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Light meter/dslr

 
 
tony cooper
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      06-13-2008
Does anyone use a light meter with their DSLR?

I can't find my old Gossen from my 35mm days, so I generally switch to
Automatic on my Nikon D40, look at the setting, and then go Manual and
set a combination from that reading.

What are others doing?



--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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ASAAR
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      06-13-2008
On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 22:28:57 -0400, tony cooper wrote:

> I can't find my old Gossen from my 35mm days, so I generally switch to
> Automatic on my Nikon D40, look at the setting, and then go Manual and
> set a combination from that reading.
>
> What are others doing?


Pretty much the same, but as the shots generally call for an
approximate shutter speed or aperture, instead of starting with
Automatic (P) mode, I'll adjust one of the settings in S or A mode
and see what the camera suggests for the other exposure setting.

I've only used cameras that when switched to M mode, revert to the
last M settings, a nice feature to add (unless I've not noticed it
in the cameras I've used) would be a way to easily transfer P/A/S
mode exposure settings to M mode. One way might be to Dial up M
mode while the shutter is half pressed.

 
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Paul Furman
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      06-13-2008
Bill H wrote:
> tony cooper wrote:
>> Does anyone use a light meter with their DSLR?
>>
>> I can't find my old Gossen from my 35mm days, so I generally switch to
>> Automatic on my Nikon D40, look at the setting, and then go Manual and
>> set a combination from that reading.
>>
>> What are others doing?

>
> On my Nikon D40 I generally (with outdoors lighting, manual) use the bar
> graph in the view finder to set my initial shot.


That's how I learned on the Canon AE1. Back then it seemed amazingly
super automated and really it is quite easy on a DSLR. Matrix metering
is too clever if you are in the frame of mind to go more bare bones than
this, it's always making some assumptions and those are often good but
when they aren't it's frustrating. Center weighted & spot are consistent.

--
Paul Furman
www.edgehill.net
www.baynatives.com

all google groups messages filtered due to spam
 
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Chris Malcolm
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      06-13-2008
In rec.photo.digital tony cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Does anyone use a light meter with their DSLR?


> I can't find my old Gossen from my 35mm days, so I generally switch to
> Automatic on my Nikon D40, look at the setting, and then go Manual and
> set a combination from that reading.


> What are others doing?


I mostly use P mode since what it does is start with the camera's
preferred auto settings and adjusts those by whatever adjustments my
last use of the P-mode imposed. Within easy reach of my thumb in
P-mode are two adjusting wheels. One allows me to change exposure
value with the camera choosing how aperture and shutter are
adjusted. The other allows me to run through the full range of
standard shutter speeds and apertures which give that EV. I say
"standard" because it excludes certain extreme adjustments, e.g, those
which need a tripod and call into play special noise reduction
measures. For those I have to go to manual mode.

So unless I'm doing something unusually extreme, P-mode gives me all
the control of manual mode with auto adapting to changing light
conditions. I find that usually gets me the settings I want much
faster than manual mode would.

But not all cameras have two such conveniently adjustable wheels in
P-mode.

--
Chris Malcolm http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) DoD #205
IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
[http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]

 
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dj_nme
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      06-13-2008
Paul Furman wrote:
> Bill H wrote:
>> tony cooper wrote:
>>> Does anyone use a light meter with their DSLR?
>>>
>>> I can't find my old Gossen from my 35mm days, so I generally switch to
>>> Automatic on my Nikon D40, look at the setting, and then go Manual and
>>> set a combination from that reading.
>>>
>>> What are others doing?

>>
>> On my Nikon D40 I generally (with outdoors lighting, manual) use the
>> bar graph in the view finder to set my initial shot.

>
> That's how I learned on the Canon AE1. Back then it seemed amazingly
> super automated and really it is quite easy on a DSLR. Matrix metering
> is too clever if you are in the frame of mind to go more bare bones than
> this, it's always making some assumptions and those are often good but
> when they aren't it's frustrating. Centre weighted & spot are consistent.
>


Have you got a Katzeye screen or similar?
I've found on a Pentax *ist-Ds that it over-exposes by 0.7 stops with
centre spot metering and is accurate with centre weighted.
My K10D seems to be able to spot meter properly even with a Katzeye
installed and I don't know why.
 
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tony cooper
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      06-13-2008
On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 07:35:11 -0500, "Wilson" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>
>"tony cooper" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news(E-Mail Removed).. .
>> Does anyone use a light meter with their DSLR?
>>
>> I can't find my old Gossen from my 35mm days, so I generally switch to
>> Automatic on my Nikon D40, look at the setting, and then go Manual and
>> set a combination from that reading.
>>
>> What are others doing?
>>
>>
>>
>> --

>I bought a D40 body to use with an inherited collection of fast prime Nikon
>lens from the late sixties and seventies. They fit the D40 just fine, but
>the camera's exposure meter won't work with these lens. I thought I would
>use a hand held meter to get the initial exposure but that turned out the be
>more trouble than it was worth for me.
>
>I start by setting either the aperture or shutter speed I need and guess at
>its reciprocal. Then I check the histogram and highlight blinkie on the
>monitor and fine tune the exposure accordingly. It usually doesn't take
>more than a test shot or two to get it right. If I'm making several
>exposures in the same light I use the last setting and adjust from it if
>needed. I shoot in Raw so I get a bit of extra latitude there. The process
>is surprisingly easy, it's as quick as shooting in manual, I feel engaged
>in the process, and I very much like the results I get with those fast,
>sharp, old SLR lens.
>
>It is kind of funny though. I occasionally shoot black & white with an SLR
>and after after making an exposure I frequently catch myself looking at the
>back of the camera for a histogram that isn't there.


I don't find much need for a hand-held light meter on routine outdoor
shots, but I do quite a bit of table-top photography under external
lighting. Because I do several shots of several objects, I want
consistent results. So, I set my white balance with a gray card and
use the Manual settings.

I am thinking of buying a used Gossen Digital Pro F on eBay to measure
incident light for this purpose. Usually I'll take a test series with
various combinations of speed/f-stop/iso and see which works best for
the subject. I thought perhaps a light meter would help guide me.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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tony cooper
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      06-13-2008
On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 09:24:26 -0500, "Wilson" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>
>"tony cooper" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:(E-Mail Removed).. .
>> On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 07:35:11 -0500, "Wilson" <(E-Mail Removed)>
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>"tony cooper" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>news(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>>> Does anyone use a light meter with their DSLR?
>>>>
>>>> I can't find my old Gossen from my 35mm days, so I generally switch to
>>>> Automatic on my Nikon D40, look at the setting, and then go Manual and
>>>> set a combination from that reading.
>>>>
>>>> What are others doing?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --

>.
>>
>> I don't find much need for a hand-held light meter on routine outdoor
>> shots, but I do quite a bit of table-top photography under external
>> lighting. Because I do several shots of several objects, I want
>> consistent results. So, I set my white balance with a gray card and
>> use the Manual settings.
>>
>> I am thinking of buying a used Gossen Digital Pro F on eBay to measure
>> incident light for this purpose. Usually I'll take a test series with
>> various combinations of speed/f-stop/iso and see which works best for
>> the subject. I thought perhaps a light meter would help guide me.
>>
>>
>> --

>
>I shoot outdoors in natural light so I don't have experience with what you
>are doing. I'm wondering if you are shooting in RAW and using something
>like Adobe Camera Raw for post processing.


No, I don't. I hesitate to mention that here because not shooting RAW
seems to be as laughable in photography groups as wearing a detachable
celluloid collar. I use a Nikon D40 and Adobe Photoshop 7.0, and that
is not compatible with RAW or NEF. I'm too cheap to upgrade or to buy
the Nikon's RAW converter. Actually, I'm quite comfortable with PS7
and see no need to upgrade.




--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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tony cooper
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      06-13-2008
On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 13:11:38 -0500, "Wilson" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>
>By the way, if you are a PC user and you get a new computer with Vista you
>won't be able to install the PS7. I found that out when I tried to install
>CS on a Vista OS.


I'm quite aware of that. When I do need a new computer, I'll buy a
Dell for this reason. Dell still offers Windows XP at no upcharge,
although they do run "specials" on boxes with only Vista.

I also have Adobe Elements 5.0, but I seldom use it. I bought it
because my daughter started out with it, and I wanted it so I could
teach her certain techniques. However, I'm so comfortable with PS7
that I seldom open E5.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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Burgerman
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      06-13-2008
"tony cooper" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 13:11:38 -0500, "Wilson" <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>>
>>By the way, if you are a PC user and you get a new computer with Vista you
>>won't be able to install the PS7. I found that out when I tried to
>>install
>>CS on a Vista OS.

>
> I'm quite aware of that. When I do need a new computer, I'll buy a
> Dell for this reason. Dell still offers Windows XP at no upcharge,
> although they do run "specials" on boxes with only Vista.
>
> I also have Adobe Elements 5.0, but I seldom use it. I bought it
> because my daughter started out with it, and I wanted it so I could
> teach her certain techniques. However, I'm so comfortable with PS7
> that I seldom open E5.
>
>
> --
> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida



Working OK here Vista 64. At least CS3 is.

 
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Peter
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      06-13-2008
"Wilson" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "tony cooper" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Does anyone use a light meter with their DSLR?
>>
>> I can't find my old Gossen from my 35mm days, so I generally switch to
>> Automatic on my Nikon D40, look at the setting, and then go Manual and
>> set a combination from that reading.
>>
>> What are others doing?
>>
>>
>>
>> --

> I bought a D40 body to use with an inherited collection of fast prime
> Nikon lens from the late sixties and seventies. They fit the D40 just
> fine, but the camera's exposure meter won't work with these lens. I
> thought I would use a hand held meter to get the initial exposure but that
> turned out the be more trouble than it was worth for me.
>
> I start by setting either the aperture or shutter speed I need and guess
> at its reciprocal. Then I check the histogram and highlight blinkie on
> the monitor and fine tune the exposure accordingly. It usually doesn't
> take more than a test shot or two to get it right. If I'm making several
> exposures in the same light I use the last setting and adjust from it if
> needed. I shoot in Raw so I get a bit of extra latitude there. The
> process is surprisingly easy, it's as quick as shooting in manual, I feel
> engaged in the process, and I very much like the results I get with those
> fast, sharp, old SLR lens.
>


The exposure on D200 works great with my very old lenses. 200 macro, 75-150
E and 50mm f1.4.

I tried the 200 macro on a friend's D100 and that worked fine, too.
You might want to consider a used D100 or D200.

> It is kind of funny though. I occasionally shoot black & white with an
> SLR and after after making an exposure I frequently catch myself looking
> at the back of the camera for a histogram that isn't there.


LOL, I've done the very same thing and felt awfully dumb.


--
Peter

 
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