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Command-line power

 
 
Craig Shore
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      05-12-2008
On Sun, 11 May 2008 22:45:14 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
<(E-Mail Removed)_zealand> wrote:

>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Craig Shore did
>write:
>
>> On Sun, 11 May 2008 19:34:43 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
>> <(E-Mail Removed)_zealand> wrote:
>>
>>>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Craig Shore did
>>>write:
>>>
>>>> Or alternatively he could drag and drop the individual video files
>>>> onto a timeline in a video editing program (people like to see it
>>>> doing what they think it's doing) and hit the export button to save it
>>>> to one file.
>>>
>>>Yeah, only about 15 of them to do at a time, not considering the quality
>>>loss due to recompression...

>>
>> Drag the whole lot in one go then.

>
>What about getting them in the right order?


If they're in the order of the file names, no problem.

 
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Lawrence D'Oliveiro
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-12-2008
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Brian Mathews did
write:

> On Sun, 11 May 2008 22:45:14 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
> <(E-Mail Removed)_zealand> wrote:
>
>>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Craig Shore did
>>write:
>>
>>> On Sun, 11 May 2008 19:34:43 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
>>> <(E-Mail Removed)_zealand> wrote:
>>>
>>>>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Craig Shore did
>>>>write:
>>>>
>>>>> Or alternatively he could drag and drop the individual video files
>>>>> onto a timeline in a video editing program (people like to see it
>>>>> doing what they think it's doing) and hit the export button to save it
>>>>> to one file.
>>>>
>>>>Yeah, only about 15 of them to do at a time, not considering the quality
>>>>loss due to recompression...
>>>
>>> Drag the whole lot in one go then.

>>
>>What about getting them in the right order?

>
> Dumbo you have complete control of the orders, gee why are you so thick..?


Only 1,307,674,368,000 different ways to arrange them, all of which are
wrong. Except one.

And then there's the compression settings--choose the right one, and it
should copy the source video unchanged--you hope. Otherwise, it's going to
decompress and recompress with consequent loss of quality, and increase in
time.

And you've got to get all this right, not once, but every time, for every
single shoot.

Do you begin to understand why reducing the number of manual steps reduces
the number of opportunities for people to stuff things up?
 
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Lawrence D'Oliveiro
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-12-2008
In article </(E-Mail Removed)>, Don Hills did write:

> In article <g06iqa$qe0$(E-Mail Removed)>,
> Lawrence D'Oliveiro <(E-Mail Removed)_zealand> wrote:
>>
>>Can't you set up udev rules that will block access to USB storage devices
>>while allowing other things?

>
> Probably, but that's not practical. We use USB storage devices a lot, for
> moving test data around.


Make the rules more specific, then--look at manufacturer and model names, or
narrow it down to specific whitelisted serial numbers if necessary.
 
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Lawrence D'Oliveiro
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-13-2008
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Craig Shore did
write:

> On Sun, 11 May 2008 22:45:14 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
> <(E-Mail Removed)_zealand> wrote:
>
>>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Craig Shore did
>>write:
>>
>>> On Sun, 11 May 2008 19:34:43 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
>>> <(E-Mail Removed)_zealand> wrote:
>>>
>>>>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Craig Shore did
>>>>write:
>>>>
>>>>> Or alternatively he could drag and drop the individual video files
>>>>> onto a timeline in a video editing program (people like to see it
>>>>> doing what they think it's doing) and hit the export button to save it
>>>>> to one file.
>>>>
>>>>Yeah, only about 15 of them to do at a time, not considering the quality
>>>>loss due to recompression...
>>>
>>> Drag the whole lot in one go then.

>>
>>What about getting them in the right order?

>
> If they're in the order of the file names, no problem.


Did I mention there are additional ".moi" and ".pgi" files in those
directories, containing proprietary junk, that need to be skipped?

So we have to pick out the right files, skip the unwanted ones, open a new
dummy project in a video editor, import the files one by one into the
timeline in the right order, choose the right settings to avoid
recompression, and export the whole lot out again? And get this exactly
right not once, but for every shoot?

Do you begin to appreciate how reducing the number of manual steps reduces
the number of opportunities for people to stuff things up?
 
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Lawrence D'Oliveiro
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-13-2008
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Don Hills did write:

> In article <g08oi9$3ca$(E-Mail Removed)>,
> Lawrence D'Oliveiro <(E-Mail Removed)_zealand> wrote:
>>
>>Make the rules more specific, then--look at manufacturer and model names,
>>or narrow it down to specific whitelisted serial numbers if necessary.

>
> It might work where you work. It wouldn't work where I work. It would be a
> case of running around in ever decreasing circles, with the inevitable
> result. Which is a feeling I often get when I get into a discussion with
> you... I should have learned better by now.


Here I am trying hard to help you by offering a whole number of different
constructive suggestions, and all you can do is denigrate me. Can you give
me a reason why I shouldn't simply ignore you in future?
 
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Hamish Campbell
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-13-2008
On May 13, 12:05*pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Don Hills did write:
>
> > In article <g08oi9$(E-Mail Removed)>,
> > Lawrence D'Oliveiro <(E-Mail Removed)_zealand> wrote:

>
> >>Make the rules more specific, then--look at manufacturer and model names,
> >>or narrow it down to specific whitelisted serial numbers if necessary.

>
> > It might work where you work. It wouldn't work where I work. It would be a
> > case of running around in ever decreasing circles, with the inevitable
> > result. Which is a feeling I often get when I get into a discussion with
> > you... I should have learned better by now.

>
> Here I am trying hard to help you by offering a whole number of different
> constructive suggestions, and all you can do is denigrate me. Can you give
> me a reason why I shouldn't simply ignore you in future?


... it's not really a useful suggestion - you don't want to be
maintaining lists of allowed USB devices (or, at least, it's the last
thing _i'd_ want to do).

We use a Mailmarshall Endpoint Security:

http://www.marshal.com/products/endp...rity/index.asp

Gives you lots of options around who can do what, and you see
everything that is transferred to and from devices and by who. You can
block specific media too. We don't block USB sticks, but we use it as
a security audit tool and to make sure certain things don't get on or
off our network. Highly recommend.

Hope this helps,
Hamish

 
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Nik Coughlin
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-13-2008
"Collector€NZ" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:4826b172$(E-Mail Removed)...
> EMB wrote:
>> Don Hills wrote:
>>>
>>> It's a tool for those restricted by corporate edict(*)

>>
>> Do you work for IBM Don?

> Corp edict has its place.
>
> At work I have a bunch of users (Shift workers) who bring in VLC Portable
> media player on USB drives along with divx movies so they can watch them
> on night shift, trouble is that the VLC portable creates large temp files
> on the c:\windows\temp and doesnt remove them. Nett result after a while
> the Hard disk fulls up and people cant log on anymore since there is no
> space left to download there profile.
>
> They can get away with this as the VLC player doesnt require install
> (Install needs local admin and that is locked down) so really the only way
> to control it is Corp edict and threats


Strange. Sure it's the VLC player doing it? From the site: "when you
unplug the device, none of your personal data is left behind". Also, just
tested with a number of different video formats and a DVD movie ISO and
there are no files being written to my sandbox folder (I'm running it in
Sandboxie so I can see what files get written - none).

 
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Lawrence D'Oliveiro
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-13-2008
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Brian Mathews did
write:

> On Mon, 12 May 2008 18:33:45 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
> <(E-Mail Removed)_zealand> wrote:
>
>>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Brian Mathews did
>>write:
>>
>>> On Sun, 11 May 2008 22:45:14 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
>>> <(E-Mail Removed)_zealand> wrote:
>>>
>>>>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Craig Shore did
>>>>write:
>>>>
>>>>> On Sun, 11 May 2008 19:34:43 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
>>>>> <(E-Mail Removed)_zealand> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Craig Shore
>>>>>>did write:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Or alternatively he could drag and drop the individual video files
>>>>>>> onto a timeline in a video editing program (people like to see it
>>>>>>> doing what they think it's doing) and hit the export button to save
>>>>>>> it to one file.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Yeah, only about 15 of them to do at a time, not considering the
>>>>>>quality loss due to recompression...
>>>>>
>>>>> Drag the whole lot in one go then.
>>>>
>>>>What about getting them in the right order?
>>>
>>> Dumbo you have complete control of the orders, gee why are you so
>>> thick..?

>>
>>Only 1,307,674,368,000 different ways to arrange them, all of which are
>>wrong. Except one.
>>
>>And then there's the compression settings--choose the right one, and it
>>should copy the source video unchanged--you hope. Otherwise, it's going to
>>decompress and recompress with consequent loss of quality, and increase in
>>time.
>>
>>And you've got to get all this right, not once, but every time, for every
>>single shoot.
>>
>>Do you begin to understand why reducing the number of manual steps reduces
>>the number of opportunities for people to stuff things up?

>
> Admit it you just don't have a clue, so why Rant the a CLI is Better..


Do you understand the concept that ordinary humans are quite bad at doing
tedious, repetitive tasks correctly and reliably? Do you have an issue with
that, or do you just don't understand what I'm saying? Should I try simpler
words? Draw you little pictures?
 
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Lawrence D'Oliveiro
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-13-2008
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, thingy did write:

> CLI has really great advantages, however so does gui....ie cli is great
> for drill down vary specific and precise the actions, the more specific
> the more cli tends to be the tool of choice.....when you want overall
> views then a gui can be a far better interface.


Or you can combine both--provide a simple GUI to pick things, to which you
can then apply powerful arbitrary CLI sequences. For example, my
SortPictures script
<http://www.codecodex.com/wiki/index.php?title=Quick_Image_Sorting>, which
lets you quickly browse through a set of images, and perform any of a
number of different commands that you define on each one with a single
keystroke. I have used it to sort through hundreds of images in just a few
minutes.
 
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