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who decides the size of a data type?

 
 
Richard Heathfield
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      03-17-2008
CBFalconer said:

<snip>

> The phrases "I have a doubt" and "my doubt" are quite
> ordinary English usage.


You might want to tell the dictionary people, then. Your expertise in
English usage clearly exceeds theirs, and the usage you mention has
completely passed them by.

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
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Keith Thompson
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      03-17-2008
Willem <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> rao wrote:

[...]
> ) My doubt is who decides the size of the integer?
>
> In India, do 'doubt' and 'question' translate to the same word ?
> In any case, the right word to use in English is 'question'.

[...]

In Indian English, "doubt" is often used as a synonym for "question".
In dialects of English outside India, "doubt" has a connotation of
disbelief.

Non-Indian readers need to understand this. Indian posters should, I
suggest, try to use the word "question" rather than "doubt" when
posting in international forums like this one to avoid confusion.

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <(E-Mail Removed)>
Nokia
"We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
-- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
 
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Richard Heathfield
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      03-17-2008
Keith Thompson said:

<snip>

> In Indian English, "doubt" is often used as a synonym for "question".
> In dialects of English outside India, "doubt" has a connotation of
> disbelief.
>
> Non-Indian readers need to understand this.


No. If non-Indian readers /do/ understand, it's a bonus, but it is *not* a
requirement. A seeker after (effective) help cannot get that help if he or
she does not make himself or herself understood. Thus, it is in the
seeker's interest to use English in the canonical way.

<snip>

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
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William Ahern
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      03-17-2008
Richard Heathfield <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Keith Thompson said:


> <snip>
>
> > In Indian English, "doubt" is often used as a synonym for "question".
> > In dialects of English outside India, "doubt" has a connotation of
> > disbelief.
> >
> > Non-Indian readers need to understand this.


> No. If non-Indian readers /do/ understand, it's a bonus, but it is *not* a
> requirement. A seeker after (effective) help cannot get that help if he or
> she does not make himself or herself understood. Thus, it is in the
> seeker's interest to use English in the canonical way.


So, before a poster can seek help in mastering the C language, they should
first master Oxford English?

The OP's intended meaning was clear from the context, if not from a
reasonable interpretation of the word itself. This case is entirely
different from someone using l33t speak, which is intended to _exclude_
readers, and where it might be reasonable to take offence at the person's
presumed motivation or impoliteness.
 
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Richard Heathfield
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      03-17-2008
William Ahern said:

> Richard Heathfield <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> Keith Thompson said:

>
>> <snip>
>>
>> > In Indian English, "doubt" is often used as a synonym for "question".
>> > In dialects of English outside India, "doubt" has a connotation of
>> > disbelief.
>> >
>> > Non-Indian readers need to understand this.

>
>> No. If non-Indian readers /do/ understand, it's a bonus, but it is *not*
>> a requirement. A seeker after (effective) help cannot get that help if
>> he or she does not make himself or herself understood. Thus, it is in
>> the seeker's interest to use English in the canonical way.

>
> So, before a poster can seek help in mastering the C language, they
> should first master Oxford English?


That isn't what I said. What I said was that someone who seeks help can
maximise their chances of getting help by using the language of the helper
in the most effective way they can achieve. In this specific case, the
barrier raised by the acanonical use of "doubt" was a very low one, easily
scaled - but nobody is *obliged* to jump over hurdles in order to answer a
question, so it's in the questioner's interest to present as few hurdles
as possible. That's a far cry from insisting on an OP's mastery of Oxford
English.

> The OP's intended meaning was clear from the context, if not from a
> reasonable interpretation of the word itself. This case is entirely
> different from someone using l33t speak, which is intended to _exclude_
> readers, and where it might be reasonable to take offence at the person's
> presumed motivation or impoliteness.


I agree. Nevertheless, it's still a good idea for OPs to minimise the risk
of putting people off from answering the question, by maximising their
knowledge of English. Note that "good idea" != "rule".

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
 
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jacob navia
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      03-17-2008
Keith Thompson wrote:
> Willem <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
>> rao wrote:

> [...]
>> ) My doubt is who decides the size of the integer?
>>
>> In India, do 'doubt' and 'question' translate to the same word ?
>> In any case, the right word to use in English is 'question'.

> [...]
>
> In Indian English, "doubt" is often used as a synonym for "question".
> In dialects of English outside India, "doubt" has a connotation of
> disbelief.
>
> Non-Indian readers need to understand this. Indian posters should, I
> suggest, try to use the word "question" rather than "doubt" when
> posting in international forums like this one to avoid confusion.
>


Who cares about oxford english?

This is an international forum. It is enough that we have to use
english instead of a commonly recognized international language
like latin, french or esperanto





--
jacob navia
jacob at jacob point remcomp point fr
logiciels/informatique
http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32
 
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Ian Collins
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      03-17-2008
jacob navia wrote:
> Keith Thompson wrote:
>> Willem <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
>>> rao wrote:

>> [...]
>>> ) My doubt is who decides the size of the integer?
>>>
>>> In India, do 'doubt' and 'question' translate to the same word ?
>>> In any case, the right word to use in English is 'question'.

>> [...]
>>
>> In Indian English, "doubt" is often used as a synonym for "question".
>> In dialects of English outside India, "doubt" has a connotation of
>> disbelief.
>>
>> Non-Indian readers need to understand this. Indian posters should, I
>> suggest, try to use the word "question" rather than "doubt" when
>> posting in international forums like this one to avoid confusion.
>>

>
> Who cares about oxford english?
>

The English inhabitants of Oxford?

--
Ian Collins.
 
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Richard Heathfield
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      03-17-2008
jacob navia said:

<snip>

> This is an international forum. It is enough that we have to use
> english instead of a commonly recognized international language
> like latin, french or esperanto
>
>


fr.comp.lang.c exists.

--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
Google users: <http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/writings/googly.php>
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
 
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jacob navia
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      03-17-2008
Ian Collins wrote:
> jacob navia wrote:
>> Who cares about oxford english?
>>

> The English inhabitants of Oxford?
>

They do not read comp.lang.c anyway.


--
jacob navia
jacob at jacob point remcomp point fr
logiciels/informatique
http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32
 
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Chris Dollin
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      03-17-2008
jacob navia wrote:

> Ian Collins wrote:
>> jacob navia wrote:
>>> Who cares about oxford english?
>>>

>> The English inhabitants of Oxford?
>>

> They do not read comp.lang.c anyway.


Why would my moving (back) to Oxford cause me to abandon this newsgroup?

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