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What after C++

 
 
Nezhate
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      05-28-2008
Hi There !
After learning C++, I must learn gtk mm, libxml, eclipse, TCP/IP .
From what should I start?
Thanks !!
 
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Ian Collins
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      05-28-2008
Nezhate wrote:
> Hi There !
> After learning C++, I must learn gtk mm, libxml, eclipse, TCP/IP .
> From what should I start?


Your local public library or online book store?

--
Ian Collins.
 
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Georgi Kehaiov
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      05-28-2008
Nezhate wrote:
> Hi There !
> After learning C++, I must learn gtk mm, libxml, eclipse, TCP/IP .
> From what should I start?
> Thanks !!


I'd recommend you to read something more detailed about the standard
library. Then something OS specific - Linux / Windows / Solaris / BSD /
whatever. Now you should be ready to say what is it you want most ?
graphics / networking / administration / desktop apps / etc ...

best regards,

Georgi
 
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Nezhate
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      05-28-2008
On May 28, 2:49 pm, Georgi Kehaiov <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Nezhate wrote:
> > Hi There !
> > After learning C++, I must learn gtk mm, libxml, eclipse, TCP/IP .
> > From what should I start?
> > Thanks !!

>
> I'd recommend you to read something more detailed about the standard
> library. Then something OS specific - Linux / Windows / Solaris / BSD /
> whatever. Now you should be ready to say what is it you want most ?
> graphics / networking / administration / desktop apps / etc ...
>
> best regards,
>
> Georgi


I'm working under Linux.
Which kind of standard library you meant ?
In the first position I think that I want to learn graphics
 
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Georgi Kehaiov
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      05-28-2008
My bad, I'm sorry. I meant the Standard Template Library, often
abbreviated as STL.

Since you are interested in graphics with linux I'd recommend you to
look for some materials on Mesa or OpenGL or the like.

regards,

Georgi

Nezhate wrote:
> On May 28, 2:49 pm, Georgi Kehaiov <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> Nezhate wrote:
>>> Hi There !
>>> After learning C++, I must learn gtk mm, libxml, eclipse, TCP/IP .
>>> From what should I start?
>>> Thanks !!

>> I'd recommend you to read something more detailed about the standard
>> library. Then something OS specific - Linux / Windows / Solaris / BSD /
>> whatever. Now you should be ready to say what is it you want most ?
>> graphics / networking / administration / desktop apps / etc ...
>>
>> best regards,
>>
>> Georgi

>
> I'm working under Linux.
> Which kind of standard library you meant ?
> In the first position I think that I want to learn graphics



--

-- http://weblog.ubernice.org
 
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James Kanze
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      05-29-2008
On May 28, 12:50 pm, (E-Mail Removed) (Yannick Tremblay) wrote:
> In article
> <(E-Mail Removed)>,


> Nezhate <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:


> >After learning C++, I must learn gtk mm, libxml, eclipse, TCP/IP .


> Well, none of these are programming languages.


Yes, but like a language, they are (almost) all tools. I'd say
that there are some more basic things which are important as
well: software design, algorithms, software engineering, etc..
Maybe threading or parsing. Or data base technology (SQL,
anyone? But we're back more or less to the language level).

Generally speaking, some knowledge of application considerations
will be necessary as well. (TCP/IP may be part of this---if
you're doing any networking, you should have at least a basic
understanding of how the network works.)

With regards to tools, there are two very essential ones that I
don't see mentionned there: a good editor and some sort of
scripting language.

--
James Kanze (GABI Software) email:(E-Mail Removed)
Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
 
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coal@mailvault.com
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      05-30-2008
On May 29, 1:33*am, James Kanze <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On May 28, 12:50 pm, (E-Mail Removed) (Yannick Tremblay) wrote:
>
> > In article
> > <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> > Nezhate *<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > >After learning C++, I must learn gtk mm, libxml, eclipse, TCP/IP .

> > Well, none of these are programming languages.

>
> Yes, but like a language, they are (almost) all tools. *I'd say
> that there are some more basic things which are important as
> well: software design, algorithms, software engineering, etc..
> Maybe threading or parsing. *Or data base technology (SQL,
> anyone? *But we're back more or less to the language level).
>
> Generally speaking, some knowledge of application considerations
> will be necessary as well. *(TCP/IP may be part of this---if
> you're doing any networking, you should have at least a basic
> understanding of how the network works.)
>
> With regards to tools, there are two very essential ones that I
> don't see mentionned there: a good editor and some sort of
> scripting language.
>


Anymore, if a script is pushing 8 to 10 lines, it gets turned into a C+
+
program. A few years ago B. Stroustrup said something like - lots of
PERL
usually equals unmaintainable. That jives with my experience and if
a
script shows signs of growing, I nip it in the bud before it turns
into
a mess. IMO an editor is more important than a scripting language.

Brian Wood
Ebenezer Enterprises
www.webEbenezer.net
 
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James Kanze
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      05-31-2008
On May 30, 9:09 pm, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> On May 29, 1:33 am, James Kanze <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > On May 28, 12:50 pm, (E-Mail Removed) (Yannick Tremblay) wrote:


> > > In article
> > > <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> > > Nezhate <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > > >After learning C++, I must learn gtk mm, libxml, eclipse, TCP/IP .
> > > Well, none of these are programming languages.


> > Yes, but like a language, they are (almost) all tools. I'd say
> > that there are some more basic things which are important as
> > well: software design, algorithms, software engineering, etc..
> > Maybe threading or parsing. Or data base technology (SQL,
> > anyone? But we're back more or less to the language level).


> > Generally speaking, some knowledge of application considerations
> > will be necessary as well. (TCP/IP may be part of this---if
> > you're doing any networking, you should have at least a basic
> > understanding of how the network works.)


> > With regards to tools, there are two very essential ones that I
> > don't see mentionned there: a good editor and some sort of
> > scripting language.


> Anymore, if a script is pushing 8 to 10 lines, it gets turned
> into a C++ program.


Not necessarily.

> A few years ago B. Stroustrup said something like - lots of
> PERL usually equals unmaintainable.


I can agree with that, but Perl isn't the only scripting
language available. I make extensive use of AWK, but also, a
lot of what I use scripts for involves things that are fairly
complex to do in C++: I don't have a library function which will
do an rsh, for example. (A lot of my work currently involved
validating our migration to Linux. Running the old code on
Sparc under Solaris, the new on a PC under Linux, and comparing
the results. And I use Bourne shell and the usual Unix tools
for that---no need for any special C++ code.)

> That jives with my experience and if a script shows signs of
> growing, I nip it in the bud before it turns into a mess. IMO
> an editor is more important than a scripting language.


Given that you need the editor to write the scripts.

--
James Kanze (GABI Software) email:(E-Mail Removed)
Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
 
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coal@mailvault.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-31-2008
On May 31, 2:56*am, James Kanze <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On May 30, 9:09 pm, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>
>
>
> > On May 29, 1:33 am, James Kanze <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > > Yes, but like a language, they are (almost) all tools. *I'd say
> > > that there are some more basic things which are important as
> > > well: software design, algorithms, software engineering, etc..
> > > Maybe threading or parsing. *Or data base technology (SQL,
> > > anyone? *But we're back more or less to the language level).
> > > Generally speaking, some knowledge of application considerations
> > > will be necessary as well. *(TCP/IP may be part of this---if
> > > you're doing any networking, you should have at least a basic
> > > understanding of how the network works.)
> > > With regards to tools, there are two very essential ones that I
> > > don't see mentionned there: a good editor and some sort of
> > > scripting language.

> > Anymore, if a script is pushing 8 to 10 lines, it gets turned
> > into a C++ program.

>
> Not necessarily.
>
> > A few years ago B. Stroustrup said something like - lots of
> > PERL usually equals unmaintainable.

>
> I can agree with that, but Perl isn't the only scripting
> language available. *I make extensive use of AWK, but also, a
> lot of what I use scripts for involves things that are fairly
> complex to do in C++: I don't have a library function which will
> do an rsh, for example. *


In that case I agree, but I would make a note to check every
six months or so for a new library that supports that.
Eventually it will probably be available and then I would work
towards getting a C++ version going. Better late than never.


> (A lot of my work currently involved
> validating our migration to Linux. *Running the old code on
> Sparc under Solaris, the new on a PC under Linux, and comparing
> the results. *And I use Bourne shell and the usual Unix tools
> for that---no need for any special C++ code.)
>


Did you consider using Open Solaris on PCs? I was advised to
consider that a while ago rather than Linux. I haven't really
looked into it. So far I'm happy with Linux. I note that it
matters what distribution of Linux you use -
"How a programming error introduced profound security
vulnerabilities in millions of computer systems."
http://www.technologyreview.com/Infotech/20801/page1

Brian Wood
Ebenezer Enterprises
www.webEbenezer.net


 
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James Kanze
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-01-2008
On May 31, 11:03 pm, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> On May 31, 2:56 am, James Kanze <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:


[...]
> > (A lot of my work currently involved validating our
> > migration to Linux. Running the old code on Sparc under
> > Solaris, the new on a PC under Linux, and comparing the
> > results. And I use Bourne shell and the usual Unix tools
> > for that---no need for any special C++ code.)


> Did you consider using Open Solaris on PCs?


I didn't have anything to do with the decision, but given the
body of existing, Solaris oriented code, it certainly should
have been a consideration (but probably wasn't). As it happens,
my part of the application is very I/O bound (it's responsible
for the transactional integrity of the entire system), which
means that switching to PC's is going to pose significant
performance problems for me---the CPU's may be as fast or faster
than the Sparcs we currently use, but the I/O bandwidth is
noticeably less.

> I was advised to consider that a while ago rather than Linux.
> I haven't really looked into it. So far I'm happy with Linux.


It probably depends on what you're doing. My experience is that
Linux is a good deal less reliable than Solaris (but that's
comparing Linux on PC's with Solaris on Sparcs), or even than
Windows. But it's probably reliable enough for a lot of things,
and the price is certainly acceptable. (I might also add that
most of the reliability problems I've actually encountered on
Linux seem to be linked with the X system. Which of course,
isn't a real problem for my server software.)

> I note that it matters what distribution of Linux you use -
> "How a programming error introduced profound security
> vulnerabilities in millions of computer
> systems."http://www.technologyreview.com/Infotech/20801/page1


That sounds like a more general problem. If I understand the
article correctly, the software was originally counting on the
memory in some buffer not being initialized for some sort of
randomness. Which is a serious error to begin with. But of
course, if the desire is some sort of randomness, replacing the
initial lack of initialization with initialization with all
zeros is only going to make things worse. (The correct
solution, of course, would be to initialize with values read
from /dev/random.)

--
James Kanze (GABI Software) email:(E-Mail Removed)
Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
 
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