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Rock Bands Sue Sony Music

 
 
GraB
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      05-06-2006
http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?i...ort=0&sparte=4

http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7

Rock bands Cheap Trick and The Allman Brothers Band are suing Sony
Music, claiming they are being shortchanged on royalties for songs
downloaded legally over the Internet.

According to the suit, the record company is treating digital
downloads like traditional record sales, rather than licensed music,
triggering a different royalty deal.

Under that old rubrik, the record company deducts fees for the kind of
extra costs they used to incur when records were pressed on vinyl,
including packaging charges, restocking costs and losses due to
breakage.

Tracks sold over the Internet usually go for about 99 cents. About 70
cents of the sale price goes to Sony. The bands are getting about 4
1/2 cents per song, according to the suit, rather than the
approximately 30 cents they claim is rightfully theirs.
 
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Blofelds Cat
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      05-06-2006

"GraB" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?i...ort=0&sparte=4
>
> http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7
>
> Rock bands Cheap Trick and The Allman Brothers Band are suing Sony
> Music, claiming they are being shortchanged on royalties for songs
> downloaded legally over the Internet.
>
> According to the suit, the record company is treating digital
> downloads like traditional record sales, rather than licensed music,
> triggering a different royalty deal.
>
> Under that old rubrik, the record company deducts fees for the kind of
> extra costs they used to incur when records were pressed on vinyl,
> including packaging charges, restocking costs and losses due to
> breakage.
>
> Tracks sold over the Internet usually go for about 99 cents. About 70
> cents of the sale price goes to Sony. The bands are getting about 4
> 1/2 cents per song, according to the suit, rather than the
> approximately 30 cents they claim is rightfully theirs.


Ah yes, the ongoing hypocrisy of the music industry - bleat like hell about
how many trillions they are losing to file-sharing while at the same time
ripping the artists off at every turn, despite already taking the lion's
share of the profits.



 
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smithy
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-06-2006
what an opportunity to start charing for torrent material at a rate of
$2.00, 70% goes to artists, rest towards the network as a not for profit etc
that would screw the record lables, the fans sell their artists music for
them!


"Blofelds Cat" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "GraB" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?i...ort=0&sparte=4
>>
>> http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7
>>
>> Rock bands Cheap Trick and The Allman Brothers Band are suing Sony
>> Music, claiming they are being shortchanged on royalties for songs
>> downloaded legally over the Internet.
>>
>> According to the suit, the record company is treating digital
>> downloads like traditional record sales, rather than licensed music,
>> triggering a different royalty deal.
>>
>> Under that old rubrik, the record company deducts fees for the kind of
>> extra costs they used to incur when records were pressed on vinyl,
>> including packaging charges, restocking costs and losses due to
>> breakage.
>>
>> Tracks sold over the Internet usually go for about 99 cents. About 70
>> cents of the sale price goes to Sony. The bands are getting about 4
>> 1/2 cents per song, according to the suit, rather than the
>> approximately 30 cents they claim is rightfully theirs.

>
> Ah yes, the ongoing hypocrisy of the music industry - bleat like hell
> about how many trillions they are losing to file-sharing while at the same
> time ripping the artists off at every turn, despite already taking the
> lion's share of the profits.
>
>
>



 
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jcash
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-06-2006
if i remember correctly .....................the same ruse was employed by
record companies at the time compact discs were introduced..............
"GraB" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?i...ort=0&sparte=4
>
> http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7
>
> Rock bands Cheap Trick and The Allman Brothers Band are suing Sony
> Music, claiming they are being shortchanged on royalties for songs
> downloaded legally over the Internet.
>
> According to the suit, the record company is treating digital
> downloads like traditional record sales, rather than licensed music,
> triggering a different royalty deal.
>
> Under that old rubrik, the record company deducts fees for the kind of
> extra costs they used to incur when records were pressed on vinyl,
> including packaging charges, restocking costs and losses due to
> breakage.
>
> Tracks sold over the Internet usually go for about 99 cents. About 70
> cents of the sale price goes to Sony. The bands are getting about 4
> 1/2 cents per song, according to the suit, rather than the
> approximately 30 cents they claim is rightfully theirs.



 
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Je▀us
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-07-2006
On Sun, 07 May 2006 05:08:22 +1200, GraB proclaimed:

> http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?i...ort=0&sparte=4
>
> http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7
>
> Rock bands Cheap Trick and The Allman Brothers Band are suing Sony Music,
> claiming they are being shortchanged on royalties for songs downloaded
> legally over the Internet.
>
> According to the suit, the record company is treating digital downloads
> like traditional record sales, rather than licensed music, triggering a
> different royalty deal.
>
> Under that old rubrik, the record company deducts fees for the kind of
> extra costs they used to incur when records were pressed on vinyl,
> including packaging charges, restocking costs and losses due to breakage.
>
> Tracks sold over the Internet usually go for about 99 cents. About 70
> cents of the sale price goes to Sony. The bands are getting about 4 1/2
> cents per song, according to the suit, rather than the approximately 30
> cents they claim is rightfully theirs.


Yeah, that'd be right. I wish any and all bands the best of luck and I
hope they get to ream these so-called record companies like sony... these
companies are the enemy of artists and consumers alike.



--
/J/
Cut the crap to email me...
Webcam: http://homepages.picknowl.com.au/glen1070/x.jpg

 
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Michael
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      05-07-2006
"GraB" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7
> Under that old rubrik,


Sloppy journalism there. Associated Press need spell checkers. It's
'rubric'.


 
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free2002
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-07-2006
ahh yeah i'm sure all those people who dloaded a copy of 'Don't Be Cruel' or
'the Beat Police' would have gone out & bought the cd if it werent for the
fact they could get it for free off the net ;/

"GraB" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?i...ort=0&sparte=4
>
> http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7
>
> Rock bands Cheap Trick and The Allman Brothers Band are suing Sony
> Music, claiming they are being shortchanged on royalties for songs
> downloaded legally over the Internet.
>
> According to the suit, the record company is treating digital
> downloads like traditional record sales, rather than licensed music,
> triggering a different royalty deal.
>
> Under that old rubrik, the record company deducts fees for the kind of
> extra costs they used to incur when records were pressed on vinyl,
> including packaging charges, restocking costs and losses due to
> breakage.
>
> Tracks sold over the Internet usually go for about 99 cents. About 70
> cents of the sale price goes to Sony. The bands are getting about 4
> 1/2 cents per song, according to the suit, rather than the
> approximately 30 cents they claim is rightfully theirs.



 
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GraB
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-07-2006
On Sun, 7 May 2006 21:38:49 +1000, "free2002" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>ahh yeah i'm sure all those people who dloaded a copy of 'Don't Be Cruel' or
>'the Beat Police' would have gone out & bought the cd if it werent for the
>fact they could get it for free off the net ;/
>

http://www.unc.edu/~cigar/papers/Fil..._March2004.pdf

http://www.openp2p.com/pub/a/p2p/200...2p_debate.html

One could write a book on how the music suits are claiming losses that
they can't prove they are actually losing.
 
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GraB
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-07-2006
On Sat, 06 May 2006 21:13:02 GMT, "Blofelds Cat" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>
>"GraB" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:(E-Mail Removed).. .
>> http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?i...ort=0&sparte=4
>>
>> http://tinyurl.com/zq4r7
>>
>> Rock bands Cheap Trick and The Allman Brothers Band are suing Sony
>> Music, claiming they are being shortchanged on royalties for songs
>> downloaded legally over the Internet.
>>
>> According to the suit, the record company is treating digital
>> downloads like traditional record sales, rather than licensed music,
>> triggering a different royalty deal.
>>
>> Under that old rubrik, the record company deducts fees for the kind of
>> extra costs they used to incur when records were pressed on vinyl,
>> including packaging charges, restocking costs and losses due to
>> breakage.
>>
>> Tracks sold over the Internet usually go for about 99 cents. About 70
>> cents of the sale price goes to Sony. The bands are getting about 4
>> 1/2 cents per song, according to the suit, rather than the
>> approximately 30 cents they claim is rightfully theirs.

>
>Ah yes, the ongoing hypocrisy of the music industry - bleat like hell about
>how many trillions they are losing to file-sharing while at the same time
>ripping the artists off at every turn, despite already taking the lion's
>share of the profits.
>

From http://daviswiki.org/MP3s :

According to Moses Avalon's 1998 Book, Confessions of a Record
Producer, the proceeds of a then-$17 CD would typically be distributed
as follows: Retailer: $5 (29.4%), Record label: $4.92 (28.9%),
Distributor: $2.40 (14.1%), Giveaways: $1.80 (10.6%),
Duplication/recording: $1.10 (5.8%), Artist royalty: 83 cents (4.9%),
Songwriter license: 60 cents (3.5%), Producer royalty: 27 cents
(1.6%), Musicians union: 8 cents (0.4%). These figures show two
things: How little is spent on production and the artist, and how much
goes to the retailer and the record label. Yet $20 CDs - not just $17
CDs - are commonplace now. Nevertheless, since the book was released,
the cost of physical CD production has plummeted due to advances in CD
mastering technology, as well as decreases in prices of the materials
used in CDs themselves. Indeed, a common CD package may cost somewhere
between six and 50 cents to produce, depending mostly on the amount
and quality of liner-material.

Notice what the artists get. This breakdown stinks to high heaven.
If there is anyone robbing or hurting anyone, it is the record labels.

There was a big Rap group that declared bankruptcy. Turned out they
were getting 2% of the money from sales of their CDs.
 
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-=rjh=-
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-07-2006
GraB wrote:

>
> Notice what the artists get. This breakdown stinks to high heaven.
> If there is anyone robbing or hurting anyone, it is the record labels.


Actually, it is probably much worse than the example you give.

Steve Albini has something to say about all this, and he knows the business:

http://www.negativland.com/albini.html

"The Problem With Music
by Steve Albini

Whenever I talk to a band who are about to sign with a major label, I
always end up thinking of them in a particular context. I imagine a
trench, about four feet wide and five feet deep, maybe sixty yards long,
filled with runny, decaying..."

and the figures he gives at the end of the article are just amazing.


Other links:

http://blogcritics.org/archives/2003/06/10/155555.php

Robert Fripp has had an ongoing problem with EMI/Virgin which he details
in his diaries back in 2004, search in http://www.dgmlive.com/diaries.htm

BTW Fripp has been recording soundtracks for Vista - remember that Eno
did the Windows 95 startup sound?


 
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