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Freeview + Telecom? iptv

 
 
Craig Sutton
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-27-2006
TV next Telecom battle




From The Indepdendent


TELECOM is to piggyback on the advent of Freeview digital television
to launch its own hybrid set-top box that it hopes will become the
single gateway householders use to watch, record, download and play
television and movies.

The decision by New Zealand's biggest listed company to throw its
marketing and financial weight behind Freeview while it's still in
its infancy will provide a major boost for the platform, which free
to air broadcasters such as TVNZ and TV3 hope will provide real
competition for Sky TV.

Telecom's decision to go down the hybrid television route rather than
via a pure internet protocol television (IPTV) path also signals its
reluctance to invest too heavily in widespread, high-bandwith
broadband connections given the uncertainty over government
regulation.

Telecom's general manager of video services, Philip King, said the
economics of pure IPTV did not stack up given the uncertainty of the
regulatory environment and the likely revenues from IPTV alone.

Telecom had looked at IPTV in previous years and had decided again
this year that it could not be done profitably given the hundreds of
millions of dollars needed to upgrade and extend the underlying
broadband network.

Telecom was now in early discussions with Freeview and both the free-
to-air broadcasters about how to launch its hybrid boxes. It is also
investigating what tools it can add to the boxes to help viewers
download "catch-up" TV or movies using the connection the boxes will
have to a home's copper wire broadband connection, King said.

"We can be quite helpful to them (the broadcasters behind Freeview)
in giving Freeview the momentum to get going," King told The
Independent Financial Review.

He described the negotiations as "complex but friendly."

Telecom would use its marketing muscle through its extensive network
of shops and its installation resources to help roll out Freeview.
Telecom is the country's biggest advertiser.

Until now, a small Freeview organisation has had to plan to take on
the might of Sky's resources on its own, including the task of
deciding on set top boxes and planning installation systems.

A Telecom set top box would include a personal video recorder (PVR)
and the ability to download regular programmes or movies via the
broadband phone line connection.

These could be paid for through subscriptions or pay per view, with a
revenue share potentially going to the programme provider.

Telecom is pitching the box as a useful set of tools on top of a
regular digital television receiver that helps Freeview compete with
the likes of SkyTV's MySky.

The hybrid boxes could even be subsidised, helping to extend the
penetration of the boxes. The simple TV next Telecom battle Freeview
boxes being proposed by TVNZ and TV3 were expected to cost several
hundred dollars to buy and install. "It's (subsidising boxes) with in
the realms of possibility. It's possible for high-value customers
that you would want to encourage them on to that service," King said.

Sky also offers subsidised set top boxes and installation to
encourage viewers to sign up for its services. It now has more than
667,000 households, or more than 42% of the market, signed up for its
services.

King said Telecom had no plans to get into the business of buying and
producing content such as sports or entertainment programming, but
would not rule it out long term.

Asked if Telecom would bid against Sky for rights to broadcast All
Black and Super 14 matches when they come up for renewal in 2010,
King said Telecom preferred to focus on delivering the added extras
through the box rather than generating the pure content.

"We're not ourselves in the content game. We're looking to work in
partnership with the industry."

This included the option of offering a different hybrid box that
allowed householders to receive satellite channels from Sky and to
download movies and programmes via broadband.

Telecom began work on its television plan in April and now has a team
of 10 building the proposal.

King said he was recruiting another half a dozen people to lead the
launch by the whole company in the first half of 2008. Telecom would
tender for the software and hardware used in the boxes in the first
quarter of next year.

Telecom's move into television comes as it hunts for new revenue
opportunities to compensate for pressure on revenues and margins as
the government re-regulates the sector.




 
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JohnO
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-27-2006

Craig Sutton wrote:
> TV next Telecom battle
>
>
>
>
> From The Indepdendent
>
>
> TELECOM is to piggyback on the advent of Freeview digital television
> to launch its own hybrid set-top box that it hopes will become the
> single gateway householders use to watch, record, download and play
> television and movies.
>
> The decision by New Zealand's biggest listed company to throw its
> marketing and financial weight behind Freeview while it's still in
> its infancy will provide a major boost for the platform, which free
> to air broadcasters such as TVNZ and TV3 hope will provide real
> competition for Sky TV.
>
> Telecom's decision to go down the hybrid television route rather than
> via a pure internet protocol television (IPTV) path also signals its
> reluctance to invest too heavily in widespread, high-bandwith
> broadband connections given the uncertainty over government
> regulation.
>
> Telecom's general manager of video services, Philip King, said the
> economics of pure IPTV did not stack up given the uncertainty of the
> regulatory environment and the likely revenues from IPTV alone.
>
> Telecom had looked at IPTV in previous years and had decided again
> this year that it could not be done profitably given the hundreds of
> millions of dollars needed to upgrade and extend the underlying
> broadband network.
>
> Telecom was now in early discussions with Freeview and both the free-
> to-air broadcasters about how to launch its hybrid boxes. It is also
> investigating what tools it can add to the boxes to help viewers
> download "catch-up" TV or movies using the connection the boxes will
> have to a home's copper wire broadband connection, King said.
>
> "We can be quite helpful to them (the broadcasters behind Freeview)
> in giving Freeview the momentum to get going," King told The
> Independent Financial Review.
>
> He described the negotiations as "complex but friendly."
>
> Telecom would use its marketing muscle through its extensive network
> of shops and its installation resources to help roll out Freeview.
> Telecom is the country's biggest advertiser.
>
> Until now, a small Freeview organisation has had to plan to take on
> the might of Sky's resources on its own, including the task of
> deciding on set top boxes and planning installation systems.
>
> A Telecom set top box would include a personal video recorder (PVR)
> and the ability to download regular programmes or movies via the
> broadband phone line connection.
>
> These could be paid for through subscriptions or pay per view, with a
> revenue share potentially going to the programme provider.
>
> Telecom is pitching the box as a useful set of tools on top of a
> regular digital television receiver that helps Freeview compete with
> the likes of SkyTV's MySky.
>
> The hybrid boxes could even be subsidised, helping to extend the
> penetration of the boxes. The simple TV next Telecom battle Freeview
> boxes being proposed by TVNZ and TV3 were expected to cost several
> hundred dollars to buy and install. "It's (subsidising boxes) with in
> the realms of possibility. It's possible for high-value customers
> that you would want to encourage them on to that service," King said.
>
> Sky also offers subsidised set top boxes and installation to
> encourage viewers to sign up for its services. It now has more than
> 667,000 households, or more than 42% of the market, signed up for its
> services.
>
> King said Telecom had no plans to get into the business of buying and
> producing content such as sports or entertainment programming, but
> would not rule it out long term.
>
> Asked if Telecom would bid against Sky for rights to broadcast All
> Black and Super 14 matches when they come up for renewal in 2010,
> King said Telecom preferred to focus on delivering the added extras
> through the box rather than generating the pure content.
>
> "We're not ourselves in the content game. We're looking to work in
> partnership with the industry."
>
> This included the option of offering a different hybrid box that
> allowed householders to receive satellite channels from Sky and to
> download movies and programmes via broadband.
>
> Telecom began work on its television plan in April and now has a team
> of 10 building the proposal.
>
> King said he was recruiting another half a dozen people to lead the
> launch by the whole company in the first half of 2008. Telecom would
> tender for the software and hardware used in the boxes in the first
> quarter of next year.
>
> Telecom's move into television comes as it hunts for new revenue
> opportunities to compensate for pressure on revenues and margins as
> the government re-regulates the sector.


Presumably just a small percentage of the population watching iptv will
be enough to bring ADSL to it's knees?

 
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Zipper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-27-2006
Craig Sutton wrote:
> TV next Telecom battle
>
>
>
>
> From The Indepdendent
>
>
> TELECOM is to piggyback on the advent of Freeview digital television
> to launch its own hybrid set-top box that it hopes will become the
> single gateway householders use to watch, record, download and play
> television and movies.
>
> The decision by New Zealand's biggest listed company to throw its
> marketing and financial weight behind Freeview while it's still in
> its infancy will provide a major boost for the platform, which free
> to air broadcasters such as TVNZ and TV3 hope will provide real
> competition for Sky TV.
>
> Telecom's decision to go down the hybrid television route rather than
> via a pure internet protocol television (IPTV) path also signals its
> reluctance to invest too heavily in widespread, high-bandwith
> broadband connections given the uncertainty over government
> regulation.
>
> Telecom's general manager of video services, Philip King, said the
> economics of pure IPTV did not stack up given the uncertainty of the
> regulatory environment and the likely revenues from IPTV alone.
>
> Telecom had looked at IPTV in previous years and had decided again
> this year that it could not be done profitably given the hundreds of
> millions of dollars needed to upgrade and extend the underlying
> broadband network.
>
> Telecom was now in early discussions with Freeview and both the free-
> to-air broadcasters about how to launch its hybrid boxes. It is also
> investigating what tools it can add to the boxes to help viewers
> download "catch-up" TV or movies using the connection the boxes will
> have to a home's copper wire broadband connection, King said.
>
> "We can be quite helpful to them (the broadcasters behind Freeview)
> in giving Freeview the momentum to get going," King told The
> Independent Financial Review.
>
> He described the negotiations as "complex but friendly."
>
> Telecom would use its marketing muscle through its extensive network
> of shops and its installation resources to help roll out Freeview.
> Telecom is the country's biggest advertiser.
>
> Until now, a small Freeview organisation has had to plan to take on
> the might of Sky's resources on its own, including the task of
> deciding on set top boxes and planning installation systems.
>
> A Telecom set top box would include a personal video recorder (PVR)
> and the ability to download regular programmes or movies via the
> broadband phone line connection.
>
> These could be paid for through subscriptions or pay per view, with a
> revenue share potentially going to the programme provider.
>
> Telecom is pitching the box as a useful set of tools on top of a
> regular digital television receiver that helps Freeview compete with
> the likes of SkyTV's MySky.
>
> The hybrid boxes could even be subsidised, helping to extend the
> penetration of the boxes. The simple TV next Telecom battle Freeview
> boxes being proposed by TVNZ and TV3 were expected to cost several
> hundred dollars to buy and install. "It's (subsidising boxes) with in
> the realms of possibility. It's possible for high-value customers
> that you would want to encourage them on to that service," King said.
>
> Sky also offers subsidised set top boxes and installation to
> encourage viewers to sign up for its services. It now has more than
> 667,000 households, or more than 42% of the market, signed up for its
> services.
>
> King said Telecom had no plans to get into the business of buying and
> producing content such as sports or entertainment programming, but
> would not rule it out long term.
>
> Asked if Telecom would bid against Sky for rights to broadcast All
> Black and Super 14 matches when they come up for renewal in 2010,
> King said Telecom preferred to focus on delivering the added extras
> through the box rather than generating the pure content.
>
> "We're not ourselves in the content game. We're looking to work in
> partnership with the industry."
>
> This included the option of offering a different hybrid box that
> allowed householders to receive satellite channels from Sky and to
> download movies and programmes via broadband.
>
> Telecom began work on its television plan in April and now has a team
> of 10 building the proposal.
>
> King said he was recruiting another half a dozen people to lead the
> launch by the whole company in the first half of 2008. Telecom would
> tender for the software and hardware used in the boxes in the first
> quarter of next year.
>
> Telecom's move into television comes as it hunts for new revenue
> opportunities to compensate for pressure on revenues and margins as
> the government re-regulates the sector.
>
>
>
>


This is what Orcon want to roll out next year along with vdsl2.
It is interesting that Telecom don't trust their own network enough to
want to try it, kind of says a lot about the current state of things
really..
 
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Craig Sutton
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-28-2006

"Zipper" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:(E-Mail Removed)...

>
> This is what Orcon want to roll out next year along with vdsl2.
> It is interesting that Telecom don't trust their own network enough to
> want to try it, kind of says a lot about the current state of things
> really..


You need a minimum of a constant 2.5 mbitt to do SDTV over iptv. I expect
what they will offer is the ability to download shows rather than stream
them.


 
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Kent Smith
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-28-2006

"Craig Sutton" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:ekg9t7$ten$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "Zipper" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>>
>> This is what Orcon want to roll out next year along with vdsl2.
>> It is interesting that Telecom don't trust their own network enough to
>> want to try it, kind of says a lot about the current state of things
>> really..

>
> You need a minimum of a constant 2.5 mbitt to do SDTV over iptv. I expect
> what they will offer is the ability to download shows rather than stream
> them.
>

My guess is live multicasting - i.e a 20 min show is scheduled to play every
30 mins but to multiple computers because it only has to be sent once - much
more efficient than unicasting on demand where it's sent each time it's
requested. Of course there's some good peer to peer stuff out there now
too.


-KENT


 
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Steven Ellis
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-28-2006

Craig Sutton wrote:
> "Zipper" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> >
> > This is what Orcon want to roll out next year along with vdsl2.
> > It is interesting that Telecom don't trust their own network enough to
> > want to try it, kind of says a lot about the current state of things
> > really..

>
> You need a minimum of a constant 2.5 mbitt to do SDTV over iptv. I expect
> what they will offer is the ability to download shows rather than stream
> them.


Not if you are using MPEG4, you can get get this down to under 1 mbit.

Also depends how much control you have over the pipe. If you can
multicast atleast as far as the head, and then only provide the IPTV
feed down the ADSL connection that the customer has requested you can
offer a lot of channels.

Steve

 
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E. Scrooge
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-29-2006

"Craig Sutton" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:ekg9t7$ten$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "Zipper" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>>
>> This is what Orcon want to roll out next year along with vdsl2.
>> It is interesting that Telecom don't trust their own network enough to
>> want to try it, kind of says a lot about the current state of things
>> really..

>
> You need a minimum of a constant 2.5 mbitt to do SDTV over iptv. I expect
> what they will offer is the ability to download shows rather than stream
> them.


You don't think it would take a lot more than 1,000 (and that's being
generous) people to make it worthwhile?

Some people are quick to forget about ihug's failure as a TV broadcaster.

And the public take up of faster internet over dial up can't be all that
great either.

A good example is that out of 4 million people in the country - perhaps
almost a million online - that **** all people bother to take part in the NZ
newsgroups.
A real good indication that people have individual needs and aren't likely
to give up long established services for anything that they don't need just
for the sake of having it.

E. Scrooge


 
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Dave Taylor
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-29-2006
Mathew Good <(E-Mail Removed) wrote in
news:(E-Mail Removed):

> Does the Netguide even mention it..?


Does the netguide ever get technical?

--
Ciao, Dave
 
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Craig Sutton
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-29-2006

"E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
news:1164777517.530062@ftpsrv1...
>
> "Craig Sutton" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:ekg9t7$ten$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>
>> "Zipper" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>
>>>
>>> This is what Orcon want to roll out next year along with vdsl2.
>>> It is interesting that Telecom don't trust their own network enough to
>>> want to try it, kind of says a lot about the current state of things
>>> really..

>>
>> You need a minimum of a constant 2.5 mbitt to do SDTV over iptv. I expect
>> what they will offer is the ability to download shows rather than stream
>> them.

>
> You don't think it would take a lot more than 1,000 (and that's being
> generous) people to make it worthwhile?
>
>

Where are you pulling that figure 1000 people what? Telecom has been
trialing abox with Sky. Its no secret. Not sure if I like the idea though of
Telecom being involved.

For it work they really would need to make local internet traffic free along
with giving a minimum level of service. It would be no good watching some
rugby game and then having the pic buffer or dropout..



 
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Steven Ellis
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-29-2006

Craig Sutton wrote:
> "E. Scrooge" <scrooge@*shot.co.nz (*sling)> wrote in message
> news:1164777517.530062@ftpsrv1...
> >
> > "Craig Sutton" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:ekg9t7$ten$(E-Mail Removed)...
> >>
> >> "Zipper" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >>
> >>>
> >>> This is what Orcon want to roll out next year along with vdsl2.
> >>> It is interesting that Telecom don't trust their own network enough to
> >>> want to try it, kind of says a lot about the current state of things
> >>> really..
> >>
> >> You need a minimum of a constant 2.5 mbitt to do SDTV over iptv. I expect
> >> what they will offer is the ability to download shows rather than stream
> >> them.

> >
> > You don't think it would take a lot more than 1,000 (and that's being
> > generous) people to make it worthwhile?
> >
> >

> Where are you pulling that figure 1000 people what? Telecom has been
> trialing abox with Sky. Its no secret. Not sure if I like the idea though of
> Telecom being involved.


I agree. Bad enough what Sky can get off their boxes if you have a
modem connection without Telecom monitoring everything you watch over
broadband. Just imaging the targetted advertising they could do.

> For it work they really would need to make local internet traffic free along
> with giving a minimum level of service. It would be no good watching some
> rugby game and then having the pic buffer or dropout..


Seperate channel over the ADSL from your normal internet connection.
There have been services in HK and other places doing this. They
muticast the channels to the head/DSLAM and unicast down your ADSL
connection from there. Removes all of the contention issues as the pipe
from your house to the DSLAM is dedicated. Its just the backhaul that
is congested.

Steve

 
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