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ADSL2

 
 
Shane
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-04-2007
http://www.stuff.co.nz//3949271a28.html

If you're like me and stuff takes eons to load (if at all) then heres the
entire text:

Superfast broadband in March

Telecom will launch superfast ADSL2+ broadband in New Zealand next month,
nine months later than it first intended. Tom Pullar-Strecker reports.

Spokeswoman Melanie Marshall says the first ADSL2+ phone exchange will go
live in March. Telecom will meet with wholesale customers this week to
consult them on where and when it should roll out the technology after
that.

ADSL2+ promises to let people download information from the internet up to
three times faster than they can today. However, only about half of
broadband subscribers are likely to benefit, as customers need to be no
more than four kilometres from an ADSL2+-enabled telephone exchange to see
an improvement.

Telecom announced last April that it had placed an initial order worth $150
million to $170 million for ADSL2+ access and Ethernet backhaul equipment
with French contractor Alcatel. It intended to begin trialling the
technology within three months.

Alcatel's Asia Pacific chief technology officer, Ric Clark, said then that
customers within 1½ kilometres of an exchange could have download speeds of
12 megabits a second.

The practical benefit of ADSL2+ is that it will let Telecom and its
wholesale customers stream TV-quality video over the internet in real-time,
paving the way for possible convergence of the television broadcasting and
the telecommunications industries.

Telecom's general manager of video services, Philip King, says by the end of
the year testing should begin of set-top boxes that will let customers
watch programmes broadcast by Freeview over its digital terrestrial
television network or downloaded over the internet via ADSL2+.

The boxes should go on sale during the first half of next year.

Telecom is talking to content companies to explore new services that could
be brought to market.

It is still investigating which of a range of rival IPTV platforms it will
use.

France Telecom recently entered the movie business, setting up a company to
be involved in producing French and European movies. It will acquire rights
to films.

Mr King doubts Telecom will become as involved in creating content and says
partnering with players such as Sky TV is more likely.

"We have to be careful in a market of four million people.

"The economics of a country like France are different and they have specific
language issues which we don't have."

Moves by Freeview to put ADSL2+-enabled set-top boxes into homes has pitched
the free-to-air consortium into direct competition with Sky, which also
plans to launch its own net-connected set-top boxes early in 2008.
 
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whome
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-04-2007

"Shane" <(E-Mail Removed)-a-geek.net> wrote in message
news:eq5ca0$cip$(E-Mail Removed)...
> http://www.stuff.co.nz//3949271a28.html
>
> If you're like me and stuff takes eons to load (if at all) then heres the
> entire text:
>
> Superfast broadband in March
>
> Telecom will launch superfast ADSL2+ broadband in New Zealand next month,
> nine months later than it first intended. Tom Pullar-Strecker reports.
>



Now, my broadband is currently FS/FS meaning I should in theory get up to
6mbps or around there.

However, I only get 2mbps cos of contention ratios. It occasionally goes up
to 4mbps but very rarely.

So, who cares if the max limit is raised? I cannot even reach the existing
maximum limit so won't the same factors stop me reaching the max under
ADSL2+? ie, if the backend is only capable of delivering 2mbps on average
then increasing the speed between me and the exchange won't help a jot.





 
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Zipper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-04-2007
Shane wrote:
> http://www.stuff.co.nz//3949271a28.html
>
> If you're like me and stuff takes eons to load (if at all) then heres the
> entire text:


It should have been vdsl2...


>
> Superfast broadband in March
>
> Telecom will launch superfast ADSL2+ broadband in New Zealand next month,
> nine months later than it first intended. Tom Pullar-Strecker reports.
>
> Spokeswoman Melanie Marshall says the first ADSL2+ phone exchange will go
> live in March. Telecom will meet with wholesale customers this week to
> consult them on where and when it should roll out the technology after
> that.
>
> ADSL2+ promises to let people download information from the internet up to
> three times faster than they can today. However, only about half of
> broadband subscribers are likely to benefit, as customers need to be no
> more than four kilometres from an ADSL2+-enabled telephone exchange to see
> an improvement.
>
> Telecom announced last April that it had placed an initial order worth $150
> million to $170 million for ADSL2+ access and Ethernet backhaul equipment
> with French contractor Alcatel. It intended to begin trialling the
> technology within three months.
>
> Alcatel's Asia Pacific chief technology officer, Ric Clark, said then that
> customers within 1½ kilometres of an exchange could have download speeds of
> 12 megabits a second.
>
> The practical benefit of ADSL2+ is that it will let Telecom and its
> wholesale customers stream TV-quality video over the internet in real-time,
> paving the way for possible convergence of the television broadcasting and
> the telecommunications industries.
>
> Telecom's general manager of video services, Philip King, says by the end of
> the year testing should begin of set-top boxes that will let customers
> watch programmes broadcast by Freeview over its digital terrestrial
> television network or downloaded over the internet via ADSL2+.
>
> The boxes should go on sale during the first half of next year.
>
> Telecom is talking to content companies to explore new services that could
> be brought to market.
>
> It is still investigating which of a range of rival IPTV platforms it will
> use.
>
> France Telecom recently entered the movie business, setting up a company to
> be involved in producing French and European movies. It will acquire rights
> to films.
>
> Mr King doubts Telecom will become as involved in creating content and says
> partnering with players such as Sky TV is more likely.
>
> "We have to be careful in a market of four million people.
>
> "The economics of a country like France are different and they have specific
> language issues which we don't have."
>
> Moves by Freeview to put ADSL2+-enabled set-top boxes into homes has pitched
> the free-to-air consortium into direct competition with Sky, which also
> plans to launch its own net-connected set-top boxes early in 2008.

 
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The Other Guy
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-05-2007
Shane wrote:
> Telecom's general manager of video services, Philip King, says by the end of
> the year testing should begin of set-top boxes that will let customers
> watch programmes broadcast by Freeview over its digital terrestrial
> television network or downloaded over the internet via ADSL2+.
>
> The boxes should go on sale during the first half of next year.


I doubt that IPTV is going to be a serious contender here. First of all,
FreeView will launch this year via DVB-S, and the rollout of DVB-T will
commence next year. Do we really need a third delivery mechanism for the
same programming?

It is DVB-T you will find built in to your new television, not IPTV, and
probably not DVB-S (although there are some with both).

The Internet might offer some enhanced features, like Video on Demand,
but it will also offer more snooping by content providers to see what
you really do watch. Long term, think targeted advertising and your
information being sold to third parties.

My biggest concern with this technology is the **** state of Telecom
copper. They can't keep my ADSL connection up for more than a few days,
and outages of many hours are not uncommon. What do people do when they
can't get on the Internet? Watch television? Won't be able to if they
rely on this technology. The birth rate will go up every time Telecom
has an outage.

As it is, I don't watch movies on Sky Boxoffice because it costs too
much, and I'm sure the convenience of being able to watch a movie on
demand will come at a similar stupidly inflated price.

I don't want my media merged in to one box. The PC is for Internet
access, not the television.


The Other Guy
 
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GraB
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-05-2007
On Mon, 05 Feb 2007 09:58:40 +1300, Zipper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Shane wrote:
>> http://www.stuff.co.nz//3949271a28.html
>>
>> If you're like me and stuff takes eons to load (if at all) then heres the
>> entire text:

>
>It should have been vdsl2...
>

That would make more sense.


 
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GraB
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-05-2007
On Mon, 05 Feb 2007 08:32:49 +1300, Shane <(E-Mail Removed)-a-geek.net>
wrote:

>http://www.stuff.co.nz//3949271a28.html
>
>If you're like me and stuff takes eons to load (if at all) then heres the
>entire text:
>
>Superfast broadband in March
>
>Telecom will launch superfast ADSL2+ broadband in New Zealand next month,
>nine months later than it first intended. Tom Pullar-Strecker reports.
>
>Spokeswoman Melanie Marshall says the first ADSL2+ phone exchange will go
>live in March. Telecom will meet with wholesale customers this week to
>consult them on where and when it should roll out the technology after
>that.
>
>ADSL2+ promises to let people download information from the internet up to
>three times faster than they can today. However, only about half of
>broadband subscribers are likely to benefit, as customers need to be no
>more than four kilometres from an ADSL2+-enabled telephone exchange to see
>an improvement.
>
>Telecom announced last April that it had placed an initial order worth $150
>million to $170 million for ADSL2+ access and Ethernet backhaul equipment
>with French contractor Alcatel. It intended to begin trialling the
>technology within three months.
>
>Alcatel's Asia Pacific chief technology officer, Ric Clark, said then that
>customers within 1½ kilometres of an exchange could have download speeds of
>12 megabits a second.
>
>The practical benefit of ADSL2+ is that it will let Telecom and its
>wholesale customers stream TV-quality video over the internet in real-time,
>paving the way for possible convergence of the television broadcasting and
>the telecommunications industries.
>
>Telecom's general manager of video services, Philip King, says by the end of
>the year testing should begin of set-top boxes that will let customers
>watch programmes broadcast by Freeview over its digital terrestrial
>television network or downloaded over the internet via ADSL2+.
>
>The boxes should go on sale during the first half of next year.
>
>Telecom is talking to content companies to explore new services that could
>be brought to market.
>
>It is still investigating which of a range of rival IPTV platforms it will
>use.
>
>France Telecom recently entered the movie business, setting up a company to
>be involved in producing French and European movies. It will acquire rights
>to films.
>
>Mr King doubts Telecom will become as involved in creating content and says
>partnering with players such as Sky TV is more likely.
>
>"We have to be careful in a market of four million people.
>
>"The economics of a country like France are different and they have specific
>language issues which we don't have."
>
>Moves by Freeview to put ADSL2+-enabled set-top boxes into homes has pitched
>the free-to-air consortium into direct competition with Sky, which also
>plans to launch its own net-connected set-top boxes early in 2008.


They are going to have to free up existing data caps enormously if
they are thinking about streaming movies and TV.


 
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Zipper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-05-2007
The Other Guy wrote:
> Shane wrote:
>> Telecom's general manager of video services, Philip King, says by the
>> end of
>> the year testing should begin of set-top boxes that will let customers
>> watch programmes broadcast by Freeview over its digital terrestrial
>> television network or downloaded over the internet via ADSL2+.
>>
>> The boxes should go on sale during the first half of next year.

>
> I doubt that IPTV is going to be a serious contender here. First of all,
> FreeView will launch this year via DVB-S, and the rollout of DVB-T will
> commence next year. Do we really need a third delivery mechanism for the
> same programming?
>
> It is DVB-T you will find built in to your new television, not IPTV, and
> probably not DVB-S (although there are some with both).
>
> The Internet might offer some enhanced features, like Video on Demand,
> but it will also offer more snooping by content providers to see what
> you really do watch. Long term, think targeted advertising


Is that really an issue? I would rather have advertising that is
relative to me than watching vaginal thrush commercials or tampon
commercials etc .

and your
> information being sold to third parties.
>
> My biggest concern with this technology is the **** state of Telecom
> copper. They can't keep my ADSL connection up for more than a few days,
> and outages of many hours are not uncommon. What do people do when they
> can't get on the Internet? Watch television? Won't be able to if they
> rely on this technology. The birth rate will go up every time Telecom
> has an outage.


Yes the state of the copper is questionable and its future.

>
> As it is, I don't watch movies on Sky Boxoffice because it costs too
> much, and I'm sure the convenience of being able to watch a movie on
> demand will come at a similar stupidly inflated price.
>
> I don't want my media merged in to one box. The PC is for Internet
> access, not the television.
>
>
> The Other Guy

 
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Earl Grey
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-05-2007
Blue wrote:
> On Mon, 05 Feb 2007 09:10:43 +1300, whome wrote:
>
>> "Shane" <(E-Mail Removed)-a-geek.net> wrote in message
>> news:eq5ca0$cip$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> http://www.stuff.co.nz//3949271a28.html
>>>
>>> If you're like me and stuff takes eons to load (if at all) then heres the
>>> entire text:
>>>
>>> Superfast broadband in March
>>>
>>> Telecom will launch superfast ADSL2+ broadband in New Zealand next month,
>>> nine months later than it first intended. Tom Pullar-Strecker reports.
>>>

>>
>> Now, my broadband is currently FS/FS meaning I should in theory get up to
>> 6mbps or around there.
>>
>> However, I only get 2mbps cos of contention ratios. It occasionally goes up
>> to 4mbps but very rarely.
>>
>> So, who cares if the max limit is raised? I cannot even reach the existing
>> maximum limit so won't the same factors stop me reaching the max under
>> ADSL2+? ie, if the backend is only capable of delivering 2mbps on average
>> then increasing the speed between me and the exchange won't help a jot.

>
> Yep. Telcom can not get ADSL1 going properly so they spin in ADSL2 and
> then say that they are having teething troubles.
>

The ADSL bit works fine, the backhaul network is the problem
 
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Collector»NZ
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-05-2007
GraB wrote:
> On Mon, 05 Feb 2007 08:32:49 +1300, Shane <(E-Mail Removed)-a-geek.net>
> wrote:
>
>> http://www.stuff.co.nz//3949271a28.html
>>

Snipped
>>
>> Moves by Freeview to put ADSL2+-enabled set-top boxes into homes has pitched
>> the free-to-air consortium into direct competition with Sky, which also
>> plans to launch its own net-connected set-top boxes early in 2008.

>
> They are going to have to free up existing data caps enormously if
> they are thinking about streaming movies and TV.
>
>

Heck no way will they do that they want to make another $ or two of the poor
sucker consumer before they even think about reasonable caps

--
>>Follow ups may be set to a single group when appropriate!

================================================== ====================
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El Chippy
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-05-2007
On Mon, 05 Feb 2007 15:31:36 +1300, GraB wrote:

> On Mon, 05 Feb 2007 09:58:40 +1300, Zipper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>Shane wrote:
>>> http://www.stuff.co.nz//3949271a28.html
>>>
>>> If you're like me and stuff takes eons to load (if at all) then heres the
>>> entire text:

>>
>>It should have been vdsl2...
>>

> That would make more sense.


And that would have cost telecom a lot more money.. half their existing
equipment is ADSL2 capable judging by the literature i have seen. VDSL2
would have meant replacing most(all?) of the existing dslams.
 
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