Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > NZ Computing > Microsoft Gets Tough(er) on Windows Piracy...

Reply
Thread Tools

Microsoft Gets Tough(er) on Windows Piracy...

 
 
steve
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-27-2005

************************************************** *****************************

http://www.globetechnology.com/servl...International/

Bill Gates will be frisking you with a simple point and click

By SIMON AVERY
Tuesday, July 26, 2005 Updated at 5:17 AM EDT
From Tuesday's Globe and Mail

The next time you visit the website of Microsoft Corp. to download some
software, be prepared to let the world's biggest software company have a
look inside your computer.

In a determined strike to quell the proliferation of counterfeit
software, beginning today, Microsoft will require that all customers
coming to its website for upgrades and other downloads submit their
computers to an electronic frisking.

If you use one of the estimated hundred million PCs running pirated
software, don't expect your upgrade. For Microsoft, the new policy is a
stepped-up effort to combat the loss of billions of dollars worth of
software sales every year to counterfeiters around the world. But in
ramping up efforts to fight piracy, the Redmond, Wash.-based behemoth
already finds itself fending off critics over privacy.

......

The company will scan machines for a variety of information, including
product keys or software authorization codes, operating-system version
and details on the flow of data between the operating system and other
hardware, such as printers.

It is access to this information that particularly upsets the privacy
advocates. Ms. Dixon says the only information Microsoft needs to fight
piracy is the product key and the operating-system version, and she says
that Microsoft will be able to identify users uniquely based on some of
the information the company collects.

"They are grabbing more information than they need to deter piracy," she
said.

If Microsoft deems a PC to be carrying contraband code, it won't allow a
user to download Microsoft programs, with the exception of security
patches. But the software company — which says that more than one in
five U.S. computers runs a counterfeit version of its Windows product —
is not just waving a stick. It is also offering a big carrot.

Microsoft said it will give a free copy of its Windows XP to customers
who unknowingly bought a counterfeit version of the operating system and
who fill out a piracy report, provide proof of purchase and send
Microsoft the counterfeit CDs.

Customers who cannot provide proof of purchase but file a piracy report
will receive a substantial discount on a legitimate version of the
operating system, said Tim Prime, a product manager in the Windows
client group at Microsoft Canada Co., a subsidiary of the U.S. company.

Executives at Microsoft reject any suggestions that the move will
antagonize customers with privacy concerns.

"Customers want to know whether retailers have sold them genuine
software," Mr. Prime said.

More than 40 million users agreed to have their systems scanned in a
10-month trial that began last September in several countries. The
participation rate amounted to 58 per cent of all visitors to the pilot
website, far exceeding Microsoft's expectations of just 10 per cent, Mr.
Prime said.

Microsoft said no personal data will be collected during the validation
process, and information will remain completely anonymous. The company
said it commissioned TÜV-ITÖ, an independent German security auditor, to
test how well its Windows Genuine Advantage program protects customers'
data, and the firm concluded that Microsoft does not collect any
personal information that would allow it to identify or contact a user.

Seth Schoen, a staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation,
a civil liberties group in San Francisco specializing in technology
issues, agreed that Microsoft would not be able to identify customers
personally through the program. But the data collected are unique to
every customer, just as human fingerprints are unique, and the issue
becomes how long the company holds onto the details and whether they
could become personally identifying later on, he said.

Technology companies have walked a fine line for years on the issue of
collecting information from consumers' computers. Six years ago,
RealNetworks Inc., whose software plays audio and video content on the
Internet, released a patch for its RealJukebox program after the public
learned the software was relaying personal information about users to
the company.

More recently, Google Inc. created a privacy backlash when it said its
free e-mail service, Gmail, would include special software that inserts
ads into personal e-mails based on their content.

Clearly, Microsoft believes any risk of public-privacy concerns are
worth incurring to fight a problem that has turned into an epidemic in
some parts of the world.

Microsoft has been fighting counterfeit efforts for years with limited
success. It says that 35 per cent of the world's computers run
counterfeit software and that piracy cost the global software industry
$41-billion in 2004.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
thingy
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-27-2005
steve wrote:
>
> ************************************************** *****************************
>
>
> http://www.globetechnology.com/servl...International/
>
>
> Bill Gates will be frisking you with a simple point and click
>
> By SIMON AVERY
> Tuesday, July 26, 2005 Updated at 5:17 AM EDT
> From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
>
> The next time you visit the website of Microsoft Corp. to download some
> software, be prepared to let the world's biggest software company have a
> look inside your computer.
>
> In a determined strike to quell the proliferation of counterfeit
> software, beginning today, Microsoft will require that all customers
> coming to its website for upgrades and other downloads submit their
> computers to an electronic frisking.
>
> If you use one of the estimated hundred million PCs running pirated
> software, don't expect your upgrade. For Microsoft, the new policy is a
> stepped-up effort to combat the loss of billions of dollars worth of
> software sales every year to counterfeiters around the world. But in
> ramping up efforts to fight piracy, the Redmond, Wash.-based behemoth
> already finds itself fending off critics over privacy.
>
> .....
>
> The company will scan machines for a variety of information, including
> product keys or software authorization codes, operating-system version
> and details on the flow of data between the operating system and other
> hardware, such as printers.
>
> It is access to this information that particularly upsets the privacy
> advocates. Ms. Dixon says the only information Microsoft needs to fight
> piracy is the product key and the operating-system version, and she says
> that Microsoft will be able to identify users uniquely based on some of
> the information the company collects.
>
> "They are grabbing more information than they need to deter piracy," she
> said.
>
> If Microsoft deems a PC to be carrying contraband code, it won't allow a
> user to download Microsoft programs, with the exception of security
> patches. But the software company — which says that more than one in
> five U.S. computers runs a counterfeit version of its Windows product —
> is not just waving a stick. It is also offering a big carrot.
>
> Microsoft said it will give a free copy of its Windows XP to customers
> who unknowingly bought a counterfeit version of the operating system and
> who fill out a piracy report, provide proof of purchase and send
> Microsoft the counterfeit CDs.
>
> Customers who cannot provide proof of purchase but file a piracy report
> will receive a substantial discount on a legitimate version of the
> operating system, said Tim Prime, a product manager in the Windows
> client group at Microsoft Canada Co., a subsidiary of the U.S. company.
>
> Executives at Microsoft reject any suggestions that the move will
> antagonize customers with privacy concerns.
>
> "Customers want to know whether retailers have sold them genuine
> software," Mr. Prime said.
>
> More than 40 million users agreed to have their systems scanned in a
> 10-month trial that began last September in several countries. The
> participation rate amounted to 58 per cent of all visitors to the pilot
> website, far exceeding Microsoft's expectations of just 10 per cent, Mr.
> Prime said.
>
> Microsoft said no personal data will be collected during the validation
> process, and information will remain completely anonymous. The company
> said it commissioned TÜV-ITÖ, an independent German security auditor, to
> test how well its Windows Genuine Advantage program protects customers'
> data, and the firm concluded that Microsoft does not collect any
> personal information that would allow it to identify or contact a user.
>
> Seth Schoen, a staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation,
> a civil liberties group in San Francisco specializing in technology
> issues, agreed that Microsoft would not be able to identify customers
> personally through the program. But the data collected are unique to
> every customer, just as human fingerprints are unique, and the issue
> becomes how long the company holds onto the details and whether they
> could become personally identifying later on, he said.
>
> Technology companies have walked a fine line for years on the issue of
> collecting information from consumers' computers. Six years ago,
> RealNetworks Inc., whose software plays audio and video content on the
> Internet, released a patch for its RealJukebox program after the public
> learned the software was relaying personal information about users to
> the company.
>
> More recently, Google Inc. created a privacy backlash when it said its
> free e-mail service, Gmail, would include special software that inserts
> ads into personal e-mails based on their content.
>
> Clearly, Microsoft believes any risk of public-privacy concerns are
> worth incurring to fight a problem that has turned into an epidemic in
> some parts of the world.
>
> Microsoft has been fighting counterfeit efforts for years with limited
> success. It says that 35 per cent of the world's computers run
> counterfeit software and that piracy cost the global software industry
> $41-billion in 2004.


I don think it includes security updates.

If its figures are anything like the BSA me putting my finger up in the
air is more accurate.

While I believe in privacy I also think piracy is wrong. If the
bit-torrent stuff is anything to go by, it is a huge issue and unfair.

Myself I see this as a win for linux. As they clamp down people who
before had "free" stuff will now be forced to pay, do without, move to
OSS or other cheaper commercial software.

regards

Thing






 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
steve
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-27-2005
thingy wrote:

> Myself I see this as a win for linux. As they clamp down people who
> before had "free" stuff will now be forced to pay, do without, move to
> OSS or other cheaper commercial software.


Agreed.

I went to linux becasue I couldn't afford to put Windows on 9 home-built
PCs. It would have cost thousands to install full copies and then pay
for upgrades and anti-virus software subscriptions and spyware / adware
subscriptions......just to USE the damn thing.

Linux allows me all the function I want / need and I avoid all that
Windows-targeted hassle.
 
Reply With Quote
 
PAM.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-27-2005
"steve" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:42e716ab$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>

************************************************** **************************
***
>
>

http://www.globetechnology.com/servl...International/
>
> Bill Gates will be frisking you with a simple point and click
>
> By SIMON AVERY
> Tuesday, July 26, 2005 Updated at 5:17 AM EDT
> From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
>
> The next time you visit the website of Microsoft Corp. to download some
> software, be prepared to let the world's biggest software company have a
> look inside your computer.
>
> In a determined strike to quell the proliferation of counterfeit
> software, beginning today, Microsoft will require that all customers
> coming to its website for upgrades and other downloads submit their
> computers to an electronic frisking.


Phew. Thank Linux for Linspire.

The **** easiest Linux in the world


PAM.


 
Reply With Quote
 
Bruce Sinclair
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-27-2005
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Rob J <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 22:46:10 +1200, steve
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>thingy wrote:
>>
>>> Myself I see this as a win for linux. As they clamp down people who
>>> before had "free" stuff will now be forced to pay, do without, move to
>>> OSS or other cheaper commercial software.

>>
>>Agreed.
>>
>>I went to linux becasue I couldn't afford to put Windows on 9 home-built
>>PCs. It would have cost thousands to install full copies and then pay
>>for upgrades and anti-virus software subscriptions and spyware / adware
>>subscriptions......just to USE the damn thing.

>
>You are badly informed. You could buy OEM licenses for each PC for
>about $100 each.


And given linux is $0, why would you ?

Bruce

----------------------------------------
I believe you find life such a problem because you think there are the good
people and the bad people. You're wrong, of course. There are, always and
only, the bad people, but some of them are on opposite sides.

Lord Vetinari in Guards ! Guards ! - Terry Pratchett

Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
(if there were any)

 
Reply With Quote
 
Rob J
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-27-2005
On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 22:46:10 +1200, steve
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>thingy wrote:
>
>> Myself I see this as a win for linux. As they clamp down people who
>> before had "free" stuff will now be forced to pay, do without, move to
>> OSS or other cheaper commercial software.

>
>Agreed.
>
>I went to linux becasue I couldn't afford to put Windows on 9 home-built
>PCs. It would have cost thousands to install full copies and then pay
>for upgrades and anti-virus software subscriptions and spyware / adware
>subscriptions......just to USE the damn thing.


You are badly informed. You could buy OEM licenses for each PC for
about $100 each.


 
Reply With Quote
 
steve
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-27-2005
Rob J wrote:
> On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 22:46:10 +1200, steve
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>
>>thingy wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Myself I see this as a win for linux. As they clamp down people who
>>>before had "free" stuff will now be forced to pay, do without, move to
>>>OSS or other cheaper commercial software.

>>
>>Agreed.
>>
>>I went to linux becasue I couldn't afford to put Windows on 9 home-built
>>PCs. It would have cost thousands to install full copies and then pay
>>for upgrades and anti-virus software subscriptions and spyware / adware
>>subscriptions......just to USE the damn thing.

>
> You are badly informed. You could buy OEM licenses for each PC for
> about $100 each.


....and then add the annual anti-virus software subs.

9 x US$15 or more.

....and then do I pay for adware / spyware software, too?

....and then add the incessant use of my system by the vendors as an
in-your-face advertising hoarding to sell me software and services.

Still far more hassle and expense than I have to endure using Linux.

$900 for Windows is still many times the $130 I paid to put Xandros
Linux 3.0 on my systems (but one).





 
Reply With Quote
 
steve
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-27-2005
PAM. wrote:
> "steve" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:42e716ab$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>>

> ************************************************** **************************
> ***
>
>>

> http://www.globetechnology.com/servl...International/
>
>>Bill Gates will be frisking you with a simple point and click
>>
>>By SIMON AVERY
>>Tuesday, July 26, 2005 Updated at 5:17 AM EDT
>> From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
>>
>>The next time you visit the website of Microsoft Corp. to download some
>>software, be prepared to let the world's biggest software company have a
>>look inside your computer.
>>
>>In a determined strike to quell the proliferation of counterfeit
>>software, beginning today, Microsoft will require that all customers
>>coming to its website for upgrades and other downloads submit their
>>computers to an electronic frisking.

>
>
> Phew. Thank Linux for Linspire.
>
> The **** easiest Linux in the world
>
>
> PAM.


I have to try it. It's getting good reviews....though the update policy
is a bit more restrictive than Xandros'.....of so I have read (I do not
know first hand).

 
Reply With Quote
 
PAM.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-27-2005
"steve" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message

> I have to try it. It's getting good reviews....though the update policy
> is a bit more restrictive than Xandros'.....of so I have read (I do not
> know first hand).


UPDATE POLICY? (Bloody caps lock)

IIRC, you have to be a member of Click 'n' Run (CNR) Warehouse (US$50 per
annum) in order to get easy 1-click download an install on your PC and
updates to/new versions of the OS.
This US$50 is for support and ease of use/install and not for the software
you can get for free anywhere else....which you have to know how to install,
first.
Try the Live-CD to make sure it works with your current hardware
www.lfriendly.com for Linspire-friendly hardware (unsure if still updated)
www.lraiser.com for a graphic to see where and how many people are using
Linspire around the world.

I only promote it because I like it. I recieve no money from Linspire
Inc....unfortunately


PAM.


 
Reply With Quote
 
news.xtra.co.nz
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-28-2005

"steve" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:42e716ab$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> ************************************************** *****************************
>
> http://www.globetechnology.com/servl...International/
>
> Bill Gates will be frisking you with a simple point and click
>
> By SIMON AVERY
> Tuesday, July 26, 2005 Updated at 5:17 AM EDT
> From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
>
> The next time you visit the website of Microsoft Corp. to download some
> software, be prepared to let the world's biggest software company have a
> look inside your computer.
>
> In a determined strike to quell the proliferation of counterfeit software,
> beginning today, Microsoft will require that all customers coming to its
> website for upgrades and other downloads submit their computers to an
> electronic frisking.
>
> If you use one of the estimated hundred million PCs running pirated
> software, don't expect your upgrade. For Microsoft, the new policy is a
> stepped-up effort to combat the loss of billions of dollars worth of
> software sales every year to counterfeiters around the world. But in
> ramping up efforts to fight piracy, the Redmond, Wash.-based behemoth
> already finds itself fending off critics over privacy.
>
> .....
>
> The company will scan machines for a variety of information, including
> product keys or software authorization codes, operating-system version and
> details on the flow of data between the operating system and other
> hardware, such as printers.
>
> It is access to this information that particularly upsets the privacy
> advocates. Ms. Dixon says the only information Microsoft needs to fight
> piracy is the product key and the operating-system version, and she says
> that Microsoft will be able to identify users uniquely based on some of
> the information the company collects.
>
> "They are grabbing more information than they need to deter piracy," she
> said.
>
> If Microsoft deems a PC to be carrying contraband code, it won't allow a
> user to download Microsoft programs, with the exception of security
> patches. But the software company — which says that more than one in five
> U.S. computers runs a counterfeit version of its Windows product — is not
> just waving a stick. It is also offering a big carrot.
>
> Microsoft said it will give a free copy of its Windows XP to customers who
> unknowingly bought a counterfeit version of the operating system and who
> fill out a piracy report, provide proof of purchase and send Microsoft the
> counterfeit CDs.
>
> Customers who cannot provide proof of purchase but file a piracy report
> will receive a substantial discount on a legitimate version of the
> operating system, said Tim Prime, a product manager in the Windows client
> group at Microsoft Canada Co., a subsidiary of the U.S. company.
>
> Executives at Microsoft reject any suggestions that the move will
> antagonize customers with privacy concerns.
>
> "Customers want to know whether retailers have sold them genuine
> software," Mr. Prime said.
>
> More than 40 million users agreed to have their systems scanned in a
> 10-month trial that began last September in several countries. The
> participation rate amounted to 58 per cent of all visitors to the pilot
> website, far exceeding Microsoft's expectations of just 10 per cent, Mr.
> Prime said.
>
> Microsoft said no personal data will be collected during the validation
> process, and information will remain completely anonymous. The company
> said it commissioned TÜV-ITÖ, an independent German security auditor, to
> test how well its Windows Genuine Advantage program protects customers'
> data, and the firm concluded that Microsoft does not collect any personal
> information that would allow it to identify or contact a user.
>
> Seth Schoen, a staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a
> civil liberties group in San Francisco specializing in technology issues,
> agreed that Microsoft would not be able to identify customers personally
> through the program. But the data collected are unique to every customer,
> just as human fingerprints are unique, and the issue becomes how long the
> company holds onto the details and whether they could become personally
> identifying later on, he said.
>
> Technology companies have walked a fine line for years on the issue of
> collecting information from consumers' computers. Six years ago,
> RealNetworks Inc., whose software plays audio and video content on the
> Internet, released a patch for its RealJukebox program after the public
> learned the software was relaying personal information about users to the
> company.
>
> More recently, Google Inc. created a privacy backlash when it said its
> free e-mail service, Gmail, would include special software that inserts
> ads into personal e-mails based on their content.
>
> Clearly, Microsoft believes any risk of public-privacy concerns are worth
> incurring to fight a problem that has turned into an epidemic in some
> parts of the world.
>
> Microsoft has been fighting counterfeit efforts for years with limited
> success. It says that 35 per cent of the world's computers run counterfeit
> software and that piracy cost the global software industry $41-billion in
> 2004.


As usual, the few ruin it for the rest.

eg, why do we all have to buy locks and/or alarms for our houses - the lock
industry probably has made billions in profits over the years. Because, a
few people burgle houses so house owners take action to protect themselves
from financial loss. Microsoft are just protecting themselves from
financial loss too.


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
microsoft.public.certification, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcsa, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcad, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcsd loyola MCSE 4 11-15-2006 02:40 AM
microsoft.public.certification, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcsa, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcad, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcsd loyola Microsoft Certification 3 11-14-2006 05:18 PM
microsoft.public.certification, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcsa, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcad, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcsd loyola MCSD 3 11-14-2006 05:18 PM
microsoft.public.certification, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcsa, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcad, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcsd realexxams@yahoo.com Microsoft Certification 0 05-10-2006 02:35 PM
microsoft.public.dotnet.faqs,microsoft.public.dotnet.framework,microsoft.public.dotnet.framework.windowsforms,microsoft.public.dotnet.general,microsoft.public.dotnet.languages.vb Charles A. Lackman ASP .Net 1 12-08-2004 07:08 PM



Advertisments