting up your own server? On the other hand, if
>they are willing to provide a free host, then I would keep nagging.


At this point I have only static html serving, offered free. For me
to have the ability to set up my own code he has to do various changes
to ensure I don't screw up other clients.
--

Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
The Java Glossary
http://mindprod.com
 
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