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LCD monitor advice.

 
 
grumpyoldhori
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      03-28-2007

My good wife is looking at buying one of these
19inch lcd monitors at around the $350 price.

She in the main wants it to view videos off
UKnova,Google video etc.

Could I have some advice on which of these
would be most suitable.
Oh,her computer is a one GHZ job,video on
the motherboard,with 512 of memory.
Thanks in advance

http://www.tastech.co.nz/monitors.htm
--
grumpy
 
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Mathew Good
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      03-28-2007
On Wed, 28 Mar 2007 14:40:51 +1200, grumpyoldhori <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
> My good wife is looking at buying one of these
> 19inch lcd monitors at around the $350 price.
>
> She in the main wants it to view videos off
> UKnova,Google video etc.
>
> Could I have some advice on which of these
> would be most suitable.
> Oh,her computer is a one GHZ job,video on
> the motherboard,with 512 of memory.
> Thanks in advance
>
> http://www.tastech.co.nz/monitors.htm




There are normal Very Basic low end LCD Monitors with low Resolutions..

Also I doubt think your computer has a Digital Output so the Pictures will, not be that crisp..


 
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Shane
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      03-28-2007
Sorry grumpy I know sweet FA about LCD monitors. I do however know how to
stop your computers clock from thinking daylight saving is still going.

If you can become the root user of your computer do the following
$ su
Password:
# ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org

If you can use the sudo command instead
$ sudo ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org

There are two options for negating the need to change your clock every time
daylight savings starts or finishes.
Option 1)
tzconfig (aka Timezone configuration)

Option 2)
Instruct your machine to check with time servers what the correct time is,
normally done at boot.
As I recall you use Suse I *think* (without looking it up) the name of the
file is /etc/boot.local
In Debian/Ubuntu/RH its called rc.local

er.. I looked it up and Suse uses /etc/init.d/boot.local

In any case add the ntpdate command to that file using your favourite text
editor eg.

$ sudo kate /etc/init.d/boot.local

add the line
ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org

save and exit.

Alternatively log out of your computer, and login as root (therefore
your 'X' will be roots 'X') and from a command prompt run
# kate /etc/init.d/boot.local

or
Hit the 'K' scroll up the menu to 'Utilities' and on that menu start 'Kate'
From there browse to /etc/init.d and open boot.local


*All* of the above assumes you have ntpdate installed, and a permanent
connection (ie. broadband) to the intarweb.
Your package manager (Yast?) is the first port of call if the former
HTH


 
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Chris Hope
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      03-28-2007
Shane wrote:

> Sorry grumpy I know sweet FA about LCD monitors. I do however know
> how to stop your computers clock from thinking daylight saving is
> still going.
>
> If you can become the root user of your computer do the following
> $ su
> Password:
> # ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org
>
> If you can use the sudo command instead
> $ sudo ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org
>
> There are two options for negating the need to change your clock every
> time daylight savings starts or finishes.
> Option 1)
> tzconfig (aka Timezone configuration)
>
> Option 2)
> Instruct your machine to check with time servers what the correct time
> is, normally done at boot.
> As I recall you use Suse I *think* (without looking it up) the name of
> the file is /etc/boot.local
> In Debian/Ubuntu/RH its called rc.local
>
> er.. I looked it up and Suse uses /etc/init.d/boot.local
>
> In any case add the ntpdate command to that file using your favourite
> text editor eg.
>
> $ sudo kate /etc/init.d/boot.local
>
> add the line
> ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org
>
> save and exit.
>
> Alternatively log out of your computer, and login as root (therefore
> your 'X' will be roots 'X') and from a command prompt run
> # kate /etc/init.d/boot.local
>
> or
> Hit the 'K' scroll up the menu to 'Utilities' and on that menu start
> 'Kate' From there browse to /etc/init.d and open boot.local
>
>
> *All* of the above assumes you have ntpdate installed, and a permanent
> connection (ie. broadband) to the intarweb.
> Your package manager (Yast?) is the first port of call if the former
> HTH


You can set the NTP configuration using Yast, ie you don't need to do
any of the command line stuff / edit text files. Fire up Yast, then
select "Network Services" and then "NTP Configuration".

--
Chris Hope | www.electrictoolbox.com | www.linuxcdmall.com
 
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Chris Hope
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-28-2007
Chris Hope wrote:

> Shane wrote:
>
>> Sorry grumpy I know sweet FA about LCD monitors. I do however know
>> how to stop your computers clock from thinking daylight saving is
>> still going.
>>
>> If you can become the root user of your computer do the following
>> $ su
>> Password:
>> # ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org
>>
>> If you can use the sudo command instead
>> $ sudo ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org
>>
>> There are two options for negating the need to change your clock
>> every time daylight savings starts or finishes.
>> Option 1)
>> tzconfig (aka Timezone configuration)
>>
>> Option 2)
>> Instruct your machine to check with time servers what the correct
>> time is, normally done at boot.
>> As I recall you use Suse I *think* (without looking it up) the name
>> of the file is /etc/boot.local
>> In Debian/Ubuntu/RH its called rc.local
>>
>> er.. I looked it up and Suse uses /etc/init.d/boot.local
>>
>> In any case add the ntpdate command to that file using your favourite
>> text editor eg.
>>
>> $ sudo kate /etc/init.d/boot.local
>>
>> add the line
>> ntpdate nz.pool.ntp.org
>>
>> save and exit.
>>
>> Alternatively log out of your computer, and login as root (therefore
>> your 'X' will be roots 'X') and from a command prompt run
>> # kate /etc/init.d/boot.local
>>
>> or
>> Hit the 'K' scroll up the menu to 'Utilities' and on that menu start
>> 'Kate' From there browse to /etc/init.d and open boot.local
>>
>>
>> *All* of the above assumes you have ntpdate installed, and a
>> permanent connection (ie. broadband) to the intarweb.
>> Your package manager (Yast?) is the first port of call if the former
>> HTH

>
> You can set the NTP configuration using Yast, ie you don't need to do
> any of the command line stuff / edit text files. Fire up Yast, then
> select "Network Services" and then "NTP Configuration".


Assuming you're using SUSE, of course

--
Chris Hope | www.electrictoolbox.com | www.linuxcdmall.com
 
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Shane
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-28-2007
Chris Hope wrote:

> Chris Hope wrote:


>> You can set the NTP configuration using Yast, ie you don't need to do
>> any of the command line stuff / edit text files. Fire up Yast, then
>> select "Network Services" and then "NTP Configuration".

>
> Assuming you're using SUSE, of course
>


Bah.. far too easy.. how will *that* grow hairs on his chest???

 
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grumpyoldhori
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      03-28-2007
Shane wrote:

> Sorry grumpy I know sweet FA about LCD monitors. I do however know how to
> stop your computers clock from thinking daylight saving is still going.
>


Thanks Shane,worked like a charm with kate,vi is
just too much hard work for we in our late,late
thirties.
--
grumpy
 
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grumpyoldhori
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      03-28-2007
Chris Hope wrote:

> Assuming you're using SUSE, of course
>

Still using suse 10,gave up the battle to get the
wireless card going on 10.2
--
grumpy
 
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XPD
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-28-2007

"grumpyoldhori" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:eucg4h$tpd$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> My good wife is looking at buying one of these
> 19inch lcd monitors at around the $350 price.
>
> She in the main wants it to view videos off
> UKnova,Google video etc.
>
> Could I have some advice on which of these
> would be most suitable.
> Oh,her computer is a one GHZ job,video on
> the motherboard,with 512 of memory.
> Thanks in advance


CMV are fine for the price, used to sell quite a few and probably 2% ever
came back with issues (which were promptly resolved).
Viewsonics are nice monitors as well.....

TBH most LCDs these days are good for joe average. For daily use, there is
no real difference between analog and DVI.


 
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Chris Hope
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      03-28-2007
grumpyoldhori wrote:

> Chris Hope wrote:
>
>> Assuming you're using SUSE, of course
>>

> Still using suse 10,gave up the battle to get the
> wireless card going on 10.2


Yeah it's funny how some hardware that worked beautifully on older
versions of a particular distro stops working in later versions. I had
a customer with Fedora Core 5 and it worked fine but it wasn't possible
to install FC6. He had a dual processor motherboard but with only one
processor and for some reason FC6 refused to install on it, apparantly
due to this processor configuration.

--
Chris Hope | www.electrictoolbox.com | www.linuxcdmall.com
 
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