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Re: Photography restrictions in London

 
 
Nervous Nick
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      06-25-2008
On Jun 25, 4:04*pm, Alfred Molon <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> What restrictions are there for photography in public places in London?
> --


You almost definitely will be detained if you set up a tripod and
start taking photos in the Tube. I have not been to London since
1990, but when I was there (as a journalist with credentials) I was
stopped from taking photos at one of the stations (I think it was
Bank, and was using a tripod) and told that I would have to get
"permission" from London Transport. If I hadn't had credentials, I
wonder whether the cops might have been a little less polite.

I would have looked into the matter further, but I was pretty much
just stopping over at London on my way back to Chicago from shooting
in Belfast (pardon the pun), and was due to return to Chicago in a
couple of days.

I am sure they are a bit more paranoid these days than they were
eighteen years ago.

You might find this link helpful:

http://www.urban75.org/photos/photog...d-the-law.html

--
YOP...

 
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michael adams
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      06-25-2008

"Nervous Nick" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
On Jun 25, 4:04 pm, Alfred Molon <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> What restrictions are there for photography in public places in London?
> --


- You almost definitely will be detained if you set up a tripod and
- start taking photos in the Tube.


As with tripods almost anywhere including museums, the main concern is
with members of the public tripping over them. And the resulting
liability issues. More especially on station platforms.


-I have not been to London since
-1990, but when I was there (as a journalist with credentials) I was
-stopped from taking photos at one of the stations (I think it was
-Bank, and was using a tripod) and told that I would have to get
-"permission" from London Transport. If I hadn't had credentials, I
-wonder whether the cops might have been a little less polite.



That's simply because London Transport's public liability insurance
doesn't cover accidents to passengers as result of their tripping over
tripods being used by amateurs. If you made a prior arrangement with LT
(again as with museums) and paid a fee they would possibly have arranged
to have a member of staff on hand to assist you, and log your visit so
as to come under the terms of their liability insurance. They may also
assume that if you're using a tripod then the photographs are to be
used for commercial purposes, and may wish to charge you a fee on
that basis as well.



michael adams

....

-I would have looked into the matter further, but I was pretty much
-just stopping over at London on my way back to Chicago from shooting
-in Belfast (pardon the pun), and was due to return to Chicago in a
- couple of days.

-I am sure they are a bit more paranoid these days than they were
-eighteen years ago.

-You might find this link helpful:

http://www.urban75.org/photos/photog...d-the-law.html

--
YOP...


 
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Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-26-2008

Ο "michael adams" <(E-Mail Removed)> έγραψε στο μήνυμα
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "Nervous Nick" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Jun 25, 4:04 pm, Alfred Molon <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> What restrictions are there for photography in public places in London?
>> --

>
> - You almost definitely will be detained if you set up a tripod and
> - start taking photos in the Tube.
>
>
> As with tripods almost anywhere including museums, the main concern is
> with members of the public tripping over them. And the resulting
> liability issues. More especially on station platforms.
>
>
> -I have not been to London since
> -1990, but when I was there (as a journalist with credentials) I was
> -stopped from taking photos at one of the stations (I think it was
> -Bank, and was using a tripod) and told that I would have to get
> -"permission" from London Transport. If I hadn't had credentials, I
> -wonder whether the cops might have been a little less polite.
>
>
>
> That's simply because London Transport's public liability insurance
> doesn't cover accidents to passengers as result of their tripping over
> tripods being used by amateurs. If you made a prior arrangement with LT
> (again as with museums) and paid a fee they would possibly have arranged
> to have a member of staff on hand to assist you, and log your visit so
> as to come under the terms of their liability insurance. They may also
> assume that if you're using a tripod then the photographs are to be
> used for commercial purposes, and may wish to charge you a fee on
> that basis as well.
>
>
>
> michael adams
>
> ...
>
> -I would have looked into the matter further, but I was pretty much
> -just stopping over at London on my way back to Chicago from shooting
> -in Belfast (pardon the pun), and was due to return to Chicago in a
> - couple of days.
>
> -I am sure they are a bit more paranoid these days than they were
> -eighteen years ago.
>

I asked for a premission in the train station of Munich, Germany in the mid
90s (ist es erlaubt im Bahnhof zu fotografieren) to a fat conductor, and the
answer was a hearty ja.(I think he minded more about my German than me
taking photos). I shoot one of my best photos, the 111 freight E-Lok
(Elektrische Lokomotive) lit up with rays of light coming down from the
station's roof. Unfortunately, it's a slide, so I can't post it I have
another, with a polish friend looking down a train bridge when just then the
ICE (InterCity Express) passes with 200 km/h. I always was fascinated by
trains, and the Germans used to be very friendly, especially if you speak
their own language.



--
Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
major in electrical engineering
mechanized infantry reservist
hordad AT otenet DOT gr


 
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Chris H
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      06-27-2008
In message <(E-Mail Removed)>, Russell D.
<(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>Tzortzakakis Dimitrios wrote:
>
>> trains, and the Germans used to be very friendly, especially if you
>>speak their own language.
>>

>
>I'm curious why you say "used to be?" It has been twenty five years
>since I've been to Europe (I need to rectify that.) and found the
>German people to very friendly and helpful. The same with the Austrians
>and Swiss.


I have had no problems with the Germans I still find then friendly at
least the three companies I deal with on a weekly basis.

> Now, the French . . .


French or Parisians?

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/



 
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Ofnuts
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      06-27-2008
Russell D. wrote:
>
> Come to think of it, it was Paris. Rode all night on a train from Bern
> to Paris. In the middle of the train station is a large booth with the
> word "Information" in several different languages plastered all over it.
> Do you think we could get any information from the occupants of that
> booth. Well, not in English.


From experience, you don't get any in French, either... The purpose of
tis box ois to make you look for information there, and not distract the
SNCF employees from their nap with your questions.

--
Bertrand
 
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Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
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      06-27-2008

? "Russell D." <(E-Mail Removed)> ?????? ??? ??????
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Tzortzakakis Dimitrios wrote:
>
>> trains, and the Germans used to be very friendly, especially if you speak
>> their own language.
>>
>>
>>

>
> I'm curious why you say "used to be?" It has been twenty five years since
> I've been to Europe (I need to rectify that.) and found the German people
> to very friendly and helpful. The same with the Austrians and Swiss. Now,
> the French . . .
>

because I haven't been in Germany since then, (mid '90s). I admire the
French very much, because they have built TGV (Tren de Grand Vitesse) which
is a train that runs up to 300 km/h, and now AGV (Automotrisse de Grand
Vitesse), I'd like to visit France one day, when I improve my French, and
maybe Japan.


--
Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
major in electrical engineering
mechanized infantry reservist
hordad AT otenet DOT gr


 
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David J Taylor
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      06-27-2008
Tzortzakakis Dimitrios wrote:
[]
> because I haven't been in Germany since then, (mid '90s). I admire the
> French very much, because they have built TGV (Tren de Grand Vitesse)
> which is a train that runs up to 300 km/h, and now AGV (Automotrisse
> de Grand Vitesse), I'd like to visit France one day, when I improve
> my French, and maybe Japan.


I would recommend Japan over France, as it is more of a culture shift.
You may not even be able to read the signs, let alone understand the
language.... The society is somewhat removed from Western ideas.

You can take great photos in both countries, though.

Cheers,
David


 
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Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-28-2008

Ο "David J Taylor"
<(E-Mail Removed)-this-bit.nor-this-bit.co.uk> έγραψε στο
μήνυμα news:AI99k.16842$(E-Mail Removed) m...
> Tzortzakakis Dimitrios wrote:
> []
>> because I haven't been in Germany since then, (mid '90s). I admire the
>> French very much, because they have built TGV (Tren de Grand Vitesse)
>> which is a train that runs up to 300 km/h, and now AGV (Automotrisse
>> de Grand Vitesse), I'd like to visit France one day, when I improve
>> my French, and maybe Japan.

>
> I would recommend Japan over France, as it is more of a culture shift. You
> may not even be able to read the signs, let alone understand the
> language.... The society is somewhat removed from Western ideas.
>
> You can take great photos in both countries, though.
>

I've been studying japanese for 10 years, that's why I plan to visit japan
someday. I hope I'll have learned enough to read the signs, although being
fluent in japanese is very hard (lack of teachers and schools, so you'll
have to teach yourself). I even have spoken in japanese woth a couple of
tourists here, who were pleasantly surprised FWIW. French is much easier,
though. eg a washing machine in japanese is sentakuki, a camera kamera, a
door doa and so on, many english loan words. The japanese have their strange
ethics with the bows, even close relatives don' t shake hands or hug each
other, but this isn't coldness, the depth of the bow means the level of
joy/politeness. The use of you "anata" or the use of the "rude" form of
verbs Sit! in contrast to Please sit, sir, can be extremely rude, so one
must be careful.(For example, suwu sit! is so rude it's unheard of, suwatte
kudasai please sit down is the polite form of sit and kudasai please, and
even more polite suwatte kudasaimasen ka, would you please sit down, sir?)
Now about the photos, well the shinkansen (the bullet train) is something
I'd always like to see, let alone travel in it. It goes without saying, that
I'll go to Kioto and wear a yukata and geta (a cotton robe, not dissimilar
to a kimono;a kimono is very expensive and impossible to wear without proper
training;geta are the slippers worn with a yukata, usually when relaxing).
In Kioto wearers of traditional japanese clothing travel for free in public
transport, japanese or not. Although, I'd rather not eat blowfish (the one
that when's not prepared correctly kills you) but I'd say yes to a good
plate of tempura (fried shrimps). The easy thing with japanese is that what
you're gonna say is pretty much standard, directed by courtesy, and usually
all native speakers would say the same, and it has very few pictogramms,
only 3000, while Chinese has over 50000.


--
Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
major in electrical engineering
mechanized infantry reservist
hordad AT otenet DOT gr


 
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Cal I Fornicate
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-29-2008
Alfred Molon wrote:
> In article <g45v0b$cb5$(E-Mail Removed)>, Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
> says...
>> I've been studying japanese for 10 years, that's why I plan to visit japan
>> someday. I hope I'll have learned enough to read the signs, although being
>> fluent in japanese is very hard (lack of teachers and schools, so you'll
>> have to teach yourself).

>
> You don't need any knowledge of Japanese in order to visit Japan.


Yeah, the girl's gonna say no regardless of what language you ask in.

Cal

 
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David J Taylor
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      07-01-2008
Tzortzakakis Dimitrios wrote:
[]
> I've been studying japanese for 10 years, that's why I plan to visit
> japan someday. I hope I'll have learned enough to read the signs,
> although being fluent in japanese is very hard (lack of teachers and
> schools, so you'll have to teach yourself). I even have spoken in
> japanese woth a couple of tourists here, who were pleasantly
> surprised FWIW.


Wow - I think that takes a lot of dedication.....

> French is much easier, though. eg a washing machine
> in japanese is sentakuki, a camera kamera, a door doa and so on, many
> english loan words. The japanese have their strange ethics with the
> bows, even close relatives don' t shake hands or hug each other, but
> this isn't coldness, the depth of the bow means the level of
> joy/politeness.


Even just as a non-Japanese speaking tourist, it was that difference in
the society which really stood out to me. Unfortunately, I had no idea
how rude I was being.....

> The use of you "anata" or the use of the "rude" form
> of verbs Sit! in contrast to Please sit, sir, can be extremely rude,
> so one must be careful.(For example, suwu sit! is so rude it's
> unheard of, suwatte kudasai please sit down is the polite form of sit
> and kudasai please, and even more polite suwatte kudasaimasen ka,
> would you please sit down, sir?) Now about the photos, well the
> shinkansen (the bullet train) is something I'd always like to see,
> let alone travel in it.


Yes, that was a great experience!

> It goes without saying, that I'll go to Kioto
> and wear a yukata and geta (a cotton robe, not dissimilar to a
> kimono;a kimono is very expensive and impossible to wear without
> proper training;geta are the slippers worn with a yukata, usually
> when relaxing). In Kioto wearers of traditional japanese clothing
> travel for free in public transport, japanese or not. Although, I'd
> rather not eat blowfish (the one that when's not prepared correctly
> kills you) but I'd say yes to a good plate of tempura (fried
> shrimps). The easy thing with japanese is that what you're gonna say
> is pretty much standard, directed by courtesy, and usually all native
> speakers would say the same, and it has very few pictogramms, only
> 3000, while Chinese has over 50000.


We went to a great Tempura restaurant in Kyoto - and apart from the wine
choice, we could only decide by price! 6000, 8000 or 12000 Yen (if I
recall correctly). Sitting directly across from the cook was an
experience - he paced his cooking to our eating. And I don't think I've
ever had such fresh and crispy food!

For someone from the West, like me, an Eastern culture is a lot more
interesting that a town in France or Germany, although we do like
Scandinavia.

Thanks for your most interesting response.

Cheers,
David


 
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