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Just another kernel upgrade...

 
 
Lawrence DčOliveiro
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-03-2005
I've done a few Linux kernel upgrades, but so far none that successfully
involved a third-party module.

I thought I'd bite the bullet and try putting the newer 2.6.5-7.111.19
kernel on the SuSE 9.1 installation on my Shuttle. The complication here
is that it has an NVidia card, which requires a module from NVidia in
order for the 3D acceleration to work.

I did the basic kernel upgrade, which went OK, but after the reboot, my
X server failed to start (couldn't load a driver for the graphics card).
I also made sure to install the corresponding kernel-source and
kernel-syms RPMs (and also made sure I kept the option to reboot with
the old kernel), but I was stuck with character-mode consoles for now.

I downloaded the NVIDIA-Linux-x86-1.0-6111-pkg1.run file (the latest
version I could find at the NVidia site) and invoked it with the "sh"
command as per the instructions. It only had a prebuilt module for the
older 2.6.4-52 kernel, so it asked me if I wanted it to build one for my
newer kernel. I said yes.

At this point, it threw up an error message, saying it couldn't find a
file called include/linux/kernel.h by following the symlink from
/lib/modules/2.6.5-7.111.19-default/build, and so it had to abandon the
installation. This smelled to me like a bug on NVidia's part, since
kernel.h is part of the standard sources, whereas the build directory
contains files which are generated dynamically by the kernel
configuration system. So they were looking in the wrong place.

Luckily, the NVidia package gives you the option to extract all the
files in it without installing anything, in case you want to mess about
with them. I did this and had a look, and found that it had put the
module sources in a subdirectory called usr/src/nv, complete with a
makefile. I went into that directory and typed "make". Nothing happened.

Hmm... had a look in the makefile. Ah, found a likely-looking target
named "default". So I typed "make default". Yup, a whole bunch of
compiler commands go whizzing past. Seconds later, I have a look ... and
I have a new file called nvidia.ko. Looks good!

Had a look in /lib/modules/2.6.4-52-default, and the module for the old
version was in kernel/drivers/video. So I copied the new one to the
corresponding location under /lib/modules/2.6.5-7.111.19-default.
Rebooted ... crossed my fingers ...

The usual boot messages come up. The "NVIDIA" logo flashes up, then the
KDE watch cursor appears, and a few seconds later I have my usual GUI
login screen. Success!

It's all learning, and the next time I'll get paid for doing it.
 
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NOSPAM@NOSPAM.invalid.com
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-03-2005
On Mon, 03 Jan 2005 20:57:23 +1300, Lawrence DÂčOliveiro wrote:

> The usual boot messages come up. The "NVIDIA" logo flashes up, then the
> KDE watch cursor appears, and a few seconds later I have my usual GUI
> login screen. Success!


Congratulations! )


Divine

--
"A life? Sounds great! Do you know where I could download one?"

 
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NOSPAM@NOSPAM.invalid.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-03-2005
On Mon, 03 Jan 2005 20:57:23 +1300, Lawrence DÂčOliveiro wrote:

> The usual boot messages come up. The "NVIDIA" logo flashes up, then the
> KDE watch cursor appears, and a few seconds later I have my usual GUI
> login screen. Success!


Congratulations! )


Divine

--
"A life? Sounds great! Do you know where I could download one?"

 
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Steve
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-03-2005
Lawrence DčOliveiro wrote:
> I've done a few Linux kernel upgrades, but so far none that successfully
> involved a third-party module.
>
> I thought I'd bite the bullet and try putting the newer 2.6.5-7.111.19
> kernel on the SuSE 9.1 installation on my Shuttle. The complication here
> is that it has an NVidia card, which requires a module from NVidia in
> order for the 3D acceleration to work.
>
> I did the basic kernel upgrade, which went OK, but after the reboot, my
> X server failed to start (couldn't load a driver for the graphics card).
> I also made sure to install the corresponding kernel-source and
> kernel-syms RPMs (and also made sure I kept the option to reboot with
> the old kernel), but I was stuck with character-mode consoles for now.
>
> I downloaded the NVIDIA-Linux-x86-1.0-6111-pkg1.run file (the latest
> version I could find at the NVidia site) and invoked it with the "sh"
> command as per the instructions. It only had a prebuilt module for the
> older 2.6.4-52 kernel, so it asked me if I wanted it to build one for my
> newer kernel. I said yes.
>
> At this point, it threw up an error message, saying it couldn't find a
> file called include/linux/kernel.h by following the symlink from
> /lib/modules/2.6.5-7.111.19-default/build, and so it had to abandon the
> installation. This smelled to me like a bug on NVidia's part, since
> kernel.h is part of the standard sources, whereas the build directory
> contains files which are generated dynamically by the kernel
> configuration system. So they were looking in the wrong place.
>
> Luckily, the NVidia package gives you the option to extract all the
> files in it without installing anything, in case you want to mess about
> with them. I did this and had a look, and found that it had put the
> module sources in a subdirectory called usr/src/nv, complete with a
> makefile. I went into that directory and typed "make". Nothing happened.
>
> Hmm... had a look in the makefile. Ah, found a likely-looking target
> named "default". So I typed "make default". Yup, a whole bunch of
> compiler commands go whizzing past. Seconds later, I have a look ... and
> I have a new file called nvidia.ko. Looks good!
>
> Had a look in /lib/modules/2.6.4-52-default, and the module for the old
> version was in kernel/drivers/video. So I copied the new one to the
> corresponding location under /lib/modules/2.6.5-7.111.19-default.
> Rebooted ... crossed my fingers ...
>
> The usual boot messages come up. The "NVIDIA" logo flashes up, then the
> KDE watch cursor appears, and a few seconds later I have my usual GUI
> login screen. Success!
>
> It's all learning, and the next time I'll get paid for doing it.



Hmmm...
1. Nivida drivers version 6111 is old. Current is 6629. See
http://www.nvidia.com/object/linux_d..._1.0-6629.html and follow.

2. Kernel version 2.6.5 is old. Current is 2.6.10. See
http://www.kernel.org/

3. You need to install the new kernel headers as well as the new kernel
to get it to build. As documented.

4. Were you connected to the internet? It would have downloaded a
running module for a kernel that old if you'd been installing a current
version.

Paid for not reading the documentation and attempting to install old
versions of both kernel and nvidia drivers... not by me, that's for sure.

Steve.
 
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Steve
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-03-2005
Lawrence DčOliveiro wrote:
> I've done a few Linux kernel upgrades, but so far none that successfully
> involved a third-party module.
>
> I thought I'd bite the bullet and try putting the newer 2.6.5-7.111.19
> kernel on the SuSE 9.1 installation on my Shuttle. The complication here
> is that it has an NVidia card, which requires a module from NVidia in
> order for the 3D acceleration to work.
>
> I did the basic kernel upgrade, which went OK, but after the reboot, my
> X server failed to start (couldn't load a driver for the graphics card).
> I also made sure to install the corresponding kernel-source and
> kernel-syms RPMs (and also made sure I kept the option to reboot with
> the old kernel), but I was stuck with character-mode consoles for now.
>
> I downloaded the NVIDIA-Linux-x86-1.0-6111-pkg1.run file (the latest
> version I could find at the NVidia site) and invoked it with the "sh"
> command as per the instructions. It only had a prebuilt module for the
> older 2.6.4-52 kernel, so it asked me if I wanted it to build one for my
> newer kernel. I said yes.
>
> At this point, it threw up an error message, saying it couldn't find a
> file called include/linux/kernel.h by following the symlink from
> /lib/modules/2.6.5-7.111.19-default/build, and so it had to abandon the
> installation. This smelled to me like a bug on NVidia's part, since
> kernel.h is part of the standard sources, whereas the build directory
> contains files which are generated dynamically by the kernel
> configuration system. So they were looking in the wrong place.
>
> Luckily, the NVidia package gives you the option to extract all the
> files in it without installing anything, in case you want to mess about
> with them. I did this and had a look, and found that it had put the
> module sources in a subdirectory called usr/src/nv, complete with a
> makefile. I went into that directory and typed "make". Nothing happened.
>
> Hmm... had a look in the makefile. Ah, found a likely-looking target
> named "default". So I typed "make default". Yup, a whole bunch of
> compiler commands go whizzing past. Seconds later, I have a look ... and
> I have a new file called nvidia.ko. Looks good!
>
> Had a look in /lib/modules/2.6.4-52-default, and the module for the old
> version was in kernel/drivers/video. So I copied the new one to the
> corresponding location under /lib/modules/2.6.5-7.111.19-default.
> Rebooted ... crossed my fingers ...
>
> The usual boot messages come up. The "NVIDIA" logo flashes up, then the
> KDE watch cursor appears, and a few seconds later I have my usual GUI
> login screen. Success!
>
> It's all learning, and the next time I'll get paid for doing it.



Hmmm...
1. Nivida drivers version 6111 is old. Current is 6629. See
http://www.nvidia.com/object/linux_d..._1.0-6629.html and follow.

2. Kernel version 2.6.5 is old. Current is 2.6.10. See
http://www.kernel.org/

3. You need to install the new kernel headers as well as the new kernel
to get it to build. As documented.

4. Were you connected to the internet? It would have downloaded a
running module for a kernel that old if you'd been installing a current
version.

Paid for not reading the documentation and attempting to install old
versions of both kernel and nvidia drivers... not by me, that's for sure.

Steve.
 
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Lawrence DčOliveiro
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-03-2005
In article <crb3pg$k1l$(E-Mail Removed)>, Steve <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>4. Were you connected to the internet?


Yes.

>It would have downloaded a
>running module for a kernel that old if you'd been installing a current
>version.


No.
 
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steve
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-04-2005
Lawrence DčOliveiro wrote:

> The usual boot messages come up. The "NVIDIA" logo flashes up, then the
> KDE watch cursor appears, and a few seconds later I have my usual GUI
> login screen. Success!
>
> It's all learning, and the next time I'll get paid for doing it.


Well done.

I rarely have trouble adding the Nvidia support after a kernel compile, but
if I ever do I'll try and remember your post.
 
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