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Re: Macro mode

 
 
David J Taylor
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      07-10-2008
Blinky the Shark wrote:
> David J Taylor wrote:

[]
>> Can you stop the flash from popping up on the D40 in "flower-icon"
>> mode?

>
> Speaking for the D60: yes; close-up mode allows you to select auto
> flash, auto with red-eye prevention, and no flash. I wasn't sure. I
> just tested.


Which menu? I did look briefly but didn't find it. Of course, it may be
new to the D60.

Thanks,
David


 
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Blinky the Shark
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      07-10-2008
David J Taylor wrote:

> Blinky the Shark wrote:
>> David J Taylor wrote:

> []
>>> Can you stop the flash from popping up on the D40 in "flower-icon"
>>> mode?

>>
>> Speaking for the D60: yes; close-up mode allows you to select auto
>> flash, auto with red-eye prevention, and no flash. I wasn't sure. I
>> just tested.

>
> Which menu? I did look briefly but didn't find it. Of course, it may be
> new to the D60.


There's a flash mode button on the left side of the prism area, just below
the popup part. When I press it while in close-up mode, I can spin the
command dial through those three selections, which show up in in the flash
mode box at the lower left corner of the LCD.


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David J Taylor
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      07-10-2008
Blinky the Shark wrote:
> David J Taylor wrote:
>
>> Blinky the Shark wrote:
>>> David J Taylor wrote:

>> []
>>>> Can you stop the flash from popping up on the D40 in "flower-icon"
>>>> mode?
>>>
>>> Speaking for the D60: yes; close-up mode allows you to select auto
>>> flash, auto with red-eye prevention, and no flash. I wasn't sure.
>>> I just tested.

>>
>> Which menu? I did look briefly but didn't find it. Of course, it
>> may be new to the D60.

>
> There's a flash mode button on the left side of the prism area, just
> below the popup part. When I press it while in close-up mode, I can
> spin the command dial through those three selections, which show up
> in in the flash mode box at the lower left corner of the LCD.


Thanks for that. Yes, it's same here. But even if I select No Flash, the
flash still pops up on close-up mode the next time I switch the camera on.
I was hoping the setting might persist when the camera was switched off.

Cheers,
David


 
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Cynicor
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      07-10-2008
David J Taylor wrote:
> Blinky the Shark wrote:
>> David J Taylor wrote:
>>
>>> Blinky the Shark wrote:
>>>> David J Taylor wrote:
>>> []
>>>>> Can you stop the flash from popping up on the D40 in "flower-icon"
>>>>> mode?
>>>> Speaking for the D60: yes; close-up mode allows you to select auto
>>>> flash, auto with red-eye prevention, and no flash. I wasn't sure.
>>>> I just tested.
>>> Which menu? I did look briefly but didn't find it. Of course, it
>>> may be new to the D60.

>> There's a flash mode button on the left side of the prism area, just
>> below the popup part. When I press it while in close-up mode, I can
>> spin the command dial through those three selections, which show up
>> in in the flash mode box at the lower left corner of the LCD.

>
> Thanks for that. Yes, it's same here. But even if I select No Flash, the
> flash still pops up on close-up mode the next time I switch the camera on.
> I was hoping the setting might persist when the camera was switched off.


Use a Nikon SG-31R and block the flash.
 
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David J Taylor
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      07-10-2008
Cynicor wrote:
[]
>> Thanks for that. Yes, it's same here. But even if I select No
>> Flash, the flash still pops up on close-up mode the next time I
>> switch the camera on. I was hoping the setting might persist when
>> the camera was switched off.

>
> Use a Nikon SG-31R and block the flash.


Cynicor, as I think you may know, I am a minimum bulk and weight person,
so any extras are out. Were I doing serious macro in the studio (i.e. at
home) it would be different, of course.

Cheers,
David


 
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me@mine.net
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      07-10-2008
On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 13:35:00 -0400, in rec.photo.digital "Neil
Harrington" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
>Metering II system with D or G type lenses, and "focus mode is always set to
>AF-A, which you will not be able to override." (I take that to mean, in AF
>mode you can't use the AF override feature on a lens with the M/A-M switch,
>which of course the D40 kit lenses don't have anyway.)


No. From p. 23 of the fine manual.

Focus mode Description
AF-A Auto-servo AF
(default setting)
Camera automatically selects single-servo autofocus when subject is
judged to be stationary, continuous-servo autofocus when subject is
judged to be moving. Shutter can be released if camera is able to
focus.

AF-S Single-servo AF
For stationary subjects. Focus locks when shutter-release button is
pressed halfway. Shutter can be released if camera is able to focus.

AF-C Continuousservo AF
For moving subjects. Camera focuses continuously while shutter-release
button is pressed halfway. Shutter can be released if camera is able
to focus.
 
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tony cooper
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      07-11-2008
On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 20:36:48 -0400, Alan Browne
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>It's amazing that this is a photography group and that the masses who
>subscribe to marketing pablum eat it up in the face of customary
>nomenclature, definition, experience and proven method and technique.


>"macro" is not a mode.


>"macro mode" is not macro photography.


What are you on about?

Some cameras have focus mode that is designated by a flower icon on
the mode dial and called the macro mode or the close-up mode in the
manual. It's a focus mode, and a "mode" in that it's one of several
choices of settings. I don't see anyone here in this photography
group insisting that photograph taken when the camera set to this
focus mode is a macro photograph.

If there are people among the general public who refer to the results
of images taken when the camera is set to this mode as "macro
photographs", they are wrong. I don't see it as an earth-shattering
problem but it this gnaws at you, so be it.

I'm sure if they ever wander into this group that you'll set them
straight.

>>Camera/lens makers who sell cheap goods with too much promise and too

>little delivery certainly do not change definition.


Cheap goods? "Cheap" has a connotation of "shoddy", but some camera
makers who call the focus mode setting designated by the flower icon
the "macro" setting are merely inexpensive. There may be some
expensive ones that do. I don't know, and I don't know what is
considered "expensive" or "inexpensive". That's all relative.

While my Nikon D40 doesn't, my Nikon Coolpix does identify the mode as
the "macro mode" in the index and the "macro close-up mode" on page
31. Under "When to use it", the manual says "Use for close-ups".
Nothing falsely promised there. It delivers what it does promise.
I was not misled when I bought it. I owned a designated macro lens
when I used 35mm film, and knew what to expect from the Coolpix.




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Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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tony cooper
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      07-11-2008
On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 16:04:10 -0400, Alan Browne
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>tony cooper wrote:
>
>> I was not misled when I bought it. I owned a designated macro lens
>> when I used 35mm film, and knew what to expect from the Coolpix.

>
>Keep playin' yer fiddle. Doesn't sell here.


I understand. It disturbs you to think that what you believe to be
your own special knowledge is commonly understood.


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Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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tony cooper
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      07-12-2008
On Sat, 12 Jul 2008 16:13:58 -0400, Alan Browne
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>tony cooper wrote:
>> On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 16:04:10 -0400, Alan Browne
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> tony cooper wrote:
>>>
>>>> I was not misled when I bought it. I owned a designated macro lens
>>>> when I used 35mm film, and knew what to expect from the Coolpix.
>>> Keep playin' yer fiddle. Doesn't sell here.

>>
>> I understand. It disturbs you to think that what you believe to be
>> your own special knowledge is commonly understood.

>
>Whatever Tony. I've got your number. You come here with the baggage of
>years and the influence of dabbling in too many things,


Neither the years nor the dabbling in many things are what I would
consider unwanted baggage.

>never being on top of any one thing.


And never with the desire to puff out my chest and profess expert
status in anything. Self-constructed pedestals are too fragile.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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Peter Irwin
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      07-13-2008
Neil Harrington <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Actually, NONE of the four you mentioned are really that good. Ordinary
> camera lenses on extension tubes or bellows may give satisfactory results
> when stopped down enough, at least for centrally placed subjects, but they
> are not designed to be used at anything like a 1:1 magnification and aren't
> likely to give good definition or flat field over the whole frame.


It depends on the lens. A 50/3.5 tessar type is very likely to
be satisfactory for the purpose. The Leitz Elmar 50/3.5 made
a quite decent enlarging lens (the historical reason why enlarger
lens mounts are very often LTM) and was quite usable for 1:1 and
larger if stopped down to middle stops. My Asahi Pentax Manual
notes that the SMC Takumar 55/1.8 is much better for close-up
work than the 50/1.4.

True macro lenses such as the B&L Micro-Tessars and the Leitz
Micro-Summars certainly did exist in the 1930s if not earlier,
but it was quite usual to use the standard lenses for macro-work.
The old Leica Manuals mention the availability of the micro-summar
lenses, but have entire chapters on using the Elmar and other standard
lenses for the purpose.

My 35mm f/2.4 CZJ lens will focus down to a 1:2 ratio and seems
remarkably good for close-up work.
>
> As you say, they're "not very sharp" -- especially the +20 close-up lens it
> would take to reach 1:1 with a 50mm prime lens.


It wouldn't take quite that much because a typical 50 mm lens for
an SLR has about 1 cm worth of focus extension: it would only take
about a +13 lens. More practical is a +4 achromat on a 135mm lens.
It wouldn't likely get you quite up to 1:1 unless your 135 is
unusually close focussing, but it will get you close and will be
quite satisfactory in use.

Peter.
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http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)

 
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