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Router power consumption

 
 
ML
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      07-05-2008
Is the signal strength of a router depends on the router's power consumption?
To compare a router that uses 3.3V and one that uses 12V. Does this mean
that the 12V one can give stronger signal and support more wireless clients?

Tks.
 
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Jack \(MVP-Networking\).
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-05-2008
Hi
The DC power supply voltage has noting to do with the RF output.
The RF output is rated in mW (milliWatts). The typical RF output of almost
all the Entry Level Wireless Devices is about 33mW regardless of their power
supply rating.
There are more expensive devices that are rated as High Power, and provide
up to 100mW.
Number of clients has to do more with the Bandwidth than the power.
May be this can further help.
..Extending Distance - http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html
Wireless Router as an Access Point - http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
Wireless Modes - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Modes.html
Wireless Bridging - http://www.ezlan.net/bridging.html
Hi Gain Antenna - http://www.ezlan.net/antennae.html
Network Bandwidth (Speed) - http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
How many concurrent users can surf the Internet through the same Wireless
Connection - http://www.ezlan.net/faq.html#wconcurrent
Jack (MVP-Networking).


"ML" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Is the signal strength of a router depends on the router's power
> consumption?
> To compare a router that uses 3.3V and one that uses 12V. Does this mean
> that the 12V one can give stronger signal and support more wireless
> clients?
>
> Tks.


 
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ML
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-06-2008
Hello

So it is okay to attach a 5dBi antenna to this router that uses 3.3V?
Would the router able to support it since it is using such low power
consumption?
I need to confirm this with the experts.

Tks.

"Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:

> Hi
> The DC power supply voltage has noting to do with the RF output.
> The RF output is rated in mW (milliWatts). The typical RF output of almost
> all the Entry Level Wireless Devices is about 33mW regardless of their power
> supply rating.
> There are more expensive devices that are rated as High Power, and provide
> up to 100mW.
> Number of clients has to do more with the Bandwidth than the power.
> May be this can further help.
> ..Extending Distance - http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html
> Wireless Router as an Access Point - http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
> Wireless Modes - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Modes.html
> Wireless Bridging - http://www.ezlan.net/bridging.html
> Hi Gain Antenna - http://www.ezlan.net/antennae.html
> Network Bandwidth (Speed) - http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
> How many concurrent users can surf the Internet through the same Wireless
> Connection - http://www.ezlan.net/faq.html#wconcurrent
> Jack (MVP-Networking).
>



 
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Jack \(MVP-Networking\).
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-06-2008
Hi
Yeah, it very good idea to attach better Antenna.
3.3V is the voltage Not the power. The power is W = I X V (Watt= 1A x
1Volt).
An electrical device that uses 3.3V and source 1 A provides Power of
3.3Watts.
An electrical device that uses 6.6V and source .5 A provides Power of
3.3Watts.
I.e. Different Voltage, but both devices provide the same power. The choice
of the Voltage is a design choice and Not a direct issue of Power.
Jack (MVP-Networking).

"ML" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hello
>
> So it is okay to attach a 5dBi antenna to this router that uses 3.3V?
> Would the router able to support it since it is using such low power
> consumption?
> I need to confirm this with the experts.
>
> Tks.
>
> "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
>
>> Hi
>> The DC power supply voltage has noting to do with the RF output.
>> The RF output is rated in mW (milliWatts). The typical RF output of
>> almost
>> all the Entry Level Wireless Devices is about 33mW regardless of their
>> power
>> supply rating.
>> There are more expensive devices that are rated as High Power, and
>> provide
>> up to 100mW.
>> Number of clients has to do more with the Bandwidth than the power.
>> May be this can further help.
>> ..Extending Distance - http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html
>> Wireless Router as an Access Point - http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
>> Wireless Modes - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Modes.html
>> Wireless Bridging - http://www.ezlan.net/bridging.html
>> Hi Gain Antenna - http://www.ezlan.net/antennae.html
>> Network Bandwidth (Speed) - http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
>> How many concurrent users can surf the Internet through the same Wireless
>> Connection - http://www.ezlan.net/faq.html#wconcurrent
>> Jack (MVP-Networking).
>>

>
>


 
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w_tom
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-07-2008
On Jul 5, 10:52*pm, ML <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> So it is okay to attach a 5dBi antenna to this router that uses 3.3V?
> Would the router able to support it since it is using such low power
> consumption?


RF output power does not change with the antenna. That antenna
would direct more power in one direction - less power in another
direction.
 
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Phillip Windell
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-07-2008
Output power is regulated by the FCC in the US. I'm sure there are other
"entities" that regulate them in other countries.

The "gain" of an antenna is the ability of the antenna itself to improve
efficiency all by itself with the existing power it is already given.
Yes,..you can use the antenna, but as some others have mentioned it may be
"directional".

--
Phillip Windell
www.wandtv.com

The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
-----------------------------------------------------

"ML" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hello
>
> So it is okay to attach a 5dBi antenna to this router that uses 3.3V?
> Would the router able to support it since it is using such low power
> consumption?
> I need to confirm this with the experts.
>
> Tks.
>
> "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
>
>> Hi
>> The DC power supply voltage has noting to do with the RF output.
>> The RF output is rated in mW (milliWatts). The typical RF output of
>> almost
>> all the Entry Level Wireless Devices is about 33mW regardless of their
>> power
>> supply rating.
>> There are more expensive devices that are rated as High Power, and
>> provide
>> up to 100mW.
>> Number of clients has to do more with the Bandwidth than the power.
>> May be this can further help.
>> ..Extending Distance - http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html
>> Wireless Router as an Access Point - http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
>> Wireless Modes - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Modes.html
>> Wireless Bridging - http://www.ezlan.net/bridging.html
>> Hi Gain Antenna - http://www.ezlan.net/antennae.html
>> Network Bandwidth (Speed) - http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
>> How many concurrent users can surf the Internet through the same Wireless
>> Connection - http://www.ezlan.net/faq.html#wconcurrent
>> Jack (MVP-Networking).
>>

>
>



 
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