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Faster Hard Drives?

 
 
Chris Lim
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      07-03-2006
Where are all the faster hard drives? They seem to be getting bigger
and bigger but not a lot faster.

Given that they are the bottleneck in most systems, I would've thought
that some progress would've been made in this area by now. Is this
anything in the pipeline? I hate the fact that a top end Pentium with
an IDE or SATA drive still takes around the same time to boot as a
budget Celeron!

 
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thingy
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      07-03-2006
Chris Lim wrote:
> Where are all the faster hard drives? They seem to be getting bigger
> and bigger but not a lot faster.
>
> Given that they are the bottleneck in most systems, I would've thought
> that some progress would've been made in this area by now. Is this
> anything in the pipeline? I hate the fact that a top end Pentium with
> an IDE or SATA drive still takes around the same time to boot as a
> budget Celeron!
>


The Raptor sata drives are really scsi drives with a sata interface, so
the fastest you can get, but they have small capacity, high heat and
very high prices.

Otherwise no, you are reading off a mechanical device it has
limitations. You can get solid state disks which are very fast, and
about 8 gig of so, but these are not cheap.....

regards

thing
 
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Nathan Mercer
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      07-03-2006
Chris Lim wrote:
> Where are all the faster hard drives? They seem to be getting bigger
> and bigger but not a lot faster.
>
> Given that they are the bottleneck in most systems, I would've thought
> that some progress would've been made in this area by now. Is this
> anything in the pipeline? I hate the fact that a top end Pentium with
> an IDE or SATA drive still takes around the same time to boot as a
> budget Celeron!


FWIW Windows Vista includes several technologies that are specifically
designed to improve perf off the HDD, plug in a fast USB2 FD and gain
some perf, or buy a new HDD that includes some Flash on it (Hybrid
HDDs). Also the motherboard manufacturers are working on building some
Flash into mobo's coming out next year too

http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/system...celerator.mspx

Windows ReadyBoost-capable Flash Devices
The use of a flash device that supports Windows ReadyBoost technology
extends the disk caching capabilities of Windows Vista main memory.
ReadyBoost-capable devices can be implemented in a variety of form
factors, including USB 2.0 flash drives, Secure Digital (SD) cards, and
CompactFlash cards.

Using ReadyBoost-capable flash memory devices for caching allows
Windows Vista to service random disk reads with performance that is
typically 8-10 times faster than random reads from traditional hard
drives. This caching is applied to all disk content, not just the page
file or system DLLs.

Of course, most flash devices are slower than the hard drive for
sequential I/O. To maximize performance, ReadyBoost includes logic to
recognize large, sequential read requests and then allows these
requests to be serviced by the hard drive.

An external ReadyBoost-capable device could be removed at any time. As
a result, one of the design goals for ReadyBoost was to ensure there
could be no interruption of system service or loss of data when removal
occurs. All data writes are made to the hard disk before being copied
to the flash device, so every bit of data held within the flash device
is safely duplicated on the hard disk.

After some period of usage, the flash device will likely contain
sensitive information. ReadyBoost encrypts the content for use only on
the PC system where the data was generated.

Windows ReadyDrive and Hybrid Hard Disk Drives
Windows ReadyDrive technology supports the use of hybrid hard disk
drives (H HDD). These are standard hard drives that include both
rotating media and an integrated cache of non-volatile flash memory
(also known as NVRAM). This cache buffers disk writes and allows the
disk drive to stay spun down for longer periods of time to increase
battery life and the overall reliability of the drives in mobile
systems. In addition, serving data from the non-volatile cache
increases the performance of the boot and resume processes as well as
disk- and memory-intensive applications by avoiding the latency of
random disk I/Os.

 
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Daniel
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      07-03-2006
Chris Lim wrote:
> Where are all the faster hard drives? They seem to be getting bigger
> and bigger but not a lot faster.
>
> Given that they are the bottleneck in most systems, I would've thought
> that some progress would've been made in this area by now. Is this
> anything in the pipeline? I hate the fact that a top end Pentium with
> an IDE or SATA drive still takes around the same time to boot as a
> budget Celeron!
>


If you're using Windows XP, I'm not sure getting a faster hard drive
will actually make an awful lot of difference.
Just thinking that the issues you're experiencing may be related to some
bit-rot (ie. software related) - assuming you're using Windows of course.

Just a thought.
 
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Chris Lim
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      07-04-2006
Daniel wrote:
> If you're using Windows XP, I'm not sure getting a faster hard drive
> will actually make an awful lot of difference.
> Just thinking that the issues you're experiencing may be related to some
> bit-rot (ie. software related) - assuming you're using Windows of course.


You think XP is so bad that some functions (e.g. boot up) perform the
same across different processor speeds? That someone it slows down a P4
3.2ghz CPU so that it takes about the same time to boot as a Celeron
2.0ghz?

I think I'll assume that the HD is the bottleneck rather than XP for
now.

 
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juicyjuice
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      07-04-2006
Not faster yet really, but alot of potential.

http://www.p2pnet.net/story/7124


"Colossal Storage will be the only drive in the world that will be able to
read any phase change disk with the capability of overwriting or infinitely
rewriting data to any phase change disk by changing the internal molecular
structure of the polarized atom dipole geometry without heat and cooling,"

fun words there heh


"Chris Lim" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
> Where are all the faster hard drives? They seem to be getting bigger
> and bigger but not a lot faster.
>
> Given that they are the bottleneck in most systems, I would've thought
> that some progress would've been made in this area by now. Is this
> anything in the pipeline? I hate the fact that a top end Pentium with
> an IDE or SATA drive still takes around the same time to boot as a
> budget Celeron!
>



 
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Daniel
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      07-04-2006
Chris Lim wrote:
> Daniel wrote:
>> If you're using Windows XP, I'm not sure getting a faster hard drive
>> will actually make an awful lot of difference.
>> Just thinking that the issues you're experiencing may be related to some
>> bit-rot (ie. software related) - assuming you're using Windows of course.

>
> You think XP is so bad that some functions (e.g. boot up) perform the
> same across different processor speeds? That someone it slows down a P4
> 3.2ghz CPU so that it takes about the same time to boot as a Celeron
> 2.0ghz?
>


I didn't say Win XP is bad. I said it might be related to bit-rot (which
may be the wrong term).
But, basically - yes, a Win XP machine can (and does) degrade in
performance over time - registry size & fragmentation, disk
fragmentation, malware, performance-degrading services etc etc.
 
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Chris Lim
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      07-04-2006
Daniel wrote:
> I didn't say Win XP is bad. I said it might be related to bit-rot (which
> may be the wrong term).
> But, basically - yes, a Win XP machine can (and does) degrade in
> performance over time - registry size & fragmentation, disk
> fragmentation, malware, performance-degrading services etc etc.


Oh, I see. Nah I just did a fresh install of a couple of machines, a
high spec one and a low spec one, and both had about the same boot up
time.

 
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XPD
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      07-04-2006

"Chris Lim" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
> I hate the fact that a top end Pentium with
> an IDE or SATA drive still takes around the same time to boot as a
> budget Celeron!
>


I dunno..... you tried booting WIn98 from a p4 3.0ghz 1gb system ? Boots
pretty damn fast compared to P2 with 98
--
XPD^
http://www.xpd.co.nz/


 
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MaHogany
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      07-04-2006
On Mon, 03 Jul 2006 15:56:39 -0700, Chris Lim wrote:

> I hate the fact that a top end Pentium with
> an IDE or SATA drive still takes around the same time to boot as a
> budget Celeron!


Then don't use Intal chips - use something better - like AMD64s.


Ma Hogany

--
Q: How do I make Windows(TM) go faster?
A: Throw it harder...

 
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