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5.25 floppy drive problem

 
 
Fred Kasner
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      03-19-2008
This sounds like an archaic problem but here it goes. I ran across some
old disks (5.25 floppies 1.2 MB) that contain some data and some
programs that I really would like to save. Thus my problems began. I
have two old puters in the closet but can't use the 5.25 inch drives to
read the old disks. The old puters both have failed CMOS batteries
(really cells not batteries) so the B: drives can't be enabled. In both
cases the BIOS allows changing the specifics for the B: drives. But
since there is no CMOS power the default kicks in when the BIOS is
closed and boot-up continues. And the default is for no B: drive
whatsoever. I even tried attaching the 5.25 drive to the A: drive
controller. No joy. I suspect that getting a battery for the CMOS for
these old Win 95 machines would be not only difficult but expensive for
only a few dozen disks to copy to CDs or 3.5 floppies. These Intel boxes
don't have any clearly labeled locations for the batteries in any event.
I suspect the batteries are found in a clock chip but not labeled at
all. If I can get the computer to boot up just once with the B: drive
working I can create a Norton Utilities rescue disk that would solve the
problem in the future (it would allow a boot that enabled the B: drive
for future boots.) Hooking this thing via a network would be an awful
solution since Win 95 was not exactly network friendly at best.

Does anyone know of a solution? Possibly a source for an external 5.25
floppy drive? A hardware tweak to get the built-in floppy drive to work?
TIA.
FK
 
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Evan Platt
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-19-2008
On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 22:06:41 GMT, Fred Kasner <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>This sounds like an archaic problem but here it goes. I ran across some
>old disks (5.25 floppies 1.2 MB) that contain some data and some
>programs that I really would like to save. Thus my problems began. I
>have two old puters in the closet but can't use the 5.25 inch drives to
>read the old disks. The old puters both have failed CMOS batteries
>(really cells not batteries) so the B: drives can't be enabled. In both
>cases the BIOS allows changing the specifics for the B: drives. But
>since there is no CMOS power the default kicks in when the BIOS is
>closed and boot-up continues. And the default is for no B: drive
>whatsoever. I even tried attaching the 5.25 drive to the A: drive
>controller. No joy. I suspect that getting a battery for the CMOS for
>these old Win 95 machines would be not only difficult but expensive for
>only a few dozen disks to copy to CDs or 3.5 floppies. These Intel boxes
>don't have any clearly labeled locations for the batteries in any event.
>I suspect the batteries are found in a clock chip but not labeled at
>all. If I can get the computer to boot up just once with the B: drive
>working I can create a Norton Utilities rescue disk that would solve the
>problem in the future (it would allow a boot that enabled the B: drive
>for future boots.) Hooking this thing via a network would be an awful
>solution since Win 95 was not exactly network friendly at best.
>
>Does anyone know of a solution? Possibly a source for an external 5.25
>floppy drive? A hardware tweak to get the built-in floppy drive to work?


Take the drive out of the old computer. Put it in the new computer.
--
To reply via e-mail, remove The Obvious from my e-mail address.
 
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Pennywise@DerryMaine.Gov
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-19-2008
Fred Kasner <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>This sounds like an archaic problem but here it goes. I ran across some
>old disks (5.25 floppies 1.2 MB) that contain some data and some
>programs that I really would like to save. Thus my problems began. I
>have two old puters in the closet but can't use the 5.25 inch drives to
>read the old disks. The old puters both have failed CMOS batteries
>(really cells not batteries) so the B: drives can't be enabled. In both
>cases the BIOS allows changing the specifics for the B: drives. But
>since there is no CMOS power the default kicks in when the BIOS is
>closed and boot-up continues. And the default is for no B: drive
>whatsoever. I even tried attaching the 5.25 drive to the A: drive
>controller. No joy. I suspect that getting a battery for the CMOS for
>these old Win 95 machines would be not only difficult but expensive for
>only a few dozen disks to copy to CDs or 3.5 floppies. These Intel boxes
>don't have any clearly labeled locations for the batteries in any event.
>I suspect the batteries are found in a clock chip but not labeled at
>all. If I can get the computer to boot up just once with the B: drive
>working I can create a Norton Utilities rescue disk that would solve the
>problem in the future (it would allow a boot that enabled the B: drive
>for future boots.) Hooking this thing via a network would be an awful
>solution since Win 95 was not exactly network friendly at best.
>
>Does anyone know of a solution? Possibly a source for an external 5.25
>floppy drive? A hardware tweak to get the built-in floppy drive to work?


Too much to answer.

Basicly look for a solder on battery, you don't need the battery if
you just keep the power on (sometimes)

A:\ drive can be swapped with B:\ drive in the BIOS, also you select
the drive size in the bios (5.25)

--

Remember that "lamp" optical illusion? It wasn't a lamp
http://calloftheday.net/?p=201
 
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philo
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      03-20-2008

"Evan Platt" <evan@*******************************> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 22:06:41 GMT, Fred Kasner <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
> >This sounds like an archaic problem but here it goes. I ran across some
> >old disks (5.25 floppies 1.2 MB) that contain some data and some
> >programs that I really would like to save. Thus my problems began. I
> >have two old puters in the closet but can't use the 5.25 inch drives to
> >read the old disks. The old puters both have failed CMOS batteries
> >(really cells not batteries) so the B: drives can't be enabled. In both
> >cases the BIOS allows changing the specifics for the B: drives. But
> >since there is no CMOS power the default kicks in when the BIOS is
> >closed and boot-up continues. And the default is for no B: drive
> >whatsoever. I even tried attaching the 5.25 drive to the A: drive
> >controller. No joy. I suspect that getting a battery for the CMOS for
> >these old Win 95 machines would be not only difficult but expensive for
> >only a few dozen disks to copy to CDs or 3.5 floppies. These Intel boxes
> >don't have any clearly labeled locations for the batteries in any event.
> >I suspect the batteries are found in a clock chip but not labeled at
> >all. If I can get the computer to boot up just once with the B: drive
> >working I can create a Norton Utilities rescue disk that would solve the
> >problem in the future (it would allow a boot that enabled the B: drive
> >for future boots.) Hooking this thing via a network would be an awful
> >solution since Win 95 was not exactly network friendly at best.
> >
> >Does anyone know of a solution? Possibly a source for an external 5.25
> >floppy drive? A hardware tweak to get the built-in floppy drive to work?

>
> Take the drive out of the old computer. Put it in the new computer.




That's a very good suggestion.

I just wanted to add that even if the cmos battery is dead.
If the bios settings are changed but the machine is not turned off...they
should hold


 
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Gaius Baltar
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-20-2008
On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 15:20:55 -0700, Evan Platt
<evan@*******************************> wrote:

>Take the drive out of the old computer. Put it in the new computer.


Never had any joy getting 5.25" 1.2 MB FDD (of which I have 2, well
stored etc) to run in my more recent PCs, even under WIN95.

gb
 
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Fred Kasner
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-20-2008
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> Fred Kasner <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> This sounds like an archaic problem but here it goes. I ran across some
>> old disks (5.25 floppies 1.2 MB) that contain some data and some
>> programs that I really would like to save. Thus my problems began. I
>> have two old puters in the closet but can't use the 5.25 inch drives to
>> read the old disks. The old puters both have failed CMOS batteries
>> (really cells not batteries) so the B: drives can't be enabled. In both
>> cases the BIOS allows changing the specifics for the B: drives. But
>> since there is no CMOS power the default kicks in when the BIOS is
>> closed and boot-up continues. And the default is for no B: drive
>> whatsoever. I even tried attaching the 5.25 drive to the A: drive
>> controller. No joy. I suspect that getting a battery for the CMOS for
>> these old Win 95 machines would be not only difficult but expensive for
>> only a few dozen disks to copy to CDs or 3.5 floppies. These Intel boxes
>> don't have any clearly labeled locations for the batteries in any event.
>> I suspect the batteries are found in a clock chip but not labeled at
>> all. If I can get the computer to boot up just once with the B: drive
>> working I can create a Norton Utilities rescue disk that would solve the
>> problem in the future (it would allow a boot that enabled the B: drive
>> for future boots.) Hooking this thing via a network would be an awful
>> solution since Win 95 was not exactly network friendly at best.
>>
>> Does anyone know of a solution? Possibly a source for an external 5.25
>> floppy drive? A hardware tweak to get the built-in floppy drive to work?

>
> Too much to answer.
>
> Basicly look for a solder on battery, you don't need the battery if
> you just keep the power on (sometimes)
>
> A:\ drive can be swapped with B:\ drive in the BIOS, also you select
> the drive size in the bios (5.25)
>


It appears you missed what I wrote above. I tried setting up the 5.25
drive for the A: in the BIOS. Doesn't work. Since there is no active
CMOS (no battery for it) any changes to the BIOS fail and the default
setup is installed not the changed BIOS you created.

If I had been able to establish where the battery was I would have
replaced the battery or soldered an external dry cell to the terminals.

Since I can't get it boot up the way I want (with a recognized B: driver
there is no solution to saying that you just keep the power on. It first
has to boot the correct way once.
FK
 
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Fred Kasner
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-20-2008
Evan Platt wrote:
> On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 22:06:41 GMT, Fred Kasner <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>> This sounds like an archaic problem but here it goes. I ran across some
>> old disks (5.25 floppies 1.2 MB) that contain some data and some
>> programs that I really would like to save. Thus my problems began. I
>> have two old puters in the closet but can't use the 5.25 inch drives to
>> read the old disks. The old puters both have failed CMOS batteries
>> (really cells not batteries) so the B: drives can't be enabled. In both
>> cases the BIOS allows changing the specifics for the B: drives. But
>> since there is no CMOS power the default kicks in when the BIOS is
>> closed and boot-up continues. And the default is for no B: drive
>> whatsoever. I even tried attaching the 5.25 drive to the A: drive
>> controller. No joy. I suspect that getting a battery for the CMOS for
>> these old Win 95 machines would be not only difficult but expensive for
>> only a few dozen disks to copy to CDs or 3.5 floppies. These Intel boxes
>> don't have any clearly labeled locations for the batteries in any event.
>> I suspect the batteries are found in a clock chip but not labeled at
>> all. If I can get the computer to boot up just once with the B: drive
>> working I can create a Norton Utilities rescue disk that would solve the
>> problem in the future (it would allow a boot that enabled the B: drive
>> for future boots.) Hooking this thing via a network would be an awful
>> solution since Win 95 was not exactly network friendly at best.
>>
>> Does anyone know of a solution? Possibly a source for an external 5.25
>> floppy drive? A hardware tweak to get the built-in floppy drive to work?

>
> Take the drive out of the old computer. Put it in the new computer.


Not even sure that a new computer (I have three that are running XP)
would recognize a 5.25 drive. Worse yet none of them have space for a
second floppy drive other than an A: that is 3.5 inch.
FK
 
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Fred Kasner
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      03-20-2008
philo wrote:
> "Evan Platt" <evan@*******************************> wrote in message
> news(E-Mail Removed)...
>> On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 22:06:41 GMT, Fred Kasner <(E-Mail Removed)>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> This sounds like an archaic problem but here it goes. I ran across some
>>> old disks (5.25 floppies 1.2 MB) that contain some data and some
>>> programs that I really would like to save. Thus my problems began. I
>>> have two old puters in the closet but can't use the 5.25 inch drives to
>>> read the old disks. The old puters both have failed CMOS batteries
>>> (really cells not batteries) so the B: drives can't be enabled. In both
>>> cases the BIOS allows changing the specifics for the B: drives. But
>>> since there is no CMOS power the default kicks in when the BIOS is
>>> closed and boot-up continues. And the default is for no B: drive
>>> whatsoever. I even tried attaching the 5.25 drive to the A: drive
>>> controller. No joy. I suspect that getting a battery for the CMOS for
>>> these old Win 95 machines would be not only difficult but expensive for
>>> only a few dozen disks to copy to CDs or 3.5 floppies. These Intel boxes
>>> don't have any clearly labeled locations for the batteries in any event.
>>> I suspect the batteries are found in a clock chip but not labeled at
>>> all. If I can get the computer to boot up just once with the B: drive
>>> working I can create a Norton Utilities rescue disk that would solve the
>>> problem in the future (it would allow a boot that enabled the B: drive
>>> for future boots.) Hooking this thing via a network would be an awful
>>> solution since Win 95 was not exactly network friendly at best.
>>>
>>> Does anyone know of a solution? Possibly a source for an external 5.25
>>> floppy drive? A hardware tweak to get the built-in floppy drive to work?

>> Take the drive out of the old computer. Put it in the new computer.

>
>
>
> That's a very good suggestion.
>
> I just wanted to add that even if the cmos battery is dead.
> If the bios settings are changed but the machine is not turned off...they
> should hold
>
>


Where would such a drive go? The cases have room for two DVD drives and
a 3.5 floppy. No room for a 5.25 floppy.

What the computer you will it to do will not do. I have tried changing
the BIOS in two machines running Win 95 and you can put in the 5.25
floppy and you can change the BIOS to make the B: drive specs be for a
1.2 MB floppy or even a 360 KB floppy but when you close the BIOS edit
and instruct the computer to complete the boot up they both detect the
missing CMOS cell and set the BIOS to its default settings not the
changed ones. no joy.
FK
 
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Fred Kasner
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-20-2008
Gaius Baltar wrote:
> On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 15:20:55 -0700, Evan Platt
> <evan@*******************************> wrote:
>
>> Take the drive out of the old computer. Put it in the new computer.

>
> Never had any joy getting 5.25" 1.2 MB FDD (of which I have 2, well
> stored etc) to run in my more recent PCs, even under WIN95.
>
> gb


I'll try taking one of the DVD drives out of a 6 year old PC and try
setting the BIOS to set the B: to a 1.2 MB FDD. That might work but if
you can't get it to work I suspect I can't either. Another idea I just
had: if the command to use the default BIOS settings isn't part of the
MBR I may be able to start from the HD and set the BIOS and then finish
up the boot with a DOS floppy in the A: drive and maybe it won't force
the BIOS to go to the condition of ignoring the B: drive. It's worth a
try. Last process is one that will work. But It requires going to a
friend's house to use on of his old machines that can boot up to
recognize both 3.5 and 5.25 floppies as he boots them from a Norton
Utilities rescue disk even though the batteries died a long time ago. He
runs old science programs on those machines that were written in BASIC
and run under DOS. \
fK
 
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Lookout
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-20-2008
On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 22:06:41 GMT, Fred Kasner <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>This sounds like an archaic problem but here it goes. I ran across some
>old disks (5.25 floppies 1.2 MB) that contain some data and some
>programs that I really would like to save. Thus my problems began. I
>have two old puters in the closet but can't use the 5.25 inch drives to
>read the old disks. The old puters both have failed CMOS batteries
>(really cells not batteries) so the B: drives can't be enabled. In both
>cases the BIOS allows changing the specifics for the B: drives. But
>since there is no CMOS power the default kicks in when the BIOS is
>closed and boot-up continues. And the default is for no B: drive
>whatsoever. I even tried attaching the 5.25 drive to the A: drive
>controller. No joy. I suspect that getting a battery for the CMOS for
>these old Win 95 machines would be not only difficult but expensive for
>only a few dozen disks to copy to CDs or 3.5 floppies. These Intel boxes
>don't have any clearly labeled locations for the batteries in any event.
>I suspect the batteries are found in a clock chip but not labeled at
>all. If I can get the computer to boot up just once with the B: drive
>working I can create a Norton Utilities rescue disk that would solve the
>problem in the future (it would allow a boot that enabled the B: drive
>for future boots.) Hooking this thing via a network would be an awful
>solution since Win 95 was not exactly network friendly at best.
>
>Does anyone know of a solution? Possibly a source for an external 5.25
>floppy drive? A hardware tweak to get the built-in floppy drive to work?
>TIA.
>FK


You're local library?
 
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