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Wireless Router as a Hub

 
 
bxb7668
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Posts: n/a
 
      04-01-2006
Is it possible to use a new Linksys WRT54GS wireless router as a hub?

After a few hours digging through Linksys tech support, google groups,
and the web, I think so but the instructions are as clear as mud.
Could somebody tell me if what I've dredged out of the muck will work?

Here is what I have. A DSL modem connects to Win 2003 SBS. The SBS
server is also our DHCP server. I have one PC on this network with a
static IP of 192.168.1.20 that I need to move to an office without a
network drop. I want to use the wireless to connect it.

Here's the instructions as I understand them ...
1) Unplug the PC from the network and plug it into one of the numbered
ports on the wireless router. The router is not plugged into the
network.

2) Using a browser, go to 192.168.1.1. When prompted for the username
and password, type in the default values.

3) In the router's web utility on the Setup tab, click the Disable
DHCP radio button.

4) For the Internet Connection Type, select Automatic Configuration -
DHCP.

5) Set the Router IP Address - Local IP Address to a value that is
part of the SBS subnet but outside the range it dynamically assigns,
i.e. 192.168.1.254.

6) Click Save Settings.

7) (This is where I think I understand the directions) Connect the
network cable coming from SBS to one of the numbered ports on the
wireless router, not to the Internet (I think that this is also called
the WAN) port.

Configure the SSID and wireless security settings on both the
router and the PC to match and configure the PC's wireless network
adaptor TCP/IP to use 192.168.1.20.

9) Unplug the cable between the PC and the router.

10) The PC should connect to the router and from there to the server.

Does this make sense?

Brian


 
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Doug Sherman [MVP]
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      04-01-2006
Yes - wireless routers are often configured this way because they are often
cheaper than access points.

Doug Sherman
MCSE, MCSA, MCP+I, MVP

"bxb7668" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:e#(E-Mail Removed)...
> Is it possible to use a new Linksys WRT54GS wireless router as a hub?
>
> After a few hours digging through Linksys tech support, google groups,
> and the web, I think so but the instructions are as clear as mud.
> Could somebody tell me if what I've dredged out of the muck will work?
>
> Here is what I have. A DSL modem connects to Win 2003 SBS. The SBS
> server is also our DHCP server. I have one PC on this network with a
> static IP of 192.168.1.20 that I need to move to an office without a
> network drop. I want to use the wireless to connect it.
>
> Here's the instructions as I understand them ...
> 1) Unplug the PC from the network and plug it into one of the numbered
> ports on the wireless router. The router is not plugged into the
> network.
>
> 2) Using a browser, go to 192.168.1.1. When prompted for the username
> and password, type in the default values.
>
> 3) In the router's web utility on the Setup tab, click the Disable
> DHCP radio button.
>
> 4) For the Internet Connection Type, select Automatic Configuration -
> DHCP.
>
> 5) Set the Router IP Address - Local IP Address to a value that is
> part of the SBS subnet but outside the range it dynamically assigns,
> i.e. 192.168.1.254.
>
> 6) Click Save Settings.
>
> 7) (This is where I think I understand the directions) Connect the
> network cable coming from SBS to one of the numbered ports on the
> wireless router, not to the Internet (I think that this is also called
> the WAN) port.
>
> Configure the SSID and wireless security settings on both the
> router and the PC to match and configure the PC's wireless network
> adaptor TCP/IP to use 192.168.1.20.
>
> 9) Unplug the cable between the PC and the router.
>
> 10) The PC should connect to the router and from there to the server.
>
> Does this make sense?
>
> Brian
>
>



 
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bxb7668
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-03-2006
Thank you for validating my process. It worked like a charm.

Brian

"Doug Sherman [MVP]" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Yes - wireless routers are often configured this way because they
> are often
> cheaper than access points.
>
> Doug Sherman
> MCSE, MCSA, MCP+I, MVP
>
> "bxb7668" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:e#(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Is it possible to use a new Linksys WRT54GS wireless router as a
>> hub?
>>
>> After a few hours digging through Linksys tech support, google
>> groups,
>> and the web, I think so but the instructions are as clear as mud.
>> Could somebody tell me if what I've dredged out of the muck will
>> work?
>>
>> Here is what I have. A DSL modem connects to Win 2003 SBS. The SBS
>> server is also our DHCP server. I have one PC on this network with
>> a
>> static IP of 192.168.1.20 that I need to move to an office without
>> a
>> network drop. I want to use the wireless to connect it.
>>
>> Here's the instructions as I understand them ...
>> 1) Unplug the PC from the network and plug it into one of the
>> numbered
>> ports on the wireless router. The router is not plugged into the
>> network.
>>
>> 2) Using a browser, go to 192.168.1.1. When prompted for the
>> username
>> and password, type in the default values.
>>
>> 3) In the router's web utility on the Setup tab, click the Disable
>> DHCP radio button.
>>
>> 4) For the Internet Connection Type, select Automatic
>> Configuration -
>> DHCP.
>>
>> 5) Set the Router IP Address - Local IP Address to a value that is
>> part of the SBS subnet but outside the range it dynamically
>> assigns,
>> i.e. 192.168.1.254.
>>
>> 6) Click Save Settings.
>>
>> 7) (This is where I think I understand the directions) Connect the
>> network cable coming from SBS to one of the numbered ports on the
>> wireless router, not to the Internet (I think that this is also
>> called
>> the WAN) port.
>>
>> Configure the SSID and wireless security settings on both the
>> router and the PC to match and configure the PC's wireless network
>> adaptor TCP/IP to use 192.168.1.20.
>>
>> 9) Unplug the cable between the PC and the router.
>>
>> 10) The PC should connect to the router and from there to the
>> server.
>>
>> Does this make sense?
>>
>> Brian
>>
>>

>
>



 
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seabrook seabrook is offline
Junior Member
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 1
 
      04-29-2008
Thanks for this advice -- it was exactly what I needed to get a Linksys Wireless-N Broadband Router to function as a temporary wireless access point for demonstrating a Chumby to my UNIX class. The campus network requires an interactive response (you have to agree to abide by the rules and regulations, etc.) before completing access so automatic connections from devices like the Chumby are right out. I wanted to demonstrate the small LInux OS the Chumby uses to my UNIX class so I borrowed the Router and configured it according to your instructions for a temporary WAP. The Chumby came up perfectly and got its IP address from the main network router. I had previously configured the Router as static 192.168.1.250, mask 255.255.255.0, gateway 192.168.1.1 and DNS 192.168.1.1, DHCP off and I plugged both the ethernet and the instructor's console into hub ports, NOT the Internet port. The Chumby got a 10.130.x.x IP and started working so I quickly checked the ipconfig (instructor consoles are Windoze 2K) and found that the lab network uses 10.130.x.x in that building instead of 192.168.x.x but it worked anyway. I took everything down after a 20-minute demo so as not to worry about outside access.
Dick S.
 
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