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Micro$oft is in trouble

 
 
Have A Nice Cup of Tea
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      04-04-2006
http://weblog.infoworld.com/itxtreme...ginning_o.html

"Bill and Steve did too good a job at winning, and were left without real
competitiors too long. Dulls the edge of the organization. And that is the
beginning of the end."

Tee hee hee. )


Have A Nice Cup of Tea

--
Joe Barr: "So the question is not 'Is Microsoft lying?' It's deeper than that.
The real question is, 'Is Microsoft capable of honesty?' And if you decide -
as I have - that they are not, the next question becomes, 'Do I really want
to do business with, to trust my business to, a company like that?'"

 
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Mauricio Freitas [MVP]
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      04-04-2006
"Have A Nice Cup of Tea" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed)...
> http://weblog.infoworld.com/itxtreme...ginning_o.html
>
> "Bill and Steve did too good a job at winning, and were left without real
> competitiors too long. Dulls the edge of the organization. And that is the
> beginning of the end."
>
> Tee hee hee. )
>


While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would benefit such
a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we (users, enterprises) in
a position to find a valid replacement that would rapidly enable the same
level of funtionality?

Let's say, for the sake of an argument, that Microsoft does sucumbe to the
attack of a governamental initiated lawsuit, and due to costs and other side
effects it decides to close its doors, in let's say, 6 months.

How are organisations that currently rely on Microsoft technologies will
cope? Is the whole civilisation going to reach a standstill point, waiting
for other technologies to catch up, waiting for people to be trained,
waiting for deployment projects to be completed?

Really, change is inevitable, but why people are happy in promoting the
change, just for the sake of it?


--

Mauricio Freitas
www.geekzone.co.nz, www.geekzone.co.nz/freitasm,
www.geekzone.co.nz/geekzoneblog.asp
Software for Pocket PC: www.geekzone.co.nz/store
Microsoft MVP Mobile Devices


 
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thingy
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      04-04-2006
Mauricio Freitas [MVP] wrote:
> "Have A Nice Cup of Tea" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>>http://weblog.infoworld.com/itxtreme...ginning_o.html
>>
>>"Bill and Steve did too good a job at winning, and were left without real
>>competitiors too long. Dulls the edge of the organization. And that is the
>>beginning of the end."
>>
>>Tee hee hee. )
>>

>
>
> While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would benefit such
> a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we (users, enterprises) in
> a position to find a valid replacement that would rapidly enable the same
> level of funtionality?
>
> Let's say, for the sake of an argument, that Microsoft does sucumbe to the
> attack of a governamental initiated lawsuit, and due to costs and other side
> effects it decides to close its doors, in let's say, 6 months.
>
> How are organisations that currently rely on Microsoft technologies will
> cope?


Businesses should have contingency plans in place that allows them to
replace critical infrastructure. Any competant business should be in a
position to know what is critical, how to replace it and how long such a
process would take.

Is the whole civilisation going to reach a standstill point, waiting
> for other technologies to catch up, waiting for people to be trained,
> waiting for deployment projects to be completed?
>
> Really, change is inevitable, but why people are happy in promoting the
> change, just for the sake of it?
>
>


In terms of quality assurance/improvement of a business; quantify what
you have, look for improvements, impliment them where they add up
quantify the improvement. If there is more keep it, if there is less
move back.

Change is the search and hopefully finding of a way of doing things
better and/or cheaper.

regards

Thing


















 
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thingy
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      04-04-2006
Mauricio Freitas [MVP] wrote:
> "Have A Nice Cup of Tea" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>>http://weblog.infoworld.com/itxtreme...ginning_o.html
>>
>>"Bill and Steve did too good a job at winning, and were left without real
>>competitiors too long. Dulls the edge of the organization. And that is the
>>beginning of the end."
>>
>>Tee hee hee. )
>>

>
>
> While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would benefit such
> a large corporation crumbling at this point?


Did Wang customers benefit when Wang shut its doors? Did Digital or Dec
customers? Did countries collapse? no. These companies lost the plot,
they wont collapse overnight. They will collapse as companies and people
leave them and at some point they will implode because their cost
structure is based on monopoly profit margins and not realistic ones
most companies survive under.

Are we (users, enterprises) in
> a position to find a valid replacement that would rapidly enable the same
> level of funtionality?
>
> Let's say, for the sake of an argument, that Microsoft does sucumbe to the
> attack of a governamental initiated lawsuit, and due to costs and other side
> effects it decides to close its doors, in let's say, 6 months.
>
> How are organisations that currently rely on Microsoft technologies will
> cope? Is the whole civilisation going to reach a standstill point, waiting
> for other technologies to catch up, waiting for people to be trained,
> waiting for deployment projects to be completed?
>
> Really, change is inevitable, but why people are happy in promoting the
> change, just for the sake of it?


Change is usually for the better. MS changes, it brings out new OSes
every few years which we rush/are forced to upgrade to.....at our
expense and risk.

Unixes were overpriced and staid, MS started to eat their lunch, Linux
came along and joined in.

In turn something will replace Linux.....or Linux will morf into
something just about un-recognisable. This will happen because there
will be a need to be filled and the existing wont fill it. I suspect
Linux will morf and because of its cost structure and developer base it
will do so as needed at the pace needed. MS on the other hand is a
company and companies suffers from shareholders, their income stream
screams to be protected and ultimately I dont think that is possible.

regards

Thing


 
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Mauricio Freitas [MVP]
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      04-04-2006
"thingy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Mauricio Freitas [MVP] wrote:
>> While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would benefit
>> such a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we (users,
>> enterprises) in a position to find a valid replacement that would rapidly
>> enable the same level of funtionality?
>>
>> Let's say, for the sake of an argument, that Microsoft does sucumbe to
>> the attack of a governamental initiated lawsuit, and due to costs and
>> other side effects it decides to close its doors, in let's say, 6 months.
>>
>> How are organisations that currently rely on Microsoft technologies will
>> cope?

>
> Businesses should have contingency plans in place that allows them to
> replace critical infrastructure. Any competant business should be in a
> position to know what is critical, how to replace it and how long such a
> process would take.
>
> Is the whole civilisation going to reach a standstill point, waiting
>> for other technologies to catch up, waiting for people to be trained,
>> waiting for deployment projects to be completed?
>>
>> Really, change is inevitable, but why people are happy in promoting the
>> change, just for the sake of it?
>>
>>

>
> In terms of quality assurance/improvement of a business; quantify what you
> have, look for improvements, impliment them where they add up quantify the
> improvement. If there is more keep it, if there is less move back.
>
> Change is the search and hopefully finding of a way of doing things better
> and/or cheaper.
>
> regards
>
> Thing
>


Thing, this is a very good answer to my post! I'd just hope some businesses
had the contingency in place...

--

Mauricio Freitas
www.geekzone.co.nz, www.geekzone.co.nz/freitasm,
www.geekzone.co.nz/geekzoneblog.asp
Software for Pocket PC: www.geekzone.co.nz/store
Microsoft MVP Mobile Devices


 
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Roger_Nickel
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Posts: n/a
 
      04-04-2006
Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:
> http://weblog.infoworld.com/itxtreme...ginning_o.html
>
>
> "Bill and Steve did too good a job at winning, and were left
> without real competitiors too long. Dulls the edge of the
> organization. And that is the beginning of the end."
>
> Tee hee hee. )
>
>
> Have A Nice Cup of Tea
>

Doesn't mention the role of Paul Allen in the history of MS.
http://www.pbs.org/cringely/pulpit/pulpit20060330.html .
Difficult to grow by chewing up other people's ideas when you are
the monopoly. The history of MS resembles the early history of
General Motors, they will have to break up into small parts losely
joined or die. Perhaps Bill and Steve should read Richard Tainter
on "The Collapse of Complex Societies" and then sit back and
contemplate MS Vista; an outstanding example of diminishing
returns from increased complexity.
 
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Mark Robinson
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      04-04-2006
Mauricio Freitas [MVP] wrote:
> "Have A Nice Cup of Tea" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news(E-Mail Removed)...
>> http://weblog.infoworld.com/itxtreme...ginning_o.html
>>
>> "Bill and Steve did too good a job at winning, and were left without real
>> competitiors too long. Dulls the edge of the organization. And that is the
>> beginning of the end."
>>
>> Tee hee hee. )
>>

>
> While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would benefit such
> a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we (users, enterprises) in
> a position to find a valid replacement that would rapidly enable the same
> level of funtionality?
>
> Let's say, for the sake of an argument, that Microsoft does sucumbe to the
> attack of a governamental initiated lawsuit, and due to costs and other side
> effects it decides to close its doors, in let's say, 6 months.
>
> How are organisations that currently rely on Microsoft technologies will
> cope? Is the whole civilisation going to reach a standstill point, waiting
> for other technologies to catch up, waiting for people to be trained,
> waiting for deployment projects to be completed?


Microsoft disappearing will not make my (rarely used) Windows 98 machine stop
working. XP and Vista users may have other problems. More fool they. Why on
earth people pay the devil to take their souls I do not know.

Very few computers running Microsoft product actually make or produce anything.
They are almost universally overheads and not assets, sitting there doing
nothing with almost all their processor cycles interupted only rarely to
process a keystroke adding a character to a text document or move a virtual
solitaire card. Meanwhile they burn ever increasing amounts of energy.

How many computers have you seen that actually make things ?

How many have you seen that just sit on someone's desk doing stuff that could
be more profitably be done with a pen and a piece of paper ?

As for waiting for other technologies to catch up, au contraire, in the real
world we've been waiting for Microsoft to catch up ever since they released
their first DOS. Multiprocessing, multiple accounts, file protections,
privilege separation, user and process accounting and all the other
technologies that were in existence way back when Gates and Allen were hacking
the guts out of CP/M and the DEC OSes but which they chose to leave out.
They've been struggling to get them in ever since and the result is plain to
see in the wide range of antivirus companies which specialise solely in threats
to Microsoft's products.

http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,1945808,00.asp

> Really, change is inevitable, but why people are happy in promoting the
> change, just for the sake of it?


Perhaps they wish to improve things rather than simply change.

If I buy a computer and an operating system to run on it I expect the
combination to be under MY control, not the vendors. They have my money, they
are my servants and not the other way around.

http://xbox-linux.sourceforge.net/do...otedelete.html

Throwing off tyranny and oppression seems like a reasonably good reason for
change to me. Microsoft are an integral part of a wider problem in that regard.
 
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Have A Nice Cup of Tea
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      04-04-2006
On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 23:37:29 +1200, Mauricio Freitas [MVP] wrote:

> While I agree with some points, I have to ask: to whom it would benefit such
> a large corporation crumbling at this point? Are we (users, enterprises) in
> a position to find a valid replacement that would rapidly enable the same
> level of funtionality?


There already exists the means to completely replace all Micro$oft
software with other software.


Have A Nice Cup of Tea

--
1/ Migration to Linux only costs money once. Higher Windows TCO is forever.
2/ "Shared source" is a poison pill. Open Source is freedom.
3/ Only the Windows boxes get the worms.

 
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Have A Nice Cup of Tea
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      04-04-2006
On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 09:09:23 +1200, Mark Robinson wrote:

> If I buy a computer and an operating system to run on it I expect the
> combination to be under MY control, not the vendors. They have my money, they
> are my servants and not the other way around.


Micro$oft wants you thinking otherwise.


Have A Nice Cup of Tea

--
1/ Migration to Linux only costs money once. Higher Windows TCO is forever.
2/ "Shared source" is a poison pill. Open Source is freedom.
3/ Only the Windows boxes get the worms.

 
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Patrick FitzGerald
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      04-04-2006
On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 09:43:22 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>
>There already exists the means to completely replace all Micro$oft
>software with other software.



And that is another reason why Microsoft have their nasty TCPA ,
formerly known as Palladium,

Once they get control of the hardware then Microsoft can decide l
what programs they will let you run.


Patrick
 
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