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Linux distribution recommendation

 
 
The Other Guy
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      03-31-2005
Hi,

Use FreeBSD would normally be the correct answer, but not for this one

I wish to port an C-based application to Linux, but don't want to
download a huge Linux installation just to be able to do so.

Can anyone recommend a very simple Linux distribution that ships with
the basic components to allow me to do development work?

I'm sure many of the Linux distributions out there only require disk 1
of their CD sets, but a mimimal install of 100-200MB would be
preferable. No need for X or any of that rubbish, just a command line
with [ba]sh will do.

Thanks,

The Other Guy
 
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Axle
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      03-31-2005
The Other Guy wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Use FreeBSD would normally be the correct answer, but not for this one
>
> I wish to port an C-based application to Linux, but don't want to
> download a huge Linux installation just to be able to do so.
>
> Can anyone recommend a very simple Linux distribution that ships with
> the basic components to allow me to do development work?
>
> I'm sure many of the Linux distributions out there only require disk 1
> of their CD sets, but a mimimal install of 100-200MB would be
> preferable. No need for X or any of that rubbish, just a command line
> with [ba]sh will do.
>
> Thanks,
>
> The Other Guy


Damn Small Linux
http://www.damnsmalllinux.org/
It turns into debian on a hard disk install, so you can apt get install
anything else you need.

Or just install debians base install with one of the netinst disks or
disk one
http://www.debian.org/distrib/netinst
 
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thing
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      03-31-2005
The Other Guy wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Use FreeBSD would normally be the correct answer, but not for this one
>
> I wish to port an C-based application to Linux, but don't want to
> download a huge Linux installation just to be able to do so.
>
> Can anyone recommend a very simple Linux distribution that ships with
> the basic components to allow me to do development work?
>
> I'm sure many of the Linux distributions out there only require disk 1
> of their CD sets, but a mimimal install of 100-200MB would be
> preferable. No need for X or any of that rubbish, just a command line
> with [ba]sh will do.
>
> Thanks,
>
> The Other Guy


A base install of Debian, about 200~250Meg. Then of course the tools you
are going to use need to be added to that. You probably also want a
small swap, so realistically even a small 250meg swap partition and 750
for / means 1 gig to make it usable.

RH minimal install is also around the 450~500 meg size, depends on what
or how you plan on packaging your output.

regards

Thing







 
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Chris Hope
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      03-31-2005
The Other Guy wrote:

> I wish to port an C-based application to Linux, but don't want to
> download a huge Linux installation just to be able to do so.
>
> Can anyone recommend a very simple Linux distribution that ships with
> the basic components to allow me to do development work?
>
> I'm sure many of the Linux distributions out there only require disk 1
> of their CD sets, but a mimimal install of 100-200MB would be
> preferable. No need for X or any of that rubbish, just a command line
> with [ba]sh will do.


As Axle pointed out there's Damn Small although I don't think it has a C
compiler included. Slax professional is a live cd which does. It's
based on Slackware. http://slax.linux-live.org/download.php

--
Chris Hope | www.electrictoolbox.com | www.linuxcdmall.co.nz
 
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Steve
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      03-31-2005
On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 14:12:28 +1200, The Other Guy wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Use FreeBSD would normally be the correct answer, but not for this one
>
> I wish to port an C-based application to Linux, but don't want to
> download a huge Linux installation just to be able to do so.
>
> Can anyone recommend a very simple Linux distribution that ships with
> the basic components to allow me to do development work?
>
> I'm sure many of the Linux distributions out there only require disk 1
> of their CD sets, but a mimimal install of 100-200MB would be
> preferable. No need for X or any of that rubbish, just a command line
> with [ba]sh will do.
>
> Thanks,
>
> The Other Guy


1. Use gnu as a cross compiler.
2. Use Knoppix
3. Pay me to do it (:

Steve

 
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Gordon
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      03-31-2005
On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 14:12:28 +1200, The Other Guy wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Use FreeBSD would normally be the correct answer, but not for this one
>
> I wish to port an C-based application to Linux, but don't want to
> download a huge Linux installation just to be able to do so.


Psst, your letter box might receive a CD or 5 if someone knew where it was.

>
> Can anyone recommend a very simple Linux distribution that ships with
> the basic components to allow me to do development work?
>
> I'm sure many of the Linux distributions out there only require disk 1
> of their CD sets, but a mimimal install of 100-200MB would be
> preferable. No need for X or any of that rubbish, just a command line
> with [ba]sh will do.
>

So you want the basics? Ms Penguin in the middle of molting.

I have installed Mandrake with out any GUI serveral times.

Puppy, and Google may know more. As a suggestion.

Now, I wonder if if are trolling, for you have been posting here awhile,
or was that in nz.general?
 
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The Other Guy
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      03-31-2005
Gordon wrote:
>>Use FreeBSD would normally be the correct answer, but not for this one
>>
>>I wish to port an C-based application to Linux, but don't want to
>>download a huge Linux installation just to be able to do so.

>
> Psst, your letter box might receive a CD or 5 if someone knew where it was.


Thanks for the offer. I don't really have a problem with downloading the
ISO files, I just don't see much point in downloading 4-5 CD images to
do something basic that can probably be done with some minimal Linux
distributions.

Downloading SLAX at the moment... there is a developer ISO that is only
250MB.

Last time I installed any Linux distribution I only required one CD, the
distributions I've looked at (being the mainstream distributions I'm
familiar with) either don't say if you need more than the first disk, or
say you need all of them...

E.g. Fedora...

"To install Fedora Core, download the DVD image or the four ISO images"

I need *four* images just to install???

I've used a few small Linux distributions (routers etc), but don't
recall any that shipped with GCC and other development tools.

>>Can anyone recommend a very simple Linux distribution that ships with
>>the basic components to allow me to do development work?
>>
>>I'm sure many of the Linux distributions out there only require disk 1
>>of their CD sets, but a mimimal install of 100-200MB would be
>>preferable. No need for X or any of that rubbish, just a command line
>>with [ba]sh will do.

>
> So you want the basics? Ms Penguin in the middle of molting.
>
> I have installed Mandrake with out any GUI serveral times.


Burried deep in the Mandrake documentation it appears you only require
the first disk, so I may give that a try if SLAX doesn't work out.

> Puppy, and Google may know more. As a suggestion.
>
> Now, I wonder if if are trolling, for you have been posting here awhile,
> or was that in nz.general?


Been posting here for years... my archives go back to 2001. I'm no
troll, but I will recommend *BSD over Linux if I think it is a better
choice

The Other Guy
 
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Dave Taylor
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      03-31-2005
The Other Guy <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in news:424ba7de$(E-Mail Removed):

>> Puppy, and Google may know more. As a suggestion.


Puppy linux is very very small. I don't know if it has compilers built in
though I am sure you could apt-get them or whatever it uses.

--
Ciao, Dave
 
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Lawrence DčOliveiro
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      03-31-2005
In article <424ba7de$(E-Mail Removed)>,
The Other Guy <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Last time I installed any Linux distribution I only required one CD, the
>distributions I've looked at (being the mainstream distributions I'm
>familiar with) either don't say if you need more than the first disk, or
>say you need all of them...
>
>E.g. Fedora...
>
>"To install Fedora Core, download the DVD image or the four ISO images"
>
>I need *four* images just to install???


Probably only if you want to install the full set of packages. The more
"mainstream"-orientated distributions would tend to count development
tools as being something only of interest to a minority. So they would
be relegated to some disc other than the first one of a multi-disc set.
I know the Mandrake 9.2 "Discovery Edition" that I got last year with my
Shuttle only had 2 CDs, not 3, and I had to go on-line and find a
Mandrake mirror to pull down the development tools.

In other words, if your idea of a minimal system includes development
tools, you may be happier with a more geek-oriented distribution. Debian
and Slackware spring to mind.
 
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AD.
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      03-31-2005
On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 19:22:34 +1200, The Other Guy wrote:

> E.g. Fedora...
>
> "To install Fedora Core, download the DVD image or the four ISO images"
>
> I need *four* images just to install???


Yep, your 'stripped down' Fedora system will install from disk 1, but the
3 other small development packages you need will be located on disks 2, 3,
and 4 respectively.

Murphy's law

Myself I'd use Debian. I'd just install the base system only, then apt-get
the individual packages needed.

--
Cheers
Anton

 
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