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java -version

 
 
Arne Vajhøj
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      05-07-2008
Wayne wrote:
> Lew wrote:
>> Thomas Fritsch wrote:
>>> Arne Vajhøj wrote:
>>>> Francesco wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> How can I find the version of the java that is invoked by an applet
>>>>> from browser?
>>>>> Which is the difference between java -version and the version viewed
>>>>> in the Java console from browser (they are not the same) ?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> http://www.vajhoej.dk/arne/eksperten...owversion.html
>>>> will tell you.
>>>>
>>>> And if you need to put it in your code, then you can see the source at:
>>>> http://www.vajhoej.dk/arne/eksperten...owversion.java !
>>> I get "404 Not found" here.
>>> You meant
>>> <http://www.vajhoej.dk/arne/eksperten/showversion/ShowVersion.java>,
>>> which works fine.

>>
>> Web-page URLs aren't case sensitive. The first version does not
>> result in a 404 from here.

>
> The host name part of a URL isn't case sensitive, but rest is
> including the filename. Some web servers will match in a case-
> insensitive way if some option is on. (mod_speling in Apache,
> MS IIS by default.)


It is completely server specific whether it is case sensitive
or not.

Default (no special options) would likely be case sensitive
on case sensitive file systems and not case sensitive on
non case sensitive file systems. You can always count on
developer laziness.

Arne
 
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Owen Jacobson
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      05-07-2008
On May 7, 6:57*pm, Arne Vajhj <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Wayne wrote:
> > Lew wrote:
> >> Thomas Fritsch wrote:
> >>> Arne Vajhj wrote:
> >>>> Francesco wrote:

>
> >>>>> How can I find the version of the java that is invoked by an applet
> >>>>> from browser?
> >>>>> Which is the difference between java -version and the version viewed
> >>>>> in the Java console from browser (they are not the same) ?

>
> >>>>http://www.vajhoej.dk/arne/eksperten...owversion.html
> >>>> will tell you.

>
> >>>> And if you need to put it in your code, then you can see the source at:
> >>>>http://www.vajhoej.dk/arne/eksperten/showversion/showversion.java!
> >>> I get "404 Not found" here.
> >>> You meant
> >>> <http://www.vajhoej.dk/arne/eksperten/showversion/ShowVersion.java>,
> >>> which works fine.

>
> >> Web-page URLs aren't case sensitive. *The first version does not
> >> result in a 404 from here.

>
> > The host name part of a URL isn't case sensitive, but rest is
> > including the filename. *Some web servers will match in a case-
> > insensitive way if some option is on. *(mod_speling in Apache,
> > MS IIS by default.)

>
> It is completely server specific whether it is case sensitive
> or not.
>
> Default (no special options) would likely be case sensitive
> on case sensitive file systems and not case sensitive on
> non case sensitive file systems. You can always count on
> developer laziness.
>
> Arne


Per the semantics defined in RFC 2616, the path part of an HTTP URL is
intended to be case sensitive regardless of server behaviour:

3.2.3 URI Comparison

When comparing two URIs to decide if they match or not, a client
SHOULD use a case-sensitive octet-by-octet comparison of the entire
URIs, with these exceptions:

- A port that is empty or not given is equivalent to the default
port for that URI-reference;

- Comparisons of host names MUST be case-insensitive;

- Comparisons of scheme names MUST be case-insensitive;

- An empty abs_path is equivalent to an abs_path of "/".

Well, okay, it is a "SHOULD" and not a "MUST". However, many
important pieces of software, including caching proxies and most
search engines, will treat URLs that differ by case as being distinct
resources. Google, for example, will assign pagerank to both
resources separately, and squid will cache both separately.

This shows up in other places URLs are used: XML Namespaces that are
identified by a URL are completely case-sensitive, even within the
host portion, for example. In general, unless you have specific
knowledge of the URL scheme in use, it's best to assume that URLs are
case sensitive even if the software that's interpreting them isn't.

-o
 
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Arne Vajhj
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-08-2008
Owen Jacobson wrote:
> On May 7, 6:57 pm, Arne Vajhj <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> Wayne wrote:
>>> Lew wrote:
>>>> Thomas Fritsch wrote:
>>>>> Arne Vajhj wrote:
>>>>>> Francesco wrote:
>>>>>>> How can I find the version of the java that is invoked by an applet
>>>>>>> from browser?
>>>>>>> Which is the difference between java -version and the version viewed
>>>>>>> in the Java console from browser (they are not the same) ?
>>>>>> http://www.vajhoej.dk/arne/eksperten...owversion.html
>>>>>> will tell you.
>>>>>> And if you need to put it in your code, then you can see the source at:
>>>>>> http://www.vajhoej.dk/arne/eksperten/showversion/showversion.java!
>>>>> I get "404 Not found" here.
>>>>> You meant
>>>>> <http://www.vajhoej.dk/arne/eksperten/showversion/ShowVersion.java>,
>>>>> which works fine.
>>>> Web-page URLs aren't case sensitive. The first version does not
>>>> result in a 404 from here.
>>> The host name part of a URL isn't case sensitive, but rest is
>>> including the filename. Some web servers will match in a case-
>>> insensitive way if some option is on. (mod_speling in Apache,
>>> MS IIS by default.)

>> It is completely server specific whether it is case sensitive
>> or not.
>>
>> Default (no special options) would likely be case sensitive
>> on case sensitive file systems and not case sensitive on
>> non case sensitive file systems. You can always count on
>> developer laziness.
>>
>> Arne

>
> Per the semantics defined in RFC 2616, the path part of an HTTP URL is
> intended to be case sensitive regardless of server behaviour:
>
> 3.2.3 URI Comparison
>
> When comparing two URIs to decide if they match or not, a client
> SHOULD use a case-sensitive octet-by-octet comparison of the entire
> URIs, with these exceptions:


> Well, okay, it is a "SHOULD" and not a "MUST".


Even if it had been "MUST" then it had not mattered.

They keyword is *client*.

If it is allowed for a server to have case sensitive path, then the
client should/must consider it case sensitive.

You can not conclude that it should/must or is intended to be
case sensitive on the server.

> This shows up in other places URLs are used: XML Namespaces that are
> identified by a URL are completely case-sensitive, even within the
> host portion, for example.


Which violates the section you just quoted.

> In general, unless you have specific
> knowledge of the URL scheme in use, it's best to assume that URLs are
> case sensitive even if the software that's interpreting them isn't.


That is good advice. But it is still not case sensitive.

Arne
 
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