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Computer Clock Problems

 
 
Shane
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-05-2006
On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 13:52:45 +1300, Waylon Kenning wrote:

> T'was the Sun, 01 Jan 2006 20:02:29 +1300 when I remembered Jerry
> <(E-Mail Removed)> saying something like this:
>
>>Mine was doing that a while ago, actually I've had that problem twice
>>now. It isn't likely to bbe the CMOS battery, no matter how many people
>>tell you to change it. A CMOS battery failure doesn't make your clock
>>run slow, it makes the settings go away altogether, and only when the
>>computer is powered off.

>
> Mine started playing up after a nearby lightning storm. Would slowly gain
> time, meaning I thought I was late for everything, but quietly surprised
> when instead I was massively early. Makes a change from normal...
>
> I guess it's the motherboard. You can get programs to update your time
> automatically from the internet.




http://www.cs.utah.edu/support/faq/ntp/faq-ntp.html

Windows Users
For Windows XP go to your Control Panel and start up the "Date and Time" panel.
Select the "Internet Time" tab and enter timemaster.cs.utah.edu.

If you wish to install an NTP client on an older Windows machine, one of
the most useful and free programs out there is NetTime. You can find it on
many Windows resource sites. It possesses a simple interface for
configuration. It runs on all Windows platforms, but as an added bonus it
runs as a resource under Windows NT/2000. Simply add our time server to
the software's configuration and you're done.


Unix Users
Implementing clients that sync their time off of timemaster.cs.utah.edu is rather
straight forward:

* Two executables must be present: ntpd and ntpdate. These should exist in
/usr/local/sbin.
* The file /etc/ntp.conf must exist, and be configured for our environment.
* There should also be a startup file, in /etc/init.d and linked to the various
rcX.d directories, although this will depend on your computer OS
version.
Files for for Irix, HPUX and Solaris are available here.

Once these files are in place, all you have to do is run the startup file
to run ntpdate (which sets the clock explicitly), and then starts up ntpd
(the daemon that keeps the time in sync with the server). When starting
ntpd, please make sure that other time-keeping utilities, such as AFS and
timed, are turned off, or other you'll start a war over time control.
(This is something to be avoided!) That's it. Once ntpd is running, you
should be set.

--
Dammit Jim, I'm an actor, not a doctor.

 
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Mark C
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-05-2006
Shane <(E-Mail Removed)-a-geek.net> wrote in
news(E-Mail Removed)-a-geek.net:

> http://www.cs.utah.edu/support/faq/ntp/faq-ntp.html
>
> Windows Users
> For Windows XP go to your Control Panel and start up the "Date
> and Time" panel. Select the "Internet Time" tab and enter
> timemaster.cs.utah.edu.


Or to be a better internet citizen (and use a local server with
better ping), use:
nz.pool.ntp.org
.... or if you need a list of (random nz) servers for fallback:
0.nz.pool.ntp.org;1.nz.pool.ntp.org;2.nz.pool.ntp. org

> If you wish to install an NTP client on an older Windows
> machine, one of the most useful and free programs out there is
> NetTime. You can find it on many Windows resource sites. It
> possesses a simple interface for configuration. It runs on all
> Windows platforms, but as an added bonus it runs as a resource
> under Windows NT/2000. Simply add our time server to the
> software's configuration and you're done.


Also, the W32Time service is available for Windows NT
ftp://ftp.microsoft.com/reskit/y2kfix/x86/w32time/
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/246145

.... However, I don't think that the XP or 2000 or NT (link above)
W32Time service can correct for skew.

More info here:
http://www.ntp.org/ntpfaq/NTP-s-def-impl.htm

> Unix Users
> Implementing clients that sync their time off of
> timemaster.cs.utah.edu is rather straight forward:
>
> * Two executables must be present: ntpd and ntpdate. These
> should exist in
> /usr/local/sbin.
> * The file /etc/ntp.conf must exist, and be configured for
> our environment. * There should also be a startup file, in
> /etc/init.d and linked to the various
> rcX.d directories, although this will depend on your
> computer OS version.
> Files for for Irix, HPUX and Solaris are available here.
>
> Once these files are in place, all you have to do is run the
> startup file to run ntpdate (which sets the clock explicitly),
> and then starts up ntpd (the daemon that keeps the time in sync
> with the server). When starting ntpd, please make sure that
> other time-keeping utilities, such as AFS and timed, are turned
> off, or other you'll start a war over time control. (This is
> something to be avoided!) That's it. Once ntpd is running, you
> should be set.


 
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Jerry
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-05-2006
Shane wrote:
> On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 13:52:45 +1300, Waylon Kenning wrote:
>
>
>>T'was the Sun, 01 Jan 2006 20:02:29 +1300 when I remembered Jerry
>><(E-Mail Removed)> saying something like this:
>>
>>
>>>Mine was doing that a while ago, actually I've had that problem twice
>>>now. It isn't likely to bbe the CMOS battery, no matter how many people
>>>tell you to change it. A CMOS battery failure doesn't make your clock
>>>run slow, it makes the settings go away altogether, and only when the
>>>computer is powered off.

>>
>>Mine started playing up after a nearby lightning storm. Would slowly gain
>>time, meaning I thought I was late for everything, but quietly surprised
>>when instead I was massively early. Makes a change from normal...
>>
>>I guess it's the motherboard. You can get programs to update your time
>>automatically from the internet.

>
>
>
>
> http://www.cs.utah.edu/support/faq/ntp/faq-ntp.html
>
> Windows Users
> For Windows XP go to your Control Panel and start up the "Date and Time" panel.
> Select the "Internet Time" tab and enter timemaster.cs.utah.edu.
>
> If you wish to install an NTP client on an older Windows machine, one of
> the most useful and free programs out there is NetTime. You can find it on
> many Windows resource sites. It possesses a simple interface for
> configuration. It runs on all Windows platforms, but as an added bonus it
> runs as a resource under Windows NT/2000. Simply add our time server to
> the software's configuration and you're done.
>
>
> Unix Users
> Implementing clients that sync their time off of timemaster.cs.utah.edu is rather
> straight forward:
>
> * Two executables must be present: ntpd and ntpdate. These should exist in
> /usr/local/sbin.
> * The file /etc/ntp.conf must exist, and be configured for our environment.
> * There should also be a startup file, in /etc/init.d and linked to the various
> rcX.d directories, although this will depend on your computer OS
> version.
> Files for for Irix, HPUX and Solaris are available here.
>
> Once these files are in place, all you have to do is run the startup file
> to run ntpdate (which sets the clock explicitly), and then starts up ntpd
> (the daemon that keeps the time in sync with the server). When starting
> ntpd, please make sure that other time-keeping utilities, such as AFS and
> timed, are turned off, or other you'll start a war over time control.
> (This is something to be avoided!) That's it. Once ntpd is running, you
> should be set.
>

Synching the time doesn't fix the problem though. The OP here never
came back, if we knew if it was bios or windows losing time we would
know what he should be working on, hardware or windows. When I had the
problem the bios clock was right, the windows clock was gaining time.
 
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Robin Halligan
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-05-2006
On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 14:00:28 +1300, Shane wrote:

> Windows Users
> For Windows XP go to your Control Panel and start up the "Date and Time" panel.
> Select the "Internet Time" tab and enter timemaster.cs.utah.edu.


or you could try tk1.ihug.co.nz


--
Red Dwarf Future Echoes
I am Holly, the ships computer, with an IQ of 6000, the same IQ as 6000 PE
teachers.
Holly
 
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Shane
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-05-2006
On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 04:34:03 +0000, Mark C wrote:


> Or to be a better internet citizen (and use a local server with better
> ping), use:
> nz.pool.ntp.org
> ... or if you need a list of (random nz) servers for fallback:
> 0.nz.pool.ntp.org;1.nz.pool.ntp.org;2.nz.pool.ntp. org


I should be more judicious with my copy and pastes :\
--
Unix weanies are as bad at this as anyone.
-- Larry Wall in <(E-Mail Removed)>

 
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