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MP3's are soon to be made illegal..

 
 
zipdisk@clearxxxx.net.nz
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      04-26-2006


The Yanks are at it again..

http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/13336
 
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Have A Nice Cup of Tea
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      04-26-2006
On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 16:11:23 +1200, Philip wrote:

> http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>>
>> The Yanks are at it again..
>>
>> http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/13336

>
> If ever there was a reason to refuse a "free trade" agreement with the
> USA, this is it.


Why? Surely we don't need a reason not to have a free trade agreement.

And besides, there is a perfectly good Open Source, patent free and
unencumbered codec in the form of Ogg Vorbis. Available for all platforms,
and indistinguishable from MP3s for comparitive quality.


Have A Nice Cup of Tea

--
1/ Migration to Linux only costs money once. Higher Windows TCO is forever.
2/ "Shared source" is a poison pill. Open Source is freedom.
3/ Only the Windows boxes get the worms.

 
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-=rjh=-
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      04-26-2006
Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:
> On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 16:11:23 +1200, Philip wrote:
>
>> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>>> The Yanks are at it again..
>>>
>>> http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/13336

>> If ever there was a reason to refuse a "free trade" agreement with the
>> USA, this is it.

>
> Why? Surely we don't need a reason not to have a free trade agreement.
>
> And besides, there is a perfectly good Open Source, patent free and
> unencumbered codec in the form of Ogg Vorbis. Available for all platforms,
> and indistinguishable from MP3s for comparitive quality.


You're going off on a bit of a tangent there - the article doesn't
mention mp3s at all, I can't understand why the OP even mentioned them.

There are far larger issues at stake here, like even being in possession
of software that makes format shifting possible will be illegal.

Which is ignoring the fact that this software can be used to format
shift media from artists who encourage it.
 
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zipdisk@clearxxxx.net.nz
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      04-26-2006
On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 17:04:26 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 16:11:23 +1200, Philip wrote:
>
>> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>>>
>>> The Yanks are at it again..
>>>
>>> http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/13336

>>
>> If ever there was a reason to refuse a "free trade" agreement with the
>> USA, this is it.

>
>Why? Surely we don't need a reason not to have a free trade agreement.
>
>And besides, there is a perfectly good Open Source, patent free and
>unencumbered codec in the form of Ogg Vorbis. Available for all platforms,
>and indistinguishable from MP3s for comparitive quality.
>
>
>Have A Nice Cup of Tea




Go Read the Article, nothing is valid even your Ogg Vorbis.

 
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Philip
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      04-26-2006
Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:
> On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 16:11:23 +1200, Philip wrote:
>
>> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>>> The Yanks are at it again..
>>>
>>> http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/13336

>> If ever there was a reason to refuse a "free trade" agreement with the
>> USA, this is it.

>
> Why? Surely we don't need a reason not to have a free trade agreement.


Both the leading political parties in this country are presenting it as
desirable.

>
> And besides, there is a perfectly good Open Source, patent free and
> unencumbered codec in the form of Ogg Vorbis. Available for all platforms,
> and indistinguishable from MP3s for comparitive quality.
>


The proposed prohibition law doesn't mention specific compression
systems - it's all abouot giving total control to the content industry
and taking away the remnants of fair use that still survive after Bill
Clinton signed the disgraceful DMCA into law.

FTA or not, we will see substantial pressure here, sooner rather than
later, for wholly unwarranted extensions of copyright terms,
restrictions of format shifting and lockdowns of equipment, all in the
name of protecting against "piracy".

We do particularly badly in all of this because the content companies
would like to see region coding recognised as part of copyright
protection - which at present it's not by default in NZ and by court
decision in Oz.

This nonsense, brought into being by corrupt senators and congressmen in
the US, richly paid off by the content industry, is a huge strike
against creativity and freedom of expression.

Philip
 
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Have A Nice Cup of Tea
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Posts: n/a
 
      04-26-2006
On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 18:51:23 +1200, Philip wrote:

> This nonsense, brought into being by corrupt senators and congressmen in
> the US, richly paid off by the content industry, is a huge strike
> against creativity and freedom of expression.


Yup agreed - it is.

And guess which IT company is the most prolific at lobbying and funding
american politicians?


Have A Nice Cup of Tea

--
1/ Migration to Linux only costs money once. Higher Windows TCO is forever.
2/ "Shared source" is a poison pill. Open Source is freedom.
3/ Only the Windows boxes get the worms.

 
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Matthew Poole
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      04-26-2006
On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 18:51:23 +1200, someone purporting to be Philip didst
scrawl:

> Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:

*SNIP*
> FTA or not, we will see substantial pressure here, sooner rather than
> later, for wholly unwarranted extensions of copyright terms,
> restrictions of format shifting and lockdowns of equipment, all in the
> name of protecting against "piracy".
>

Dunno where you live, but in NZ it's already illegal to format-shift
anything.

> We do particularly badly in all of this because the content companies
> would like to see region coding recognised as part of copyright
> protection - which at present it's not by default in NZ and by court
> decision in Oz.
>

Wasn't region-encoding dropped in HD-DVD and BluRay?

> This nonsense, brought into being by corrupt senators and congressmen in
> the US, richly paid off by the content industry, is a huge strike
> against creativity and freedom of expression.
>

They're not that "richly paid off", either. People like the Senator from
Disney have been bought for a paltry USD20k. The sums involved are so
small that every time legislation like this is mentioned on Slashdot,
people talk about getting everyone the contribute a buck, to go and buy a
few elected officials to lobby on behalf of the consumer.

--
Matthew Poole
"Don't use force. Get a bigger hammer."

 
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Geopelia
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      04-26-2006
What are MP3's?


 
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Philip
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      04-26-2006
Geopelia wrote:
> What are MP3's?
>
>

It is a measure of the cubic capacity of Members of Parliament to pass
daft laws, and is therefore unbounded. In the case of Jonathan Hunt, it
is a measure of his cubic capacity after lunch, and is therefore
unbounded, unless he has already burst, messily.

A secondary meaning is that it names a system of sampling and reduction
of a sound file that makes it smaller without affecting the perceived
sound quality too much, though hi-fi enthusiasts and people with sharp
(or even more than one) ears might disagree.

MP3 means that you can take a sound file that was 6 megabytes and reduce
it to 2 or fewer, so it fits in some portable memory device like an iPod
or anther MP3 player. It therefore allows people to record sound tracks
from CDs and convert the resulting files to MP3s, which take up much
less space and can be sent across the Internet, which enrages some
welathy ASmericans called the RIAA (Really Idiotic Attorney Actions) who
have recently filed lawsuits for sharing MP3 files against a person who
died in 2004, and another suit against a family that doesn't even own a
computer.

This process, called format shifting, is illegal in NZ, and therefore
cannot legally be recommended, although everyone does it, except the two
deaf old buggers in the pub sitting underneath the Sky screen, and about
another quarter of the population, does it and the music and home
electronics industries make a deal of money from it. The recoridng
industry denies making any money, ever, from anything, until people stop
exchanging MP3s. This is an item of religious belief in the music
industry, which worships many false gods and wishes it was still selling
brittle black shellac records at 1 shilling and 10 pence at Marbecks,
because they sounded pretty poor the first time round and it is a pig of
a job to copy them.

The MP3 process was refined at the Fraunhöfer Institute in Germany, and
they own the rights to the process, although they are not about to come
round to your place and yell at you for using it.

There are other audio compression systems, including the wondrously
nambed Ogg Vorbis, who sounds like an enforcer for Baycorp, and wmp,
which is a system devised by the Voles of Redmond, aka Microsoft, so to
seed the file that it will only allow itself to play once, or refuse to
be copied, or some other such restriction.

These restrictions relate to what is called Digital Rights Management
(DRM) which is best compared to a book publisher that sells you a book
and then says well, you can only read it once and all the words will
fall out, or you can read it as many times as you like but only in the
lounge room, and if you want to read it in bed you have to buy another copy.

It is truly a mad world we live in, my masters.

Philip


..

 
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Geopelia
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      04-26-2006

"Philip" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Geopelia wrote:
>> What are MP3's?

> It is a measure of the cubic capacity of Members of Parliament to pass
> daft laws, and is therefore unbounded. In the case of Jonathan Hunt, it is
> a measure of his cubic capacity after lunch, and is therefore unbounded,
> unless he has already burst, messily.
>
> A secondary meaning is that it names a system of sampling and reduction of
> a sound file that makes it smaller without affecting the perceived sound
> quality too much, though hi-fi enthusiasts and people with sharp (or even
> more than one) ears might disagree.
>
> MP3 means that you can take a sound file that was 6 megabytes and reduce
> it to 2 or fewer, so it fits in some portable memory device like an iPod
> or anther MP3 player. It therefore allows people to record sound tracks
> from CDs and convert the resulting files to MP3s, which take up much less
> space and can be sent across the Internet, which enrages some welathy
> ASmericans called the RIAA (Really Idiotic Attorney Actions) who have
> recently filed lawsuits for sharing MP3 files against a person who died in
> 2004, and another suit against a family that doesn't even own a computer.
>
> This process, called format shifting, is illegal in NZ, and therefore
> cannot legally be recommended, although everyone does it, except the two
> deaf old buggers in the pub sitting underneath the Sky screen, and about
> another quarter of the population, does it and the music and home
> electronics industries make a deal of money from it. The recoridng
> industry denies making any money, ever, from anything, until people stop
> exchanging MP3s. This is an item of religious belief in the music
> industry, which worships many false gods and wishes it was still selling
> brittle black shellac records at 1 shilling and 10 pence at Marbecks,
> because they sounded pretty poor the first time round and it is a pig of a
> job to copy them.
>
> The MP3 process was refined at the Fraunhöfer Institute in Germany, and
> they own the rights to the process, although they are not about to come
> round to your place and yell at you for using it.
>
> There are other audio compression systems, including the wondrously nambed
> Ogg Vorbis, who sounds like an enforcer for Baycorp, and wmp, which is a
> system devised by the Voles of Redmond, aka Microsoft, so to seed the file
> that it will only allow itself to play once, or refuse to be copied, or
> some other such restriction.
>
> These restrictions relate to what is called Digital Rights Management
> (DRM) which is best compared to a book publisher that sells you a book and
> then says well, you can only read it once and all the words will fall out,
> or you can read it as many times as you like but only in the lounge room,
> and if you want to read it in bed you have to buy another copy.
>
> It is truly a mad world we live in, my masters.
>
> Philip
>
>

.
Thank you. So it's this way of getting round music copyright that the
government is trying to stop? I wouldn't be able to do it even if I wanted
to, which I don't.
Nice to know what it is, though.

Geopelia


 
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