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Question: DDS3 tape drive installation

 
 
notme
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      04-24-2005
I've been give a SCSI DDS3 tape drive and a SCSI PCI card to connect
it to. I only have the drivers for the SCSI card.

Will the DDS3 tape drive require its own specfic software to run (the
unit is unbranded, with only a serial id on it), or can I install any
old tape backup software and expect it to "see" the drive on my
system. I already have copies of two year-old Veritas and Iomega tape
backup software.

Thanks for any advice from someone familiar with these drives.
 
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mark
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      04-24-2005
notme <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in news:a1rm61tt63euvsoml5fbu119e1sn9kp2ib@
4ax.com:

> I've been give a SCSI DDS3 tape drive and a SCSI PCI card to connect
> it to. I only have the drivers for the SCSI card.
>
> Will the DDS3 tape drive require its own specfic software to run (the
> unit is unbranded, with only a serial id on it), or can I install any
> old tape backup software and expect it to "see" the drive on my
> system. I already have copies of two year-old Veritas and Iomega tape
> backup software.
>
> Thanks for any advice from someone familiar with these drives.



With the last drives I tried (DDS2 and a few DLT drives), Win 2000/XP
picked them up fine using the supplied BAckup utility.

Cheers,
Mark
 
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Tim
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      04-24-2005
Ditto.

If you have any issues, post back with details on motherboard, SCSI card
make, model, and any other ID info on the tape drive - there is bound to be
something there - FCC id?

Probably the most likely thing that will go wrong is SCSI termination and
device ID - set the tape drive to say ID 0, make sure the cable has active
termination, and check the SCSI card settings for Auto Termination. IMHO,
tape drives are best on their own SCSI card - IE not shared at all. So you
seem to be safe there.

If the OS is Windows 2000 or later then the tape drive should appear
automatically since a SCSI tape drive is a SCSI tape drive. However often
there are manufacturer specific drivers - check device manager for the make
and model and then do a google for drivers. Have a ferret for any
manufacturer diagnostics and run that or a large test backup (some large
files, a lot of tiny files is a good mix) with Verify.

- Tim



"notme" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> I've been give a SCSI DDS3 tape drive and a SCSI PCI card to connect
> it to. I only have the drivers for the SCSI card.
>
> Will the DDS3 tape drive require its own specfic software to run (the
> unit is unbranded, with only a serial id on it), or can I install any
> old tape backup software and expect it to "see" the drive on my
> system. I already have copies of two year-old Veritas and Iomega tape
> backup software.
>
> Thanks for any advice from someone familiar with these drives.



 
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Me
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      04-24-2005
On Sun, 24 Apr 2005 22:02:54 +1200, notme <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

XP and both Win98 supported my DAT card...
just drop it in...
I have a VB script if you wish to automate backing up to tape...
good ole NTbackup.exe can be scripted...
\
 
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thing
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      04-25-2005
notme wrote:
> I've been give a SCSI DDS3 tape drive and a SCSI PCI card to connect
> it to. I only have the drivers for the SCSI card.
>
> Will the DDS3 tape drive require its own specfic software to run (the
> unit is unbranded, with only a serial id on it), or can I install any
> old tape backup software and expect it to "see" the drive on my
> system. I already have copies of two year-old Veritas and Iomega tape
> backup software.
>
> Thanks for any advice from someone familiar with these drives.


Depends on your software and not the hardware.

I have various backup units, a DLT, dds3 and a dds2, in linux they need
the scsi card modules and nothing else, I then run the tar command in a
script via a cronjob to do the backups, dead easy.

In the windows world I have found it more complex as you may well need
to buy software to give you a workable gui....depends on how
sophisitcated you need to be.

Software like Veritas etc might have come bundled with a different tape
unit and will not work with your "new" one, I found this out myself. I
have several pieces of legit Windows software that will not work with a
newer OS or different hardware that it was sold with.

Simple really install it and see if it works...

The DDS3 tapes also seem around $30 each so, have a look at your backup
volume you may well find that a DVD dual layer burner at $100 is better
value. Especially if you can software compress and your data is not
stuff like jpegs and mp3s in which case you may well approach the DDS3
in storage capability and your access will be far better.

regards

Thing





















 
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Tim
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      04-26-2005
A DDS3 tape is 12GB native, supposed 24GB compressed so how do you figure
that sitting around for 2 media swaps on DVD is better value for money?

Compared to DDS2, DVD is good value - if you can make the backup process as
reliable to DVD.

Oddly or not, given the reliability I have experienced with DDS (IE very
reliable), I would prefer it over DVD and its vulnerability to scratches.

2 cents.

- Tim





"thing" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> notme wrote:
>> I've been give a SCSI DDS3 tape drive and a SCSI PCI card to connect
>> it to. I only have the drivers for the SCSI card. Will the DDS3 tape
>> drive require its own specfic software to run (the
>> unit is unbranded, with only a serial id on it), or can I install any
>> old tape backup software and expect it to "see" the drive on my
>> system. I already have copies of two year-old Veritas and Iomega tape
>> backup software. Thanks for any advice from someone familiar with these
>> drives.

>
> Depends on your software and not the hardware.
>
> I have various backup units, a DLT, dds3 and a dds2, in linux they need
> the scsi card modules and nothing else, I then run the tar command in a
> script via a cronjob to do the backups, dead easy.
>
> In the windows world I have found it more complex as you may well need to
> buy software to give you a workable gui....depends on how sophisitcated
> you need to be.
>
> Software like Veritas etc might have come bundled with a different tape
> unit and will not work with your "new" one, I found this out myself. I
> have several pieces of legit Windows software that will not work with a
> newer OS or different hardware that it was sold with.
>
> Simple really install it and see if it works...
>
> The DDS3 tapes also seem around $30 each so, have a look at your backup
> volume you may well find that a DVD dual layer burner at $100 is better
> value. Especially if you can software compress and your data is not stuff
> like jpegs and mp3s in which case you may well approach the DDS3 in
> storage capability and your access will be far better.
>
> regards
>
> Thing
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>



 
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AD.
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Posts: n/a
 
      04-26-2005
On Tue, 26 Apr 2005 12:21:36 +1200, Tim wrote:

> A DDS3 tape is 12GB native, supposed 24GB compressed <snipped>


As a data point we used to get about 18-20GB on a DDS3 with hardware
compression.

> Compared to DDS2, DVD is good value - if you can make the backup process
> as reliable to DVD.
>
> Oddly or not, given the reliability I have experienced with DDS (IE very
> reliable), I would prefer it over DVD and its vulnerability to
> scratches.


One thing that turned me off DDS, was the drive alignment issues with
getting a lot of drives to read tapes created on other drives. It was
quite a headache, and gave me reservations about timely and (relatively)
easy disaster recovery.

--
Cheers
Anton

 
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Tim
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      04-26-2005
<snip>

> One thing that turned me off DDS, was the drive alignment issues with
> getting a lot of drives to read tapes created on other drives. It was
> quite a headache, and gave me reservations about timely and (relatively)
> easy disaster recovery.



I always specify when purchasing that the tape drives will not be accepted
if when tested they do not pass a compatibility test. Failure to get proper
azimuth alignment is um rather slack. There would be nothing worse than
finding this the hard way and finding the drive with the issue is the one on
the dead system...

My first exposure to a computer engineer in 1979 or so was to watch the poor
bod do an alignment test using an oscilliscope on a tape deck on a PDP
1//70. Such joy to watch - he had great trouble getting the picture on the
oscilloscope looking like the one in the manual. ..

- Tim


 
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