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who decides the size of a data type?

 
 
christian.bau
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      03-20-2008
On Mar 16, 11:11*pm, CBFalconer <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> No, Willem. *The phrases "I have a doubt" and "my doubt" are quite
> ordinary English usage. *They are more popular in India than in
> most other English speaking areas. *I concede that many native
> English speakers don't recognize that, but their ignorance is of no
> concern. *


You are contradicting yourself here. If many native English speakers
don't recognise a phrase, then it is by definition not ordinary
English usage.

("I have a doubt" is of course an ordinary English sentence, but it
means something completely different from "I have a question").

But no matter what, if anyone has a question then they should write "I
have a question" and chances are much better that they will get an
answer instead of a lengthy thread about proper use of the English
language.
 
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CBFalconer
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      03-20-2008
"christian.bau" wrote:
> CBFalconer <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> No, Willem. The phrases "I have a doubt" and "my doubt" are
>> quite ordinary English usage. They are more popular in India
>> than in most other English speaking areas. I concede that many
>> native English speakers don't recognize that, but their
>> ignorance is of no concern.

>
> You are contradicting yourself here. If many native English
> speakers don't recognise a phrase, then it is by definition not
> ordinary English usage.
>
> ("I have a doubt" is of course an ordinary English sentence,
> but it means something completely different from "I have a
> question").


True. It means the originator 'has a doubt' about something or
other. It may be clearable by asking a question, deepening an
explanation, etc. It doesn't mean "I have a question". It does
express a lack of understanding. These are just simple English
words, placed in sequence, to express something. Not even
idiomatic.

--
[mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
[page]: <http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>
Try the download section.



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jacob navia
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      03-20-2008
christian.bau wrote:
> On Mar 16, 11:11 pm, CBFalconer <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> No, Willem. The phrases "I have a doubt" and "my doubt" are quite
>> ordinary English usage. They are more popular in India than in
>> most other English speaking areas. I concede that many native
>> English speakers don't recognize that, but their ignorance is of no
>> concern.

>
> You are contradicting yourself here. If many native English speakers
> don't recognise a phrase, then it is by definition not ordinary
> English usage.


[snip english grammar discussion]

So, speaking about debuggers and what happens when a program
crash is off topic for mr Bau. Obviously, discussing
english grammar is not.

This is an example of the double standards that the regulars
use:

If I discuss english grammar is ON TOPIC in c.l.c

If Jacob discusses debuggers and debugging that is OFF TOPIC


--
jacob navia
jacob at jacob point remcomp point fr
logiciels/informatique
http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32
 
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Richard
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      03-20-2008
jacob navia <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> christian.bau wrote:
>> On Mar 16, 11:11 pm, CBFalconer <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> No, Willem. The phrases "I have a doubt" and "my doubt" are quite
>>> ordinary English usage. They are more popular in India than in
>>> most other English speaking areas. I concede that many native
>>> English speakers don't recognize that, but their ignorance is of no
>>> concern.

>>
>> You are contradicting yourself here. If many native English speakers
>> don't recognise a phrase, then it is by definition not ordinary
>> English usage.

>
> [snip english grammar discussion]
>
> So, speaking about debuggers and what happens when a program
> crash is off topic for mr Bau. Obviously, discussing
> english grammar is not.
>
> This is an example of the double standards that the regulars
> use:
>
> If I discuss english grammar is ON TOPIC in c.l.c
>
> If Jacob discusses debuggers and debugging that is OFF TOPIC


Mr Bau has clearly demonstrated which side of common sense he is on.
 
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CBFalconer
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      03-21-2008
jacob navia wrote:
> christian.bau wrote:
>> CBFalconer <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> No, Willem. The phrases "I have a doubt" and "my doubt" are
>>> quite ordinary English usage. They are more popular in India
>>> than in most other English speaking areas. I concede that
>>> many native English speakers don't recognize that, but their
>>> ignorance is of no concern.

>>
>> You are contradicting yourself here. If many native English
>> speakers don't recognise a phrase, then it is by definition not
>> ordinary English usage.

>
> [snip english grammar discussion]
>
> So, speaking about debuggers and what happens when a program crash
> is off topic for mr Bau. Obviously, discussing english grammar is
> not. This is an example of the double standards that the regulars
> use: If I discuss english grammar is ON TOPIC in c.l.c. If Jacob
> discusses debuggers and debugging that is OFF TOPIC


Well, I let this sit for almost 24 hours before replying. This is
another horrible example of Navias irritation tactics. It would be
quite sufficient to post a short reply saying something like "I
consider this off-topic", and see what response is generated.
Instead he immediately draws back a fist and smashes all nearby in
the nose(s). Note the generic use of 'regulars' to denote any user
that ever expressed disagreement with Navia.

--
[mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
[page]: <http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>
Try the download section.



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Keith Thompson
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      03-21-2008
CBFalconer <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> "christian.bau" wrote:
>> CBFalconer <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> No, Willem. The phrases "I have a doubt" and "my doubt" are
>>> quite ordinary English usage. They are more popular in India
>>> than in most other English speaking areas. I concede that many
>>> native English speakers don't recognize that, but their
>>> ignorance is of no concern.

>>
>> You are contradicting yourself here. If many native English
>> speakers don't recognise a phrase, then it is by definition not
>> ordinary English usage.
>>
>> ("I have a doubt" is of course an ordinary English sentence,
>> but it means something completely different from "I have a
>> question").

>
> True. It means the originator 'has a doubt' about something or
> other. It may be clearable by asking a question, deepening an
> explanation, etc. It doesn't mean "I have a question". It does
> express a lack of understanding. These are just simple English
> words, placed in sequence, to express something. Not even
> idiomatic.


The point I think you're missing is that in the Indian dialect of
English, the word "doubt" apparently *is* commonly used to mean
"question".

I won't debate whether this usage is correct, but it wouldn't hurt for
readers of this newsgroup to be aware that it exists. (It's hard to
see how a regular reader could avoid being aware of it, since it's
been discussed here numerous times.)

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <(E-Mail Removed)>
Nokia
"We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
-- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
 
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Richard Heathfield
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      03-21-2008
Keith Thompson said:

<snip>
>
> The point I think you're missing is that in the Indian dialect of
> English, the word "doubt" apparently *is* commonly used to mean
> "question".


The point I think /you're/ missing is that we are constantly enjoined to be
generous in what we accept, but strict in what we produce. And we try to
be. But it would sure be good if some *other people* tried doing the same
thing.

Programmers are supposed to be amongst the brightest people on the planet.
They should be able to *learn*. When people show an inability or
unwillingness to learn, that doesn't bode well for their future career as
a programmer.

> I won't debate whether this usage is correct, but it wouldn't hurt for
> readers of this newsgroup to be aware that it exists.


Agreed, but it also wouldn't hurt for writers to this newsgroup to read the
group for a while before posting, and learn how to use the word
'question'.

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
 
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Richard Bos
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      03-21-2008
Keith Thompson <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> CBFalconer <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> > "christian.bau" wrote:
> >> ("I have a doubt" is of course an ordinary English sentence,
> >> but it means something completely different from "I have a
> >> question").

> >
> > True. It means the originator 'has a doubt' about something or
> > other. It may be clearable by asking a question, deepening an
> > explanation, etc. It doesn't mean "I have a question". It does
> > express a lack of understanding. These are just simple English
> > words, placed in sequence, to express something. Not even
> > idiomatic.

>
> The point I think you're missing is that in the Indian dialect of
> English, the word "doubt" apparently *is* commonly used to mean
> "question".


Whereas I'm (un?)reliably informed that in the London dialect, "bare" is
used to mean "very", and "cheers" means "thank you". Shall we adopt
those, as well, on this barely legible newsgroup?

Richard
 
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Joe Wright
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-21-2008
Richard Heathfield wrote:
> Keith Thompson said:
>
> <snip>
>> The point I think you're missing is that in the Indian dialect of
>> English, the word "doubt" apparently *is* commonly used to mean
>> "question".

>
> The point I think /you're/ missing is that we are constantly enjoined to be
> generous in what we accept, but strict in what we produce. And we try to
> be. But it would sure be good if some *other people* tried doing the same
> thing.
>
> Programmers are supposed to be amongst the brightest people on the planet.
> They should be able to *learn*. When people show an inability or
> unwillingness to learn, that doesn't bode well for their future career as
> a programmer.
>
>> I won't debate whether this usage is correct, but it wouldn't hurt for
>> readers of this newsgroup to be aware that it exists.

>
> Agreed, but it also wouldn't hurt for writers to this newsgroup to read the
> group for a while before posting, and learn how to use the word
> 'question'.
>

I believe you're much too strict. 'Correct' English is determined by
usage. Americans and Australians can use English somewhat differently
than Britains but just as correctly. So Indians.

--
Joe Wright
"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."
--- Albert Einstein ---
 
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CBFalconer
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-21-2008
Richard Bos wrote:
> Keith Thompson <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> CBFalconer <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
>>> "christian.bau" wrote:
>>>
>>>> ("I have a doubt" is of course an ordinary English sentence,
>>>> but it means something completely different from "I have a
>>>> question").
>>>
>>> True. It means the originator 'has a doubt' about something or
>>> other. It may be clearable by asking a question, deepening an
>>> explanation, etc. It doesn't mean "I have a question". It does
>>> express a lack of understanding. These are just simple English
>>> words, placed in sequence, to express something. Not even
>>> idiomatic.

>>
>> The point I think you're missing is that in the Indian dialect of
>> English, the word "doubt" apparently *is* commonly used to mean
>> "question".

>
> Whereas I'm (un?)reliably informed that in the London dialect,
> "bare" is used to mean "very", and "cheers" means "thank you".
> Shall we adopt those, as well, on this barely legible newsgroup?


Ah, at last, a sane proposal. This might well settle the whole
nasty problem. Much better than simply accepting the slightly
offbeat Indian phraseology.

--
[mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
[page]: <http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>
Try the download section.



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