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End of an era for IBM

 
 
Roger_Nickel
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      12-03-2004
According to the NY Times, IBM has its PC business on the market.
"..The sale, likely to be in the $1 billion to $2 billion range, is
expected to include the entire range of desktop, laptop and notebook
computers made by I.B.M...."
 
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Patrick Dunford
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      12-03-2004
In article <(E-Mail Removed)> in nz.comp on Sat, 04 Dec 2004
09:23:20 +1300, Roger_Nickel <(E-Mail Removed)> says...
> According to the NY Times, IBM has its PC business on the market.
> "..The sale, likely to be in the $1 billion to $2 billion range, is
> expected to include the entire range of desktop, laptop and notebook
> computers made by I.B.M...."


IBM got out of domestic desktops here years ago, and have focused on
corporate market ever since.

Really this is just an extension of the intense competition that saw the
demise of large scale local PC assembly in NZ and other western
countries, and which has forced Compaq, Digital and HP to amalgamate
their PC operations.

 
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impossible
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      12-03-2004
"Roger_Nickel" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> According to the NY Times, IBM has its PC business on the market.
> "..The sale, likely to be in the $1 billion to $2 billion range, is
> expected to include the entire range of desktop, laptop and notebook
> computers made by I.B.M...."


And it sounds like HP won't be far behind.


 
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impossible
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      12-03-2004
"Patrick Dunford" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed). nz...
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)> in nz.comp on Sat, 04 Dec 2004
> 09:23:20 +1300, Roger_Nickel <(E-Mail Removed)> says...
>> According to the NY Times, IBM has its PC business on the market.
>> "..The sale, likely to be in the $1 billion to $2 billion range, is
>> expected to include the entire range of desktop, laptop and notebook
>> computers made by I.B.M...."

>
> IBM got out of domestic desktops here years ago, and have focused on
> corporate market ever since.


This is a little different. IBM is selling off its entire pc business now.
Granted, the actually manufacturing has been out-sourced for quite a whiel
now. But this is still a big move.
>
> Really this is just an extension of the intense competition that saw the
> demise of large scale local PC assembly in NZ and other western
> countries, and which has forced Compaq, Digital and HP to amalgamate
> their PC operations.
>


Yes, if you didn't think before that pcs and notebooks had been throughly
commodified, this should end all doubts. But have a read of the article at
http://www.nytimes.com, because this looks like more than simply an
"extension" of IBM's old business plan to me. The company has apparently
decided that the high-end IT development and service side of things should
be its exclusive focus, and its willing to bet what amounts to 20% or so of
its current annual revenue to prove that strategy.


 
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Roger Johnstone
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      12-04-2004
In <(E-Mail Removed)> Roger_Nickel wrote:
> According to the NY Times, IBM has its PC business on the market.
> "..The sale, likely to be in the $1 billion to $2 billion range, is
> expected to include the entire range of desktop, laptop and notebook
> computers made by I.B.M...."


*snort* Remember when people predicted IBM would force Apple out of the
personal computer business? The irony is that even though IBM _invented_
the IBM PC, for a long time now they've just been cloning the same 1984
PC/AT as all the other clone manufacturers have, with the occasional
extention from Microsoft or Intel.

Has IBM produced _anything_ that's been adopted by the PC industry since
the PS/2 line introduced VGA, PS/2 mouse ports and 1.4MB floppy drives
in 1987?

--
Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand
http://vintageware.orcon.net.nz/
__________________________________________________ ______________________
No Silicon Heaven? Preposterous! Where would all the calculators go?

Kryten, from the Red Dwarf episode "The Last Day"
 
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Gordon
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      12-04-2004
On Sat, 04 Dec 2004 03:33:16 +0000, Roger Johnstone wrote:

> Has IBM produced _anything_ that's been adopted by the PC industry since
> the PS/2 line introduced VGA, PS/2 mouse ports and 1.4MB floppy drives
> in 1987?


Does it matter? They started it all, a one start wonder ?

 
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Gordon
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      12-04-2004
On Fri, 03 Dec 2004 17:03:16 -0500, impossible wrote:

> Yes, if you didn't think before that pcs and notebooks had been throughly
> commodified, this should end all doubts. But have a read of the article at
> http://www.nytimes.com, because this looks like more than simply an
> "extension" of IBM's old business plan to me. The company has apparently
> decided that the high-end IT development and service side of things should
> be its exclusive focus, and its willing to bet what amounts to 20% or so of
> its current annual revenue to prove that strategy.


International Business Machines, or IBM

 
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Roger Johnstone
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      12-04-2004
In <(E-Mail Removed)> Gordon wrote:
> On Sat, 04 Dec 2004 03:33:16 +0000, Roger Johnstone wrote:
>
>> Has IBM produced _anything_ that's been adopted by the PC industry
>> since the PS/2 line introduced VGA, PS/2 mouse ports and 1.4MB
>> floppy drives in 1987?

>
> Does it matter? They started it all, a one start wonder ?


It might matter to a customer looking for a reason to buy, say, a
computer from IBM instead of from Dell, Toshiba, Acer, Hewlett-Packard,
NEC, or any of the other IBM PC clone manufacturers. If you don't have
something to offer that the others don't then you're just selling
commodity widgets, and the only way to differentiate yourself is with
pricing or support, or spending lots on advertising.

--
Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand
http://vintageware.orcon.net.nz/
__________________________________________________ ______________________
No Silicon Heaven? Preposterous! Where would all the calculators go?

Kryten, from the Red Dwarf episode "The Last Day"
 
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Enkidu
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      12-04-2004
On 4 Dec 2004 03:33:16 GMT, Roger Johnstone <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:
>
>*snort* Remember when people predicted IBM would force Apple out of the
>personal computer business? The irony is that even though IBM _invented_
>the IBM PC, for a long time now they've just been cloning the same 1984
>PC/AT as all the other clone manufacturers have, with the occasional
>extention from Microsoft or Intel.
>

That's because it is a damn good and flexible design. And it's had
good marketing I admit.

And if anyone brings up VHS/Betamax, I know that the Beta was
technically superior, but VHS is/was not that bad either.

Cheers,

Cliff
--

These twin-CPU hyperthreading computers are really
great! We can wait ten to a hundred times faster
these days.
 
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Roger Johnstone
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      12-04-2004
In <(E-Mail Removed)> Enkidu wrote:
> On 4 Dec 2004 03:33:16 GMT, Roger Johnstone <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>>
>>*snort* Remember when people predicted IBM would force Apple out of
>>the personal computer business? The irony is that even though IBM _
>>invented_ the IBM PC, for a long time now they've just been cloning
>>the same 1984 PC/AT as all the other clone manufacturers have, with
>>the occasional extention from Microsoft or Intel.

>
> That's because it is a damn good and flexible design. And it's had
> good marketing I admit.


Hmm. Even in 1981 the IBM PC design was considered ho-hum. I mean it was
OK compared to the stuff around at the time, and it was one of the first
PCs with a 16-bit CPU and >64KB address space which made it interesting,
but it was also a straight-out-of-the-book design. Literally. Basically
someone took the Intel "How to build a computer" manual, and built a
computer. Not that there's anything wrong with that approach, I just
wouldn't call it damn good.

The problem with the PC evolution is that just a few years after it was
started it was removed from IBM's hands, and now it's very difficult to
fix all the things that are wrong with it, since it's almost impossible
to get everyone to agree to do it. Why is it they can upgrade a platform
from a 16-bit CPU to a 64-bit CPU, go from 8-bit slots to 64-bit,
increase the CPU clock speed a thousand fold, land a man on the moon,
but they can't get rid of freakin' IRQ conflicts! (Yes I know most
people don't experience them now, but they still occur, even with a PCI
bus and Windows Plug'n Play. A friend was having problems with an extra
USB controller card in his PC last week) It's 2004, by now you shouldn't
even know what an IRQ is, let alone have the least desire to find out
how many you have or what's using them.

> And if anyone brings up VHS/Betamax, I know that the Beta was
> technically superior, but VHS is/was not that bad either.


Well now that you've brought it up... ;o)

Beta was technically superior...in the 1970s. But the difference was too
small for most people to care about and since then VHS recorders have
improved markedly. Better picture, hi-fi stereo, and if you want to pay
enough S-VHS or D-VHS. (Beta was improved too, but it was no longer
competing against VHS). Not that it matters much now since both Beta and
VHS are on their way out.

--
Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand
http://vintageware.orcon.net.nz/
__________________________________________________ ______________________
No Silicon Heaven? Preposterous! Where would all the calculators go?

Kryten, from the Red Dwarf episode "The Last Day"
 
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