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Intel quietly adds DRM to new chips

 
 
Bruce Sinclair
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      05-29-2005
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Richard <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>-=rjh=- wrote:
>
>> Suppose this DRM allows MS to tie a "lite" windows for home use tightly
>> into the hardware they sell it on and control the installation of any
>> other software. Most people just see they are getting a reliable, secure
>> and very cheap computer from a good and trusted brand name, and they'll
>> buy them. If subsidised by some kind of subscription model, they'll even
>> change them as often as they change cellphones. They'll sell by the
>> millions. If MS and Intel can get people away from being focussed on
>> processor speed, they'll even be able to downgrade hardware without
>> anyone noticing, and make hardware even cheaper.

>
>Cellphones havent being subsidised for a very long time. If anything, the local
>
>importers are making a killing on the markup on them, Look at the razr - $667
> at
>parallel improted, and a grand from a vodafone shop


... and $50 or free next year ?


Bruce


-------------------------------------
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it.
- George Bernard Shaw
Cynic, n: a blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be.
- Ambrose Bierce

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Bruce Sinclair
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      05-29-2005
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
(snip)
>No a Brave new world of Total control, like 1984..?
>
>Your Freedom is now totally gone.


No. Yours might be ... mine is not

Bruce


-------------------------------------
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it.
- George Bernard Shaw
Cynic, n: a blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be.
- Ambrose Bierce

Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
(if there were any)
 
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thing
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      05-29-2005
Peter wrote:
> Mutley wrote:
>
>>Microsoft and the entertainment industry's holy grail of controlling
>>copyright through the motherboard has moved a step closer with Intel
>>Corp. now embedding digital rights management within in its latest
>>dual-core processor Pentium D and accompanying 945 chipset.

>
>
> http://www.pcworld.com/reviews/artic...,121027,00.asp
>
> and at the same time, it can be used to force everyone to only use Micro$oft
> software - what a happy coincidence. Palladium is coming at last.
>
>
> Peter
>


Maybe, or maybe not, at present Windows is not written/optimised for
Itanium, only Linux is, so in effect virtually all Itanium's sold have
Linux OSes, Intel desperately needs linux and OSS to keep their crappy
"enterprise" chip alive.

Now take a huge slice of the server market, ie around 30% is Linux
Server, doing hardware CPUs that wont run OSS means you are handing 30%
+ to AMD and writing off Itanium, I dont think Intel can be that dumb.

regards

Thing











 
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thing
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      05-29-2005
Matthew Poole wrote:
> On Sun, 29 May 2005 19:05:37 +1200, someone purporting to be H.O.G doth
> scrawl:
>
>
>>On Sun, 29 May 2005 18:33:57 +1200, Matthew Poole <(E-Mail Removed)>
>>spoke these fine words:
>>

>
> *SNIP*
>
>>Do you really honestly believe that Intel would have written this crap
>>into the processors/chipsets if Microsoft hadn't already provided a
>>guarantee from AMD that they would do likewise?


yes, but there are huge issues if they try and enforce a MS only OS. Its
known as anti-comptetive and there are some nasty US laws (Sherman Act?)
on this. While DRM might fly in the USA, any attempt to lock it into a
MS only OS is going to cause serious legal issues for MS / Intel and
AMD. Outside the USA it is just not going to happen IMHO.

> Actually, yes, I do. Intel quite likely think that AMD's membership of
> the TPCA alliance is sufficient.
> People won't worry about DRM until such time as it breaks things. People
> don't like "protected" CDs because they lose the freedom to use them as
> they wish, and that backlash has kept them out of a number of stores -
> they're almost impossible to find in NZ, for example, just like you can't
> find region-encoded DVD players very easily.
> The consumer rules all. If consumers give something the thumbs-down, it
> will die, regardless of what the manufacturers might think. If nobody
> will buy it, it's too expensive to produce.
>
> Also, the US is not the world's only market. China is big, and growing
> fast enough that they're projected to overtake the US by the end of next
> year as the largest PC market on the planet. If the Chinese Government
> decrees that DRM chips are not to be sold, that'll be the end of DRM -
> producing two types of chips is too expensive, especially if other
> countries follow China's lead and say "you're already making them, so
> don't tell us it can't be done."
>
> DRM is a producer initiative. Consumers have said little because few
> understand the implications. Once they start to discover that it breaks
> things, they'll take notice, and it is a very foolish manufacturer who
> ignores their consumers - CPU IDs, anyone? How long did they last before
> they were disabled by default? They weren't even particularly dangerous,
> either, merely perceived negatively.
>


I agree, Asia alone (and then add Europe) will dwarf the US market,
making CPUs that only run Windows might give Bill Gates wet dreams but
any Asian/European Govn is going to have a screaming fit. The EU alone
would take Intel and MS apart in court, let alone China.....Then add
China wants to make its own CPUs and we have an independant source
becides AMD and Intel.

If things start to break and users find their applicatons no longer
work, how long do you think it would be before consumers inthe USA alone
would have a class action going?

The world has marched on in 10 years, we now have the Internet, while US
corps might like to think they can do what they want, what they want is
beoing a by-play and of no importance....

regards

Thing








 
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H.O.G
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      05-30-2005
On Mon, 30 May 2005 09:38:13 +1200, thing <(E-Mail Removed)> spoke
these fine words:

>
>Now take a huge slice of the server market, ie around 30% is Linux
>Server, doing hardware CPUs that wont run OSS means you are handing 30%
>+ to AMD and writing off Itanium, I dont think Intel can be that dumb.


Whilst it would be great if 30% of the server market were Linux
servers, that is simply not true.

Or are you just looking at Web Servers? Remember that Web Servers only
make up a small proportion of the actual server market.
 
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Bling-Bling
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-30-2005
On Mon, 30 May 2005 14:11:45 +1200, H.O.G wrote:

> On Mon, 30 May 2005 09:38:13 +1200, thing <(E-Mail Removed)> spoke these
> fine words:
>
>
>>Now take a huge slice of the server market, ie around 30% is Linux
>>Server, doing hardware CPUs that wont run OSS means you are handing 30% +
>>to AMD and writing off Itanium, I dont think Intel can be that dumb.

>
> Whilst it would be great if 30% of the server market were Linux servers,
> that is simply not true.
>
> Or are you just looking at Web Servers? Remember that Web Servers only
> make up a small proportion of the actual server market.


Yeah - then there are email servers (sendmail, postfix, etc), nntp
servers, X-servers, database servers, and all manner of servers that are
made with Open Source software - most of which are commonly implemented.


Bling Bling

--
"Linux and MySQL are going to keep chipping away at Micro$ofts' install base
and it is terrified. Why else would they keep spouting on about how awful
Linux is? If it was no threat they would just ignore and move on. I think the
same goes for a huge number of windows admins, they see a steep learning curve
for a whole new skill set on the horizon and are struggling to avoid it. Linux
and open source are the future, get used to it."

 
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FreedomChooser
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-30-2005
On Sun, 29 May 2005 15:03:11 +1200, Mutley
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Friday 27 May 2005 - 11:02
>
>
>Microsoft and the entertainment industry's holy grail of controlling
>copyright through the motherboard has moved a step closer with Intel
>Corp. now embedding digital rights management within in its latest
>dual-core processor Pentium D and accompanying 945 chipset.
>
>Guess there will be two types of Intel mother boards made now. One
>for the USA and one for the free world..
>
>AMD here we come..


How long before AMD adds it to its chips

 
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FreedomChooser
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-30-2005
On Sun, 29 May 2005 21:34:19 +1200, -=rjh=- <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Bling-Bling wrote:
>> On Sun, 29 May 2005 17:23:37 +1200, Peter wrote:
>>
>>
>>>>Microsoft and the entertainment industry's holy grail of controlling
>>>>copyright through the motherboard has moved a step closer with Intel
>>>>Corp. now embedding digital rights management within in its latest
>>>>dual-core processor Pentium D and accompanying 945 chipset.
>>>
>>>
>>>http://www.pcworld.com/reviews/artic...,121027,00.asp
>>>
>>>and at the same time, it can be used to force everyone to only use
>>>Micro$oft software - what a happy coincidence. Palladium is coming at
>>>last.

>>
>>
>> Who in their right mind would pay money for hardware and proprietary
>> closed-source software that were deliberately designed to prevent them
>> from doing whatever they want to do with their computer?
>>
>> What better reason do you need for walking away from Micro$oft and Intel?
>>

>Realistically, apart from a few people who read newsgroups and Slashdot,
>*most people won't care*. People will spend a lot of money on a
>cellphone and they never consider DRM issues, or even how the pricing
>model works (ie, a subscription subsidises the initial cost of the
>phone). MS Office activation seems to have settled into being accepted
>by the mainstream, and in fact is generally preferred despite there
>being perfectly good alternatives, why should DRM be any different?
>
>Suppose this DRM allows MS to tie a "lite" windows for home use tightly
>into the hardware they sell it on and control the installation of any
>other software. Most people just see they are getting a reliable, secure
>and very cheap computer from a good and trusted brand name, and they'll
>buy them. If subsidised by some kind of subscription model, they'll even
>change them as often as they change cellphones. They'll sell by the
>millions. If MS and Intel can get people away from being focussed on
>processor speed, they'll even be able to downgrade hardware without
>anyone noticing, and make hardware even cheaper.
>
>How many people know what speed processor their cellphone, Xbox or Ipod
>has in it? PCs will become just the same. Even now, people only have a
>vague idea that bigger numbers are better.


Well
At least you have an idea by now that the nerds dont rule the world

 
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H.O.G
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-30-2005
On Mon, 30 May 2005 19:29:12 +1200, Bling-Bling
<(E-Mail Removed)> spoke these fine words:

>On Mon, 30 May 2005 14:11:45 +1200, H.O.G wrote:
>
>> On Mon, 30 May 2005 09:38:13 +1200, thing <(E-Mail Removed)> spoke these
>> fine words:
>>
>>
>>>Now take a huge slice of the server market, ie around 30% is Linux
>>>Server, doing hardware CPUs that wont run OSS means you are handing 30% +
>>>to AMD and writing off Itanium, I dont think Intel can be that dumb.

>>
>> Whilst it would be great if 30% of the server market were Linux servers,
>> that is simply not true.
>>
>> Or are you just looking at Web Servers? Remember that Web Servers only
>> make up a small proportion of the actual server market.

>
>Yeah - then there are email servers (sendmail, postfix, etc), nntp
>servers, X-servers, database servers, and all manner of servers that are
>made with Open Source software - most of which are commonly implemented.
>

Look, I've got absolutely nothing against Linux - I use it myself
(best tool for the job in certain circumstances). However, there's
absolutely no benefit in making incorrect ascertions and implying they
are fact.

Linux machines do NOT make up 30% of the server market. Whilst it
would be great if that was the case, it is simply comical.
 
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Bling-Bling
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-30-2005
On Mon, 30 May 2005 20:12:13 +1200, H.O.G wrote:

>>Yeah - then there are email servers (sendmail, postfix, etc), nntp
>>servers, X-servers, database servers, and all manner of servers that are
>>made with Open Source software - most of which are commonly implemented.
>>

> Look, I've got absolutely nothing against Linux - I use it myself (best
> tool for the job in certain circumstances). However, there's absolutely no
> benefit in making incorrect ascertions and implying they are fact.
>
> Linux machines do NOT make up 30% of the server market. Whilst it would be
> great if that was the case, it is simply comical.


Are you suggesting that MySQL, Sendmail, etc, servers only run on Linux?


Bling Bling

--
"Linux and MySQL are going to keep chipping away at Micro$ofts' install base
and it is terrified. Why else would they keep spouting on about how awful
Linux is? If it was no threat they would just ignore and move on. I think the
same goes for a huge number of windows admins, they see a steep learning curve
for a whole new skill set on the horizon and are struggling to avoid it. Linux
and open source are the future, get used to it."

 
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