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KB v Kb

 
 
Roger Johnstone
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      02-28-2005
In <9LxUd.3312235$(E-Mail Removed)> MarkH wrote:
> http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)z (Bruce Sinclair) wrote in
> news:motUd.5035$(E-Mail Removed):
>
>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, "Shane (
>> aka froggy)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> degrees Kelvin?

>>
>> That would have a little degree sign by it
>>

>
> No degree sign, because there is no such thing as degrees Kelvin!
>
> 313 Kelvin is a temperature
> 20 degrees Celsius is a temperature


Picking at little nits here (but that's what this thread's about!).

It's 313 kelvins, not 313 Kelvin. SI units are always lower case,
although the abbreviation K is upper case since it's named after a
person, and if you have more than 1 kelvin then it's kelvins since it's
a unit not a scale.

--
Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand
http://vintageware.orcon.net.nz/
__________________________________________________ ______________________
No Silicon Heaven? Preposterous! Where would all the calculators go?

Kryten, from the Red Dwarf episode "The Last Day"
 
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MarkH
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      02-28-2005
Roger Johnstone <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in news:20050228194443808+1300
@News.Individual.NET:

> It's 313 kelvins, not 313 Kelvin. SI units are always lower case,
> although the abbreviation K is upper case since it's named after a
> person, and if you have more than 1 kelvin then it's kelvins since it's
> a unit not a scale.


Thanks for the correction. It has been a while since I did 7th form
physics (the last time that I needed to think about this), in fact it was
1985, so my memory of 20 years ago is not 100%.

Also we have been getting some temperatures pushing past 300 kelvins over
the last couple of weeks and that may have overheated my brain a little.



--
Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 20-Jan-05)
"There are 10 types of people, those that
understand binary and those that don't"

 
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A.D.
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      02-28-2005
Allistar wrote:
> Cliff wrote:
>
>
>>Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
>>I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
>>Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
>>I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots
>>of apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
>>Is this now the accepted usage?
>>I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.

>
>
> And to start the trollfest:
>
> Kb (kilobit) is technically 1000 bits.
> Kib (kibibit) is technically 1024 bits.
>
> When talking about computer storage most people use Kb when they mean Kib. I
> do as well, just what I'm used to I suppose.
>
> Companies use this difference (which is not insignificant) when selling
> hard-drives to make the number appear larger. I.e. they say 80Gb when they
> mean Gb, and most of us would assume they mean Gib.
>
> Allistar.


Aren't hard drives measured in "GB" not "Gb"?

*frown* 8 bits in a byte...
*frown* carry the 1....
*frown* dammit a 80Gb = 9.7GB approx... basterds, short changed!


A.D.
 
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SchoolTech
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      02-28-2005
In article <dXsUd.5023$(E-Mail Removed)> in nz.comp on Mon, 28
Feb 2005 12:44:07 +1300, Cliff <(E-Mail Removed)> says...
> Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
> I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
> Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
> I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots of
> apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
> Is this now the accepted usage?
> I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.


It's always been the way I have understood it.

Serial data transmission customarily uses Kbps as data is transmitted one
bit at a time, and that bit could be a data bit, or a start or stop bit.

Kib and KiB are also possible new variants thereof.
 
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SchoolTech
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      02-28-2005
In article <(E-Mail Removed)> in nz.comp on
Mon, 28 Feb 2005 18:34:29 +1300, Bruce Knox <(E-Mail Removed)>
says...
> On Mon, 28 Feb 2005 12:47:13 +1300, thing <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >Cliff wrote:
> >> Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
> >> I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
> >> Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
> >> I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots of
> >> apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
> >> Is this now the accepted usage?
> >> I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.
> >>
> >>

> >
> >
> >kb = kilobit, kB = kilobyte. Networks usually work in kb or Mb.
> >
> >eg 100Mbit/sec is typical LAN.
> >
> >regards
> >
> >Thing

> I have to disagree with your lower case k. Any modifier about a unit
> should be a capital and below a unit lower case. eg M=mega m=milli.


Actually, kilo has always been the exception to this rule from the
original French metric units.
 
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SchoolTech
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      02-28-2005
In article <cvuaqh$e6m$(E-Mail Removed)> in nz.comp on Mon, 28 Feb 2005
06:39:29 GMT, Matthew Poole <(E-Mail Removed)> says...
> In article <dXsUd.5023$(E-Mail Removed)>, "Cliff" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >Can someone please enlighten me as to current usage of KB and Kb
> >I had always thought that Kb meant Kilobit and KB Kilobyte.
> >Is this in fact right or have I been labouring under a misapprehension?
> >I could never really see the need to measure things in Kilobits and lots of
> >apps seem to use Kb to refer to Kilobytes.
> >Is this now the accepted usage?
> >I have no axe to grind either way. I would just like to know.
> >

> B (uppercase) refers to bytes. b (lowercase) refers to bits.
> Apparently it's acceptable to use Gb and Tb to refer to gigabytes and
> terabytes, respectively, but as we now move to network speeds that are
> measured in Gb/s it seems very stupid.
> Certainly for capacity measurements of K and M, the upper- and
> lowercase distinction matters.


How? kilo is abbreviated as a lowercase k, often incorrectly written as
uppercase.

Whereas for Mega and milli, there is a difference between M and m.
 
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SchoolTech
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      02-28-2005
> Allistar wrote:
> > Companies use this difference (which is not insignificant) when selling
> > hard-drives to make the number appear larger. I.e. they say 80Gb when they
> > mean Gb, and most of us would assume they mean Gib.


Are hard drives being made out of plaster these days?
 
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Bruce Sinclair
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      02-28-2005
In article <9LxUd.3312235$(E-Mail Removed)>, MarkH <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>(E-Mail Removed) (Bruce Sinclair) wrote in
>news:motUd.5035$(E-Mail Removed):
>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, "Shane (aka
>> froggy)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> degrees Kelvin?

>>
>> That would have a little degree sign by it

>
>No degree sign, because there is no such thing as degrees Kelvin!
>
>313 Kelvin is a temperature
>20 degrees Celsius is a temperature


I have seen degrees used for both and both used alone. IME, all are
acceptable.


Bruce


-----------------------------------------------------------------------
It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to
think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyones fault.
If it was Us, what did that make Me ? After all, Im one of Us. I must be.
Ive certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No-one ever thinks
of themselves as one of Them. Were always one of Us. Its Them that do
the bad things. <=> Terry Pratchett. Jingo.

Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
(if there were any)
 
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Bruce Sinclair
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      02-28-2005
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Roger Johnstone <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>In <9LxUd.3312235$(E-Mail Removed)> MarkH wrote:
>> (E-Mail Removed)z (Bruce Sinclair) wrote in
>> news:motUd.5035$(E-Mail Removed):
>>
>>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, "Shane (
>>> aka froggy)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>> degrees Kelvin?
>>>
>>> That would have a little degree sign by it
>>>

>>
>> No degree sign, because there is no such thing as degrees Kelvin!
>>
>> 313 Kelvin is a temperature
>> 20 degrees Celsius is a temperature

>
>Picking at little nits here (but that's what this thread's about!).
>
>It's 313 kelvins, not 313 Kelvin. SI units are always lower case,
>although the abbreviation K is upper case since it's named after a
>person, and if you have more than 1 kelvin then it's kelvins since it's
>a unit not a scale.


I disagree. But that's the great thing about standards ... there are so many
to choose from

Bruce


-----------------------------------------------------------------------
It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to
think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyones fault.
If it was Us, what did that make Me ? After all, Im one of Us. I must be.
Ive certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No-one ever thinks
of themselves as one of Them. Were always one of Us. Its Them that do
the bad things. <=> Terry Pratchett. Jingo.

Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
(if there were any)
 
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MarkH
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-28-2005
(E-Mail Removed)z (Bruce Sinclair) wrote in
news:3CKUd.5208$(E-Mail Removed):

> In article <9LxUd.3312235$(E-Mail Removed)>, MarkH
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>No degree sign, because there is no such thing as degrees Kelvin!
>>
>>313 Kelvin is a temperature
>>20 degrees Celsius is a temperature

>
> I have seen degrees used for both and both used alone. IME, all are
> acceptable.


Only if acceptable is another word for wrong. The degree thing is used for
Celsius/centigrade and Fahrenheit which are both relative scales, the
Kelvin scale is an absolute one and it was decided long ago by the ISO
standards people that a temperature in kelvins should not use degrees.




--
Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 20-Jan-05)
"There are 10 types of people, those that
understand binary and those that don't"

 
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