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Getting MSCE

 
 
aantozz
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      06-06-2008
Hi all. I'm sort of new to this and am considering going for the MCSE.
The web site has a whole lot of usefull info but I just want to know;
bieng new to this, what exactly do I need to get started. I prefer to self
study and then sit for the exam. Also is it better to start with MCSE or MSCA.

 
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John R
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      06-06-2008

"aantozz" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi all. I'm sort of new to this and am considering going for the MCSE.
> The web site has a whole lot of usefull info but I just want to know;
> bieng new to this, what exactly do I need to get started. I prefer to self
> study and then sit for the exam. Also is it better to start with MCSE or
> MSCA.
>


Follow these links...
http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mc...3/default.mspx
http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mc...3/default.mspx

You will see that there are basically seven requirements (tests) to earn
MCSE. There are 4 core exams on Server 2003, a client exam, a design exam,
and an elective.

For MCSA there are four requirements, the first two core exams, the client
exam, and most of the electives are all the same, so on the way to MCSE, you
can/will earn MCSA. I think that most people work towards MCSA on their way
to MCSE although nothing says you have to do that.

MCSA and MCSE are two different (but closely related) jobs. MCSA or System
Administrator is just that, manage and maintain system administration. MCSE
or System Engineer is more for people who design and implement networks.

Note that MCSA/MCSE stops at Windows Server 2003. For Windows Server 2008,
there are different (but comparable) certifications called MCITP - System
Administrator and MCITP - Enterprise Administrator.

You can complete these tests in any order, and you can train for them (if
you like) any way that you like. The best training for any of these exams
is going to be experience. You can supplement that with books from MS
Press, or any other number of publishers. Some vendors (like TestOut) make
videos. There are even places you can get classroom training if you like.
It's up to you.

For more information on finding training resources, see
www.microsoft.com/learning. Contact prometric (www.prometric.com) for
information on scheduling a test in your area.

John R

 
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Kline Sphere
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-06-2008
>> Hi all. I'm sort of new to this and am considering going for the MCSE.
>> The web site has a whole lot of usefull info but I just want to know;
>> bieng new to this, what exactly do I need to get started. I prefer to self
>> study and then sit for the exam. Also is it better to start with MCSE or
>> MSCA.
>>

>
>Follow yellow brick road


ifypfy

Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
 
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aantozz
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-06-2008
Thank you guys. Now that you mentioned 2008 server John, Can I go straight
for the 2008 server without doing the 2003?

"John R" wrote:

>
> "aantozz" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Hi all. I'm sort of new to this and am considering going for the MCSE.
> > The web site has a whole lot of usefull info but I just want to know;
> > bieng new to this, what exactly do I need to get started. I prefer to self
> > study and then sit for the exam. Also is it better to start with MCSE or
> > MSCA.
> >

>
> Follow these links...
> http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mc...3/default.mspx
> http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mc...3/default.mspx
>
> You will see that there are basically seven requirements (tests) to earn
> MCSE. There are 4 core exams on Server 2003, a client exam, a design exam,
> and an elective.
>
> For MCSA there are four requirements, the first two core exams, the client
> exam, and most of the electives are all the same, so on the way to MCSE, you
> can/will earn MCSA. I think that most people work towards MCSA on their way
> to MCSE although nothing says you have to do that.
>
> MCSA and MCSE are two different (but closely related) jobs. MCSA or System
> Administrator is just that, manage and maintain system administration. MCSE
> or System Engineer is more for people who design and implement networks.
>
> Note that MCSA/MCSE stops at Windows Server 2003. For Windows Server 2008,
> there are different (but comparable) certifications called MCITP - System
> Administrator and MCITP - Enterprise Administrator.
>
> You can complete these tests in any order, and you can train for them (if
> you like) any way that you like. The best training for any of these exams
> is going to be experience. You can supplement that with books from MS
> Press, or any other number of publishers. Some vendors (like TestOut) make
> videos. There are even places you can get classroom training if you like.
> It's up to you.
>
> For more information on finding training resources, see
> www.microsoft.com/learning. Contact prometric (www.prometric.com) for
> information on scheduling a test in your area.
>
> John R
>
>

 
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Yann
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-06-2008
Sure you can. It's even better if you haven't started yet becoming a MCP, so
you will have a fresh view of the new technology and a big plus on your
resume.

"aantozz" wrote:

> Thank you guys. Now that you mentioned 2008 server John, Can I go straight
> for the 2008 server without doing the 2003?
>
> "John R" wrote:
>
> >
> > "aantozz" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > Hi all. I'm sort of new to this and am considering going for the MCSE.
> > > The web site has a whole lot of usefull info but I just want to know;
> > > bieng new to this, what exactly do I need to get started. I prefer to self
> > > study and then sit for the exam. Also is it better to start with MCSE or
> > > MSCA.
> > >

> >
> > Follow these links...
> > http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mc...3/default.mspx
> > http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mc...3/default.mspx
> >
> > You will see that there are basically seven requirements (tests) to earn
> > MCSE. There are 4 core exams on Server 2003, a client exam, a design exam,
> > and an elective.
> >
> > For MCSA there are four requirements, the first two core exams, the client
> > exam, and most of the electives are all the same, so on the way to MCSE, you
> > can/will earn MCSA. I think that most people work towards MCSA on their way
> > to MCSE although nothing says you have to do that.
> >
> > MCSA and MCSE are two different (but closely related) jobs. MCSA or System
> > Administrator is just that, manage and maintain system administration. MCSE
> > or System Engineer is more for people who design and implement networks.
> >
> > Note that MCSA/MCSE stops at Windows Server 2003. For Windows Server 2008,
> > there are different (but comparable) certifications called MCITP - System
> > Administrator and MCITP - Enterprise Administrator.
> >
> > You can complete these tests in any order, and you can train for them (if
> > you like) any way that you like. The best training for any of these exams
> > is going to be experience. You can supplement that with books from MS
> > Press, or any other number of publishers. Some vendors (like TestOut) make
> > videos. There are even places you can get classroom training if you like.
> > It's up to you.
> >
> > For more information on finding training resources, see
> > www.microsoft.com/learning. Contact prometric (www.prometric.com) for
> > information on scheduling a test in your area.
> >
> > John R
> >
> >

 
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Lawrence Garvin
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-06-2008
>
> "aantozz" wrote:
>
>> Thank you guys. Now that you mentioned 2008 server John, Can I go
>> straight
>> for the 2008 server without doing the 2003?


"Yann" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed)...
> Sure you can. It's even better if you haven't started yet becoming a MCP,
> so
> you will have a fresh view of the new technology and a big plus on your
> resume.


Keep in mind, however, there is a lot of *NEW* stuff in Windows Server 2008.

If you're relying upon your expertise with Windows Server 2003 (which you
should), then you'll have to put a bit of extra effort into addressing those
capabilities, features, and tools that are new to Windows Server 2008.

Of particular note in the MCITP track is the new exam on Application
Infrastructure, which has never before existed in any Microsoft
certification track. Prevoiusly the MCSE focused on AD, Network
Infrastructure, and general Server Administration -- now you also need to be
competent in Applications Infrastructure (IIS, Terminal Services,
Virtualization).

--
Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP(x2), MCTS(x5), MCP(x7), MCBMSP
Senior Data Architect, APQC, Houston, Texas
Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-200

MS WSUS Website: http://www.microsoft.com/wsus
My Websites: http://www.onsitechsolutions.com;
http://wsusinfo.onsitechsolutions.com
My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/pro...awrence.Garvin

 
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Kline Sphere
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-09-2008
> a big plus on your
>resume.


just like aids would

Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
 
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kpg
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-09-2008
=?Utf-8?B?WWFubg==?= <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
news(E-Mail Removed):

> Sure you can. It's even better if you haven't started yet becoming a
> MCP, so you will have a fresh view of the new technology and a big
> plus on your resume.


Happy belated PotD

 
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OTHMAN
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-09-2008
"Yann" wrote:

> Sure you can. It's even better if you haven't started yet becoming a MCP, so
> you will have a fresh view of the new technology and a big plus on your
> resume.
>
> "aantozz" wrote:
>
> > Thank you guys. Now that you mentioned 2008 server John, Can I go straight
> > for the 2008 server without doing the 2003?
> >
> > "John R" wrote:
> >
> > >
> > > "aantozz" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > > Hi all. I'm sort of new to this and am considering going for the MCSE.
> > > > The web site has a whole lot of usefull info but I just want to know;
> > > > bieng new to this, what exactly do I need to get started. I prefer to self
> > > > study and then sit for the exam. Also is it better to start with MCSE or
> > > > MSCA.
> > > >
> > >
> > > Follow these links...
> > > http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mc...3/default.mspx
> > > http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mc...3/default.mspx
> > >
> > > You will see that there are basically seven requirements (tests) to earn
> > > MCSE. There are 4 core exams on Server 2003, a client exam, a design exam,
> > > and an elective.
> > >
> > > For MCSA there are four requirements, the first two core exams, the client
> > > exam, and most of the electives are all the same, so on the way to MCSE, you
> > > can/will earn MCSA. I think that most people work towards MCSA on their way
> > > to MCSE although nothing says you have to do that.
> > >
> > > MCSA and MCSE are two different (but closely related) jobs. MCSA or System
> > > Administrator is just that, manage and maintain system administration. MCSE
> > > or System Engineer is more for people who design and implement networks.
> > >
> > > Note that MCSA/MCSE stops at Windows Server 2003. For Windows Server 2008,
> > > there are different (but comparable) certifications called MCITP - System
> > > Administrator and MCITP - Enterprise Administrator.
> > >
> > > You can complete these tests in any order, and you can train for them (if
> > > you like) any way that you like. The best training for any of these exams
> > > is going to be experience. You can supplement that with books from MS
> > > Press, or any other number of publishers. Some vendors (like TestOut) make
> > > videos. There are even places you can get classroom training if you like.
> > > It's up to you.
> > >
> > > For more information on finding training resources, see
> > > www.microsoft.com/learning. Contact prometric (www.prometric.com) for
> > > information on scheduling a test in your area.
> > >
> > > John R
> > >


not bad
 
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Kline Sphere
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-09-2008
>> Sure you can. It's even better if you haven't started yet becoming a
>> MCP, so you will have a fresh view of the new technology and a big
>> plus on your resume.

>
>Happy belated PotD


sure made me laugh!

Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
 
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