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Linux printing

 
 
Dumbkiwi
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      06-14-2004
On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 11:27:42 +1200, brundlefly wrote:

>
> "Allistar" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:qa5zc.2281$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>
>> Really?
>>
>> A large part of the open source psyche is to develop something you will

> find
>> useful, with no desires to get the rest of the world to use your tool.

>
> Why would you provide the source code then ?


So that someone else will audit/improve your code, for your benefit. You
contribute some code, and 10 others contribute more code. You get a
payback on your investment. For example, I wrote a simple applet to
display weather on a kde desktop. A number of people have contributed
code to this, so that now it's a pretty cool piece of software. I started
with a simple, and reasonably crappy applet, and got a pretty useful one -
and learnt a lot in the process. This is an economic exchange of value.
It may not invole cold hard cash, but it seems to work. Look at the
apache project. A bunch of web developers get together to write one web
server, rather than each building and maintaining their own. Each
contributes a bit, and in return, get the best web server software on the
"market".

Matt

--
Regards Matt

 
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brundlefly
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      06-14-2004
Dumbkiwi wrote:

> On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 11:27:42 +1200, brundlefly wrote:
>
>>
>> "Allistar" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:qa5zc.2281$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>
>>> Really?
>>>
>>> A large part of the open source psyche is to develop something you will

>> find
>>> useful, with no desires to get the rest of the world to use your tool.

>>
>> Why would you provide the source code then ?

>
> So that someone else will audit/improve your code, for your benefit. You
> contribute some code, and 10 others contribute more code. You get a
> payback on your investment. For example, I wrote a simple applet to
> display weather on a kde desktop. A number of people have contributed
> code to this, so that now it's a pretty cool piece of software. I started
> with a simple, and reasonably crappy applet, and got a pretty useful one -
> and learnt a lot in the process. This is an economic exchange of value.
> It may not invole cold hard cash, but it seems to work. Look at the
> apache project. A bunch of web developers get together to write one web
> server, rather than each building and maintaining their own. Each
> contributes a bit, and in return, get the best web server software on the
> "market".
>
> Matt
>


The question was a bit rhetorical, but you are bang on with your response.
The apache project has a really interesting history
http://httpd.apache.org/ABOUT_APACHE.html
A small group of developers got together to salvage the NCSA httpd daemon
and pooled all their patches and released a "patchy" webserver.
What would be the global economic benefit sum of apache ?
Why wouldn't they want the rest of the world to use it ?
 
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Divine
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      06-14-2004
On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 18:57:04 +1200, AD. wrote:

> People write proof of concept viruses all the time that don't spread
> anywhere - how do you think the virus scanners get umpteen thousand
> signatures? Where are the Linux examples? Just think of the notoriety for
> writing the first one, surely someone is trying?


I believe that viruses DO ALREADY exist for Linux - in the laboratory.
However, NONE have survived in the wild.


Divine

--
"A life? Sounds great! Do you know where I could download one?"

 
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Divine
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      06-14-2004
On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 18:58:13 +1200, AD. wrote:

> I'd say the bigger reason there are no Linux viruses circulating is that
> they wouldn't be able to get started easily. You'd need a level of social
> engineering to get people to enable executable bits etc.


Yeah - good eh! )

*nix will refuse to execute something unless you explicitly say it's
executable.

Windows, OTOH, will try to execute any old thing so long as it knows what
should execute it.


Divine

--
"Microsoft don't need any moral right to be a hypocrite. It's an oxymoron.
They will do what they can get away with. Of course this makes it difficult
for their advocates to occupy any high moral ground."

 
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Divine
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      06-14-2004
On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 20:43:57 +1200, Dumbkiwi wrote:

> Please tell me what end user software requires command line knowledge.


RPM - if you're wanting to do more than a default install.

also, aumix.

also ps & top - especially if you're wanting to kill a stray process.


Divine

--
Bruce Schneier: "Honestly, security experts don't pick on Microsoft because
we have some fundamental dislike for the company. Indeed, Microsoft's poor
products are one of the reasons we're in business. We pick on them because
they've done more to harm Internet security than anyone else, because they
repeatedly lie to the public about their products' security, and because
they do everything they can to convince people that the problems lie anywhere
but inside Microsoft. Microsoft treats security vulnerabilities as public
relations problems. Until that changes, expect more of this kind of nonsense
from Microsoft and its products."

 
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Divine
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      06-14-2004
On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 20:47:29 +1200, Dumbkiwi wrote:

>>> You installed one designed for computer gurus and complain when you
>>> get stuck, Suse is more designed for users like yourself, a mate of
>>> mine installed Suse linux completely fine without any prior knowledge
>>> of linux and no manual, the only thing he got wrong was swap which he
>>> would not have if I had remember to also lend him the manual.

>>
>> Bet you it wouldn't run on my computer, I have a pentium 133

>
> How's XP doing on your computer?


Who would put a modern GUI onto a computer as slow as a P133?

Come to think of it, there are GUIs for Linux which would work well on a
P133. )


Divine

--
"Microsoft don't need any moral right to be a hypocrite. It's an oxymoron.
They will do what they can get away with. Of course this makes it difficult
for their advocates to occupy any high moral ground."

 
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Divine
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      06-14-2004
On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 21:02:26 +1200, Dumbkiwi wrote:

> I wrote a simple applet to
> display weather on a kde desktop. A number of people have contributed
> code to this, so that now it's a pretty cool piece of software. I
> started with a simple, and reasonably crappy applet, and got a pretty
> useful one - and learnt a lot in the process.


You wrote that applet???

Cool! Thanks for writing it - appreciated.

I also like the TeaTimer applet.


Divine

--
Bruce Schneier: "Honestly, security experts don't pick on Microsoft because
we have some fundamental dislike for the company. Indeed, Microsoft's poor
products are one of the reasons we're in business. We pick on them because
they've done more to harm Internet security than anyone else, because they
repeatedly lie to the public about their products' security, and because
they do everything they can to convince people that the problems lie anywhere
but inside Microsoft. Microsoft treats security vulnerabilities as public
relations problems. Until that changes, expect more of this kind of nonsense
from Microsoft and its products."

 
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Divine
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-14-2004
On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 21:21:21 +1200, brundlefly wrote:

> The apache project has a really interesting history
> http://httpd.apache.org/ABOUT_APACHE.html
> A small group of developers got together to salvage the NCSA httpd daemon
> and pooled all their patches and released a "patchy" webserver.



Cool! So that's the origin behind the name. Facinating.


Divine

--
"Outlook is the security equivalent of wearing condoms with the ends cut
off - for greater comfort and ease of use."

 
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brundlefly
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      06-14-2004
Divine wrote:

> On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 20:43:57 +1200, Dumbkiwi wrote:
>
>> Please tell me what end user software requires command line knowledge.

>
> RPM - if you're wanting to do more than a default install.


Kpackage

>
> also, aumix.


Kmix

>
> also ps & top - especially if you're wanting to kill a stray process.


Ksysguard

xkill

But if you want to do any of that stuff with a remote console via ssh or
telnet then the cli is a good thing.
(You can use it to fire up vnc and port forward over ssh to your vnc client
and get back on that mouse again )
 
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brundlefly
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      06-14-2004
Allistar wrote:

> brundlefly wrote:
>
>>
>> "Allistar" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:qa5zc.2281$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>
>>> Really?
>>>
>>> A large part of the open source psyche is to develop something you will

>> find
>>> useful, with no desires to get the rest of the world to use your tool.

>>
>> Why would you provide the source code then ?

>
> To get other people to help you. Or even <gasp> to share.
>
> Allistar.


That sounds like the rest of the world to me.
 
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