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Serious laptop repairs - help needed

 
 
Ray Greene
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-21-2007
I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
fan and heatsink.

I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on so
I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.

The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm diameter
and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert and the
standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.

Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to use?

Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
http://www.laptoprepair101.com/lapto...ervice-manual/

--
Ray Greene
 
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SteveM
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-21-2007
Ray Greene <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
news:(E-Mail Removed):

> I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
> motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
> some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
> fan and heatsink.
>
> I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on so
> I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
>
> The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm diameter
> and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert and the
> standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
>
> Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to use?
>
> Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
> manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
> http://www.laptoprepair101.com/lapto...ervice-manual/
>


Loctite won't last. You need to resolder them on using a hot air
soldering
unit, (not the normal hot metal tip type). I've done it several times
on Acer notebook motherboards.

Not sure where you might get access to one; maybe your local Tisco or
Next
or neighbourhood TV repair shop may be able to help.

SteveM
 
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Ray Greene
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2007
On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:10:09 +0000 (UTC), SteveM <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>Ray Greene <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
>news:(E-Mail Removed) :
>
>> I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
>> motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
>> some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
>> fan and heatsink.
>>
>> I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on so
>> I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
>>
>> The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm diameter
>> and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert and the
>> standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
>>
>> Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to use?
>>
>> Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
>> manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
>> http://www.laptoprepair101.com/lapto...ervice-manual/
>>

>
>Loctite won't last. You need to resolder them on using a hot air
>soldering
>unit, (not the normal hot metal tip type). I've done it several times
>on Acer notebook motherboards.
>
>Not sure where you might get access to one; maybe your local Tisco or
>Next
>or neighbourhood TV repair shop may be able to help.


Thanks for the advice Steve. I'm unfamiliar with hot air soldering
though, what makes it better than a conventional soldering iron for a
job like this?

--
Ray Greene
 
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big cat
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2007
On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:05:24 +1200, Ray Greene <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
>motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
>some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
>fan and heatsink.
>
>I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on so
>I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
>
>The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm diameter
>and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert and the
>standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
>
>Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to use?
>
>Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
>manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
>http://www.laptoprepair101.com/lapto...ervice-manual/



No Dump it and get a Real brand Lap Top..


 
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Gordon
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2007
On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:05:24 +1200, Ray Greene wrote:

> I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on so
> I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.


Yes! Posting of the month, the year is fast following the decade.

 
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Nicolaas Hawkins
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2007
On Sun, 22 Jul 2007 16:41:01 +1200, big cat <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
<news:(E-Mail Removed) >:

> On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:05:24 +1200, Ray Greene <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
>>motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
>>some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
>>fan and heatsink.
>>
>>I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on so
>>I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
>>
>>The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm diameter
>>and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert and the
>>standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
>>
>>Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to use?
>>
>>Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
>>manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
>>http://www.laptoprepair101.com/lapto...ervice-manual/

>
> No Dump it and get a Real brand Lap Top..


Looks like Sheppard's changed his underwear and his nym again... big pussy
would be far more appropriate than big cat.

Meow!
 
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SteveM
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2007
Ray Greene <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
news:(E-Mail Removed):

> On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:10:09 +0000 (UTC), SteveM <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>>Ray Greene <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
>>news:(E-Mail Removed) m:
>>
>>> I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
>>> motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
>>> some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
>>> fan and heatsink.
>>>
>>> I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on
>>> so I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
>>>
>>> The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm
>>> diameter and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert
>>> and the standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
>>>
>>> Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to
>>> use?
>>>
>>> Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
>>> manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
>>> http://www.laptoprepair101.com/lapto...ervice-manual/
>>>

>>
>>Loctite won't last. You need to resolder them on using a hot air
>>soldering
>>unit, (not the normal hot metal tip type). I've done it several times
>>on Acer notebook motherboards.
>>
>>Not sure where you might get access to one; maybe your local Tisco or
>>Next
>>or neighbourhood TV repair shop may be able to help.

>
> Thanks for the advice Steve. I'm unfamiliar with hot air soldering
> though, what makes it better than a conventional soldering iron for a
> job like this?
>


Using a normal soldering iron requires you to heat the whole standoff up
to the temp required to melt the solder. This usually causes damage to
the motherboard. Using hot air gives you more control to direct the heat
specifically at the solder and not the standoff itself. With the use of
a little solder flux, you are able to flow the solder around the
standoff a lot faster and with a lower overall heat minimising any
potential damage.

(You do have to be careful not to blow any nearby SMD components off the
board while you're at it though!)

SteveM


 
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Mark Robinson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2007
SteveM wrote:
> Ray Greene <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
> news:(E-Mail Removed):
>
>> On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:10:09 +0000 (UTC), SteveM <(E-Mail Removed)>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Ray Greene <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
>>> news:(E-Mail Removed):
>>>
>>>> I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
>>>> motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
>>>> some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
>>>> fan and heatsink.
>>>>
>>>> I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on
>>>> so I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
>>>>
>>>> The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm
>>>> diameter and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert
>>>> and the standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
>>>>
>>>> Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to
>>>> use?
>>>>
>>>> Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
>>>> manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
>>>> http://www.laptoprepair101.com/lapto...ervice-manual/
>>>>
>>> Loctite won't last. You need to resolder them on using a hot air
>>> soldering
>>> unit, (not the normal hot metal tip type). I've done it several times
>>> on Acer notebook motherboards.
>>>
>>> Not sure where you might get access to one; maybe your local Tisco or
>>> Next
>>> or neighbourhood TV repair shop may be able to help.

>> Thanks for the advice Steve. I'm unfamiliar with hot air soldering
>> though, what makes it better than a conventional soldering iron for a
>> job like this?
>>

>
> Using a normal soldering iron requires you to heat the whole standoff up
> to the temp required to melt the solder. This usually causes damage to
> the motherboard. Using hot air gives you more control to direct the heat
> specifically at the solder and not the standoff itself. With the use of
> a little solder flux, you are able to flow the solder around the
> standoff a lot faster and with a lower overall heat minimising any
> potential damage.
>
> (You do have to be careful not to blow any nearby SMD components off the
> board while you're at it though!)


I take issue with this.

Hot air soldering is more likely to damage the pcb and surrounding components
than using a well sized conventional soldering iron when reattaching standoffs.

You have to wait a long time for the hot air to heat the standoff up to
soldering temperature, meanwhile the hot air is heating up the resin of the pcb
and damaging it and damaging the solder joints of surrounding components.

For a successful repair ensure that you remove as much as possible of the old
solder before resoldering the joint.

Adhesives are a poor solution.
 
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Rob S
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2007
Mark Robinson wrote:
> SteveM wrote:
>> Ray Greene <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
>> news:(E-Mail Removed):
>>> On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:10:09 +0000 (UTC), SteveM <(E-Mail Removed)>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Ray Greene <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed):
>>>>
>>>>> I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
>>>>> motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
>>>>> some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
>>>>> fan and heatsink.
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on
>>>>> so I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
>>>>>
>>>>> The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm
>>>>> diameter and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert
>>>>> and the standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
>>>>>
>>>>> Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to
>>>>> use?
>>>>> Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
>>>>> manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
>>>>> http://www.laptoprepair101.com/lapto...ervice-manual/
>>>>>
>>>> Loctite won't last. You need to resolder them on using a hot air
>>>> soldering
>>>> unit, (not the normal hot metal tip type). I've done it several times
>>>> on Acer notebook motherboards.
>>>>
>>>> Not sure where you might get access to one; maybe your local Tisco
>>>> or Next
>>>> or neighbourhood TV repair shop may be able to help.
>>> Thanks for the advice Steve. I'm unfamiliar with hot air soldering
>>> though, what makes it better than a conventional soldering iron for a
>>> job like this?
>>>

>>
>> Using a normal soldering iron requires you to heat the whole standoff up
>> to the temp required to melt the solder. This usually causes damage to
>> the motherboard. Using hot air gives you more control to direct the heat
>> specifically at the solder and not the standoff itself. With the use of
>> a little solder flux, you are able to flow the solder around the
>> standoff a lot faster and with a lower overall heat minimising any
>> potential damage.
>> (You do have to be careful not to blow any nearby SMD components off the
>> board while you're at it though!)

>
> I take issue with this.
>
> Hot air soldering is more likely to damage the pcb and surrounding
> components than using a well sized conventional soldering iron when
> reattaching standoffs.
>
> You have to wait a long time for the hot air to heat the standoff up to
> soldering temperature, meanwhile the hot air is heating up the resin of
> the pcb and damaging it and damaging the solder joints of surrounding
> components.
>
> For a successful repair ensure that you remove as much as possible of
> the old solder before resoldering the joint.
>
> Adhesives are a poor solution.


Why are adhesives a bad idea? There is no need for a good electrical
connection, just a good mechanical fix. As long as the standoff is
fitted in the correct place and not tilted or bent in any direction, a 2
part resin should do the job nicely. Any heat from the motherboard only
helps to cure the resin, resulting in a stronger joint.

--

Rob
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
http://aspir8or.blogspot.com
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


Code so clean you could eat off it
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
 
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Mark Robinson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-23-2007
Rob S wrote:
> Mark Robinson wrote:
>> SteveM wrote:
>>> Ray Greene <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
>>> news:(E-Mail Removed):
>>>> On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:10:09 +0000 (UTC), SteveM <(E-Mail Removed)>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Ray Greene <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
>>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed):
>>>>>
>>>>>> I have an Acer laptop which has an interesting design feature - the
>>>>>> motherboard has standoffs soldered into it. It's a crappy idea and
>>>>>> some of them have come loose, including the ones which hold the CPU
>>>>>> fan and heatsink.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I'm not comfortable with the idea of trying to solder them back on
>>>>>> so I'm wondering if Loctite or something similar would do the trick.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The part of the standoff which fits in the motherboard is 3mm
>>>>>> diameter and goes in about 1.5mm. The motherboard has a metal insert
>>>>>> and the standoff is a fingertight push fit in it.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Bright ideas anyone, or can you suggest which grade of Loctite to
>>>>>> use?
>>>>>> Incidentally, here's a site with links to a lot of free downloadable
>>>>>> manuals. I found a service manual for the Acer here.
>>>>>> http://www.laptoprepair101.com/lapto...ervice-manual/
>>>>>>
>>>>> Loctite won't last. You need to resolder them on using a hot air
>>>>> soldering
>>>>> unit, (not the normal hot metal tip type). I've done it several times
>>>>> on Acer notebook motherboards.
>>>>>
>>>>> Not sure where you might get access to one; maybe your local Tisco
>>>>> or Next
>>>>> or neighbourhood TV repair shop may be able to help.
>>>> Thanks for the advice Steve. I'm unfamiliar with hot air soldering
>>>> though, what makes it better than a conventional soldering iron for a
>>>> job like this?
>>>>
>>>
>>> Using a normal soldering iron requires you to heat the whole standoff up
>>> to the temp required to melt the solder. This usually causes damage to
>>> the motherboard. Using hot air gives you more control to direct the heat
>>> specifically at the solder and not the standoff itself. With the use of
>>> a little solder flux, you are able to flow the solder around the
>>> standoff a lot faster and with a lower overall heat minimising any
>>> potential damage.
>>> (You do have to be careful not to blow any nearby SMD components off the
>>> board while you're at it though!)

>>
>> I take issue with this.
>>
>> Hot air soldering is more likely to damage the pcb and surrounding
>> components than using a well sized conventional soldering iron when
>> reattaching standoffs.
>>
>> You have to wait a long time for the hot air to heat the standoff up
>> to soldering temperature, meanwhile the hot air is heating up the
>> resin of the pcb and damaging it and damaging the solder joints of
>> surrounding components.
>>
>> For a successful repair ensure that you remove as much as possible of
>> the old solder before resoldering the joint.
>>
>> Adhesives are a poor solution.

>
> Why are adhesives a bad idea? There is no need for a good electrical
> connection, just a good mechanical fix. As long as the standoff is
> fitted in the correct place and not tilted or bent in any direction, a 2
> part resin should do the job nicely. Any heat from the motherboard only
> helps to cure the resin, resulting in a stronger joint.


Heat while the curing is in process helps strengthen the joint. After that it
weakens it. My experience is that solder is stronger than araldite.

It's important that the fan assembly is well earthed or static buildup can zap
the processor/motherboard. Toshiba 1800s are badly prone to this.
 
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