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Why Need To Learn Chinese?

 
 
sunprecipice@gmail.com
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-21-2008
Why Need To Learn Chinese?
Chinese is used by more people in the world than any other language.
The official language used throughout China is Putonghua
(Modern Standard Chinese; also sometimes referred to as 'Mandarin').
Putonghua is also one of the working languages of the United
Nations.
It is not only spoken in the People's Republic of China,
Taiwan and Singapore but also used in Southeast Asian
countries and other parts of the world where Chinese-speaking
communities are present. Chinese is a fascinating language to study.
The spoken language has a simple structure, and it uses tones
to give different meanings to a word. Chinese character writing
is governed by rules which can be easily learned: it is challenging
but
rewarding. Learning the language is a window into understanding
Chinese
culture and the Chinese way of life.

open the website http://oumei.zhan.cn.yahoo.com
you can see " learn chinese"
 
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philo
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      02-21-2008

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Why Need To Learn Chinese?
> Chinese is used by more people in the world than any other language.
> The official language used throughout China is Putonghua
> (Modern Standard Chinese; also sometimes referred to as 'Mandarin').
> Putonghua is also one of the working languages of the United
> Nations.
> It is not only spoken in the People's Republic of China,
> Taiwan and Singapore but also used in Southeast Asian
> countries and other parts of the world where Chinese-speaking
> communities are present. Chinese is a fascinating language to study.
> The spoken language has a simple structure, and it uses tones
> to give different meanings to a word. Chinese character writing
> is governed by rules which can be easily learned: it is challenging
> but
> rewarding. Learning the language is a window into understanding
> Chinese
> culture and the Chinese way of life.
>
> open the website http://oumei.zhan.cn.yahoo.com
> you can see " learn chinese"



I am sure that I am too stupid to ever be able to learn Chinese...
but I was always curious about the language...
Just looking at the letters, the whole thing seemed totally
incomprehensible...

But still, I decided to study the language...
not really to learn it...
but merely at least have a glimpse of it's structure...
and how one could possibly go about deciphering it.

I went to my local library and took home a few books...
and at least got to see how a few simple strokes make a word...
then how more strokes are added, to make additional words...etc.

Anyway, the only way I'd even have even the slightest hope of learning the
language
would be to go to China and live there for the rest of my life.

Now, here is the funny thing I was going to say:

One of the books I brought home from our fine local library
was a Chinese to English dictionary.

When I got home the first thing I noticed was that it was written in 1939.
That was bad enough...but the real kicker was that it had originally been
a Chinese to *French* dictionary that had later had the French , in turn,
translated to English.

Ergo: I you want to learn Chinese, probably best to just move to China I'd
say<G>


 
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Whiskers
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-21-2008
On 2008-02-21, philo <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Why Need To Learn Chinese?


[...]

> When I got home the first thing I noticed was that it was written in 1939.
> That was bad enough...but the real kicker was that it had originally been
> a Chinese to *French* dictionary that had later had the French , in turn,
> translated to English.


混乱 (with acknowledgement or blame to Babelfish).

> Ergo: I you want to learn Chinese, probably best to just move to China I'd
> say<G>


Or "China town" in one of many cities around the world )

--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
 
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Brian Cryer
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-21-2008
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Why Need To Learn Chinese?
> Chinese is used by more people in the world than any other language.


Whilst this is true, my understanding is that outside of China, English is
still the most commonly spoken language.
--
Brian Cryer
www.cryer.co.uk/brian


 
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catchme
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-21-2008
philo wrote:
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Why Need To Learn Chinese?
>> Chinese is used by more people in the world than any other language.
>> The official language used throughout China is Putonghua
>> (Modern Standard Chinese; also sometimes referred to as 'Mandarin').
>> Putonghua is also one of the working languages of the United
>> Nations.
>> It is not only spoken in the People's Republic of China,
>> Taiwan and Singapore but also used in Southeast Asian
>> countries and other parts of the world where Chinese-speaking
>> communities are present. Chinese is a fascinating language to study.
>> The spoken language has a simple structure, and it uses tones
>> to give different meanings to a word. Chinese character writing
>> is governed by rules which can be easily learned: it is challenging
>> but
>> rewarding. Learning the language is a window into understanding
>> Chinese
>> culture and the Chinese way of life.
>>
>> open the website http://oumei.zhan.cn.yahoo.com
>> you can see " learn chinese"

>
>
> I am sure that I am too stupid to ever be able to learn Chinese...
> but I was always curious about the language...
> Just looking at the letters, the whole thing seemed totally
> incomprehensible...
>
> But still, I decided to study the language...
> not really to learn it...
> but merely at least have a glimpse of it's structure...
> and how one could possibly go about deciphering it.
>
> I went to my local library and took home a few books...
> and at least got to see how a few simple strokes make a word...
> then how more strokes are added, to make additional words...etc.
>
> Anyway, the only way I'd even have even the slightest hope of learning the
> language
> would be to go to China and live there for the rest of my life.
>
> Now, here is the funny thing I was going to say:
>
> One of the books I brought home from our fine local library
> was a Chinese to English dictionary.
>
> When I got home the first thing I noticed was that it was written in 1939.
> That was bad enough...but the real kicker was that it had originally been
> a Chinese to *French* dictionary that had later had the French , in turn,
> translated to English.
>
> Ergo: I you want to learn Chinese, probably best to just move to China I'd
> say<G>
>
>

i have a japanese wife, so therefore i have devoted much time studying
Japanese (nihongo).
memorizing the "50 sounds" table (Japanese, Korean, and Chinese use
sounds rather than letters in their version of an alphabet) was
relatively easy, while studying katakana and hiragana (japanese written
languages- katakana for foreign words, and hiragana for japanese native
words).
Because Japanese use fewer sounds than Chinese, their kanji is also
fewer (apprx. 22,000 japanese as opposed to almost 60,000 chinese) so i
think should be easier for me to learn.
Also, Japanese are increasingly adopting a number of english words into
their own language/ culture, substituting them from their own native
language!
Previously they had "chiisai, hutsu and okii" sizes- now when going to a
resutoran (restaurant) they order size by "s, m, l"- or more formally,
"small, medium, lage".
Now getting into kanji is harder- while each knaji itself has meaning,
when placing them together their meaning may be altered depending upon
the neighbouring kanji.
Each kanji is attributed to a sound, or combination of up to three
sounds- but there are many kanji to each sound (50 sounds- over 22000
kanji).
I know 4 kanji currently- and all of them can be read by chinese for the
same meaning....but the SOUND attributed to them sometimes varies.
For example, the japanese kanji "inochi" (life), may be read as "life by
chinese- but given an entirely different sound.
It is important to note too that this particular kanji also reads the
same in korean "han- mun" (korean kanji)- the same meaning, and yet
again a different sound.
The kanji "hana" (flower) is same for chinese and japanese- and also the
same sound.
It is easier for me right now to memorise kanji by their name and sound,
than to learn how the various parts of a kanji may be identified by
their radicals, etc., and therefore to deconstruct the kanji into its
aprts....besides this deconstruction of the kanji is what led to the
creation of hiragana and katakana in the first place!
 
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catchme
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-21-2008
Whiskers wrote:
> On 2008-02-21, philo <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> Why Need To Learn Chinese?

>
> [...]
>
>> When I got home the first thing I noticed was that it was written in 1939.
>> That was bad enough...but the real kicker was that it had originally been
>> a Chinese to *French* dictionary that had later had the French , in turn,
>> translated to English.

>
> 混乱 (with acknowledgement or blame to Babelfish).
>
>> Ergo: I you want to learn Chinese, probably best to just move to China I'd
>> say<G>

>
> Or "China town" in one of many cities around the world )
>

おは伊予ございます!私の日本語弁居 ます。会話の日本語連取しま線ーよ 。ハ
イ、また*!
 
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catchme
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-21-2008
Brian Cryer wrote:
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Why Need To Learn Chinese?
>> Chinese is used by more people in the world than any other language.

>
> Whilst this is true, my understanding is that outside of China, English is
> still the most commonly spoken language.


i have no opinion on whether English is spoken throughout the world- but
it has become evident that the lazy-tongued 'American' equivalent
appears to becoming the predominant language.
What that portents for linguistic communication in the very near future,
is daunting to begin contemplating!
Mayhap one may consider anything longer than acronyms to belong in the
literature category- to be stuffed on a shelf gathering dust!
 
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Whiskers
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-21-2008
On 2008-02-21, catchme <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Whiskers wrote:
>> On 2008-02-21, philo <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>> Why Need To Learn Chinese?

>>
>> [...]
>>
>>> When I got home the first thing I noticed was that it was written in 1939.
>>> That was bad enough...but the real kicker was that it had originally been
>>> a Chinese to *French* dictionary that had later had the French , in turn,
>>> translated to English.

>>
>> 混乱 (with acknowledgement or blame to Babelfish).
>>
>>> Ergo: I you want to learn Chinese, probably best to just move to China I'd
>>> say<G>

>>
>> Or "China town" in one of many cities around the world )
>>

> おは伊予ございます!私の日本語弁居 ます。会話の日本語連取しま線ーよ 。ハ
> イ、また*!


The fish says;

There is Iyo! My Japanese valve it stays. Japanese connected taking stripe
line of conversation -. Don't you think? ハ イ, in addition!

Gurer'f abg n ybg V pna fnl gb gung.

--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
 
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philo
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-21-2008

"catchme" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:UYivj.67261$FA.35572@pd7urf2no...
> philo wrote:
> > <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >> Why Need To Learn Chinese?
> >> Chinese is used by more people in the world than any other language.
> >> The official language used throughout China is Putonghua
> >> (Modern Standard Chinese; also sometimes referred to as 'Mandarin').
> >> Putonghua is also one of the working languages of the United
> >> Nations.
> >> It is not only spoken in the People's Republic of China,
> >> Taiwan and Singapore but also used in Southeast Asian
> >> countries and other parts of the world where Chinese-speaking
> >> communities are present. Chinese is a fascinating language to study.
> >> The spoken language has a simple structure, and it uses tones
> >> to give different meanings to a word. Chinese character writing
> >> is governed by rules which can be easily learned: it is challenging
> >> but
> >> rewarding. Learning the language is a window into understanding
> >> Chinese
> >> culture and the Chinese way of life.
> >>
> >> open the website http://oumei.zhan.cn.yahoo.com
> >> you can see " learn chinese"

> >
> >
> > I am sure that I am too stupid to ever be able to learn Chinese...
> > but I was always curious about the language...
> > Just looking at the letters, the whole thing seemed totally
> > incomprehensible...
> >
> > But still, I decided to study the language...
> > not really to learn it...
> > but merely at least have a glimpse of it's structure...
> > and how one could possibly go about deciphering it.
> >
> > I went to my local library and took home a few books...
> > and at least got to see how a few simple strokes make a word...
> > then how more strokes are added, to make additional words...etc.
> >
> > Anyway, the only way I'd even have even the slightest hope of learning

the
> > language
> > would be to go to China and live there for the rest of my life.
> >
> > Now, here is the funny thing I was going to say:
> >
> > One of the books I brought home from our fine local library
> > was a Chinese to English dictionary.
> >
> > When I got home the first thing I noticed was that it was written in

1939.
> > That was bad enough...but the real kicker was that it had originally

been
> > a Chinese to *French* dictionary that had later had the French , in

turn,
> > translated to English.
> >
> > Ergo: I you want to learn Chinese, probably best to just move to China

I'd
> > say<G>
> >
> >

> i have a japanese wife, so therefore i have devoted much time studying
> Japanese (nihongo).
> memorizing the "50 sounds" table (Japanese, Korean, and Chinese use
> sounds rather than letters in their version of an alphabet) was
> relatively easy, while studying katakana and hiragana (japanese written
> languages- katakana for foreign words, and hiragana for japanese native
> words).
> Because Japanese use fewer sounds than Chinese, their kanji is also
> fewer (apprx. 22,000 japanese as opposed to almost 60,000 chinese) so i
> think should be easier for me to learn.
> Also, Japanese are increasingly adopting a number of english words into
> their own language/ culture, substituting them from their own native
> language!
> Previously they had "chiisai, hutsu and okii" sizes- now when going to a
> resutoran (restaurant) they order size by "s, m, l"- or more formally,
> "small, medium, lage".
> Now getting into kanji is harder- while each knaji itself has meaning,
> when placing them together their meaning may be altered depending upon
> the neighbouring kanji.
> Each kanji is attributed to a sound, or combination of up to three
> sounds- but there are many kanji to each sound (50 sounds- over 22000
> kanji).
> I know 4 kanji currently- and all of them can be read by chinese for the
> same meaning....but the SOUND attributed to them sometimes varies.
> For example, the japanese kanji "inochi" (life), may be read as "life by
> chinese- but given an entirely different sound.
> It is important to note too that this particular kanji also reads the
> same in korean "han- mun" (korean kanji)- the same meaning, and yet
> again a different sound.
> The kanji "hana" (flower) is same for chinese and japanese- and also the
> same sound.
> It is easier for me right now to memorise kanji by their name and sound,
> than to learn how the various parts of a kanji may be identified by
> their radicals, etc., and therefore to deconstruct the kanji into its
> aprts....besides this deconstruction of the kanji is what led to the
> creation of hiragana and katakana in the first place!



Yes, I also got a few books on Japanese too.
It seemed even more complicated that Chinese , if anything.
The one thing I did notice is there there are a lot of subtly different
vowel sounds such as: ru, ri, ra

I have a number of friends both Chinese and Japanese but I'd never be able
to speak to them in their
native language.

Once, when I was at a friend's house I picked up a letter he had sitting on
his desk and was just staring at
all the Chinese characters in utter amazement.

Then my friend came running over and snapped the letter out of my hands
and said: "Hey, that's private!"

Before I could explain anything, he realized that of course I could not read
it...
and we both started laughing!


 
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philo
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      02-21-2008

"Brian Cryer" <brian.cryer@127.0.0.1.ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Why Need To Learn Chinese?
> > Chinese is used by more people in the world than any other language.

>
> Whilst this is true, my understanding is that outside of China, English is
> still the most commonly spoken language.
>


Yes, English is often considered a universal language.
It's my understanding that all air traffic communication must be done in
English


 
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