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Microsoft Office 2003 Student & Teachers Edition...

 
 
Aaron Zarlos
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      06-12-2004
Seeing as I qualify for this version, can anyone tell me what the difference
is between the standard version and the students & teachers version? I also
note there is a Office Professional Academic version which includes Access
and Publisher in addition to the standard Office programs.

What I want to know before I buy is if the student & teacher version is the
same as the standard version, or are the parts of Word, Excel, etc that
aren't installed? Also, can students buy the Academic version of the Office
Professional, or is this only for schools, universities, etc?

Any answers, comment, etc appreciated.

Aaron


 
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a
Guest
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      06-12-2004
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) says...
> Seeing as I qualify for this version, can anyone tell me what the difference
> is between the standard version and the students & teachers version? I also
> note there is a Office Professional Academic version which includes Access
> and Publisher in addition to the standard Office programs.
>
> What I want to know before I buy is if the student & teacher version is the
> same as the standard version, or are the parts of Word, Excel, etc that
> aren't installed? Also, can students buy the Academic version of the Office
> Professional, or is this only for schools, universities, etc?
>
> Any answers, comment, etc appreciated.
>
> Aaron
>
>
>

read about it here:

http://www.microsoft.com/nz/educatio...ktoschool.aspx
 
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Adam Warner
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      06-12-2004
Hi Aaron Zarlos,

> Seeing as I qualify for this version, can anyone tell me what the
> difference is between the standard version and the students & teachers
> version?


You are not permitted to earn an income using the software. Even serfs are
permitted to use their tools for work. Consider this if you want to be
able, for example, to earn some income over the school holidays using the
software.

<http://www.microsoft.com/nz/education/forstudents/backtoschool.aspx>
"Office Student and Teacher Edition 2003 is also for non-commercial,
educational use only."

<http://www.microsoft.com/nz/office/students/prodinfo/doyouqualify.aspx>
"You're restricted to using this product for non-commercial
(non-revenue-generating) use."

Start learning to use software that is not going to affect your potential
to earn revenue. If you can't afford the version that will permit you to
earn a dollar then perhaps it's a wake up call to consider something else.

Regards,
Adam
 
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Patrick Dunford
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      06-12-2004
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, (E-Mail Removed) says...
> Seeing as I qualify for this version, can anyone tell me what the difference
> is between the standard version and the students & teachers version? I also
> note there is a Office Professional Academic version which includes Access
> and Publisher in addition to the standard Office programs.
>
> What I want to know before I buy is if the student & teacher version is the
> same as the standard version, or are the parts of Word, Excel, etc that
> aren't installed? Also, can students buy the Academic version of the Office
> Professional, or is this only for schools, universities, etc?


Academic is generally available for students. There are restrictions on
the use of the academic licenses IIRC.
 
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Patrick Bold
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      06-12-2004
"Adam Warner" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed) .nz...
> Hi Aaron Zarlos,
>
> > Seeing as I qualify for this version, can anyone tell me what the
> > difference is between the standard version and the students &

teachers
> > version?

>
> You are not permitted to earn an income using the software. Even serfs

are
> permitted to use their tools for work. Consider this if you want to be
> able, for example, to earn some income over the school holidays using

the
> software.
>
>

Funny thing -- the only people more obsessed with Microsoft licensing
restrictions than Microsoft are Linux fanatics. Please try to get it
right, at least. Yes, the student-teacher versions are restricted to
non-commercial, non-revenue-generating uses. But to suggest that no one
can earn a living with these tools is dead wrong. Teachers and other
educational staff can do so, as the license specifies. As for students,
I'm not sure what sort of summer job you have in find that would be
problematic. Microsoft's very purpose in offering a low-cost version of
its Office products to students is to get them "hooked", and so in
practice there has always been a fairly loose understanding of what is
permissible. You couldn't publish a book in Word, but you could
certainly prepare the final draft; you couldn't run your boss's
inventory system directly off your Excel spreadsheet, but there's
nothing to stop you from tinkering with the design of the spreadsheet
itself at home; and so on.

> Start learning to use software that is not going to affect your

potential
> to earn revenue. If you can't afford the version that will permit you

to
> earn a dollar then perhaps it's a wake up call to consider something

else.
>


Whatever one's opinion of Microsoft and its products might be, it is
precisely because knowledge of how to utilize Microsoft's tools can
"affect your potential to earn revenue" that people want to get their
hands on them. Come the day Linux (or something else) emerges as a
serious desktop rival, then this will undoubtedly change. Many
individuals such as yourself have already bet on that outcome, but I see
no point in haranguing those whose perception of things in different
right now. Time will tell who's right.


 
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Petrushka
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-12-2004
Aaron Zarlos wrote:
> Seeing as I qualify for this version, can anyone tell me what the difference
> is between the standard version and the students & teachers version? I also
> note there is a Office Professional Academic version which includes Access
> and Publisher in addition to the standard Office programs.
>
> What I want to know before I buy is if the student & teacher version is the
> same as the standard version, or are the parts of Word, Excel, etc that
> aren't installed? Also, can students buy the Academic version of the Office
> Professional, or is this only for schools, universities, etc?
>
> Any answers, comment, etc appreciated.


For the sake of getting a fullness of comments, can you tell us what you
intend to use - i.e. do you want it just for Word, or will you be using
Outlook, PowerPoint, ...

>
> Aaron
>
>



--
Petrushka | Wellington, NZ
de_meun at yahoo dot com
 
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Nathan Mercer
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-13-2004
"Aaron Zarlos" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:<(E-Mail Removed)>...
> Seeing as I qualify for this version, can anyone tell me what the difference
> is between the standard version and the students & teachers version? I also
> note there is a Office Professional Academic version which includes Access
> and Publisher in addition to the standard Office programs.
>
> What I want to know before I buy is if the student & teacher version is the
> same as the standard version, or are the parts of Word, Excel, etc that
> aren't installed? Also, can students buy the Academic version of the Office
> Professional, or is this only for schools, universities, etc?


Well at least one thing the S&T edition has over all the others, is
that you are allowed to install it on up to 3 computers in your house
 
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Adam Warner
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-13-2004
Hi Patrick Bold,

> "Adam Warner" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news(E-Mail Removed) .nz...
>> Hi Aaron Zarlos,
>>
>> > Seeing as I qualify for this version, can anyone tell me what the
>> > difference is between the standard version and the students &

> teachers
>> > version?

>>
>> You are not permitted to earn an income using the software. Even serfs

> are
>> permitted to use their tools for work. Consider this if you want to be
>> able, for example, to earn some income over the school holidays using

> the
>> software.


Please
learn how to
quote
correctly.

> Funny thing -- the only people more obsessed with Microsoft licensing
> restrictions than Microsoft are Linux fanatics. Please try to get it
> right, at least. Yes, the student-teacher versions are restricted to
> non-commercial, non-revenue-generating uses. But to suggest that no one
> can earn a living with these tools is dead wrong.


Although I understand Microsoft's field of use restrictions are legally
controversial what part of the phrase "non-revenue-generating uses" is
ambiguous? If a student uses the software to earn income over the school
holidays how can that use not be revenue generating?

Apologists like you are sad. You run around making excuses for corporation
policies that are clearly intended to prohibit the use a product in a
revenue generating situation. My pen can be used in a commercial setting.
I don't have to buy an identical set of clothes at six times the price
from my ordinary clothes because my ordinary clothes aren't licensed for
use in a commercial setting. I can use my car to drive to work in addition
to driving to see my grandmother. Yet my computer becomes a device that
can not be used productivity if I accept these plainly worded restrictions.

> Teachers and other educational staff can do so, as the license
> specifies.


While I commented upon a student earning income in the school holidays
please quote from this licence as it conflicts with the claims I quoted
from Microsoft's own website.

> As for students, I'm not sure what sort of summer job you have in find
> that would be problematic. Microsoft's very purpose in offering a
> low-cost version of its Office products to students is to get them
> "hooked", and so in practice there has always been a fairly loose
> understanding of what is permissible.


The fact that Microsoft will look the other way to get students hooked on
the product does not justify the written policy.

> You couldn't publish a book in Word, but you could certainly prepare the
> final draft; you couldn't run your boss's inventory system directly off
> your Excel spreadsheet, but there's nothing to stop you from tinkering
> with the design of the spreadsheet itself at home; and so on.


[I suspect Microsoft would consider these commercial use]

Generally these are restrictions upon student participation in our
economy. You are OK with students being encouraged to accept these field
of use restrictions (with the weaker form of the defence being that the
restrictions are fairly loosely enforced so they don't matter).

>> Start learning to use software that is not going to affect your

> potential
>> to earn revenue. If you can't afford the version that will permit you

> to
>> earn a dollar then perhaps it's a wake up call to consider something

> else.
>>
>>

> Whatever one's opinion of Microsoft and its products might be, it is
> precisely because knowledge of how to utilize Microsoft's tools can
> "affect your potential to earn revenue" that people want to get their
> hands on them. Come the day Linux (or something else) emerges as a
> serious desktop rival, then this will undoubtedly change. Many
> individuals such as yourself have already bet on that outcome, but I see
> no point in haranguing those whose perception of things in different
> right now. Time will tell who's right.


I harangued no one. It is you who is the fanatic apologising for
Microsoft's plainly worded statements. Educationalists shouldn't encourage
students to purchase vocational tools that they may not use to generate
revenue while learning.

Why do you keep droning on about Linux? What has this got to do with a
serious desktop rival? Here's an example of enlightened education policy:
<http://www.cxotoday.com/cxo/jsp/index.jsp?section=News&subsection=Business&subsect ion_code=1&file=template1.jsp&storyid=1033>

With such a policy students will be able to interoperate with each
school's office software without being encouraged to give up their ability
to generate revenue and participate in the economy using compatible
software.

Regards,
Adam
 
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Divine
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-13-2004
On Sat, 12 Jun 2004 19:21:28 -0700, Nathan Mercer wrote:

> Well at least one thing the S&T edition has over all the others, is
> that you are allowed to install it on up to 3 computers in your house



Wow! Three whole computers!

All the *nix based software that I have - including the Operating Systems
- can be installed on as MANY computers as I want to put them on - WITHOUT
RESTRICTION.

Three computers - pah!


Divine

--
The Queen's Mother: "Well I don't know what all you queens are doing,
but this old Queen wants a drink."

 
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Patrick Dunford
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-13-2004
In article <pan.2004.06.13.03.59.10.858478@TRACKER>,
(E-Mail Removed) says...
> On Sat, 12 Jun 2004 19:21:28 -0700, Nathan Mercer wrote:
>
> > Well at least one thing the S&T edition has over all the others, is
> > that you are allowed to install it on up to 3 computers in your house

>
>
> Wow! Three whole computers!
>
> All the *nix based software that I have - including the Operating Systems
> - can be installed on as MANY computers as I want to put them on - WITHOUT
> RESTRICTION.


Yeah, and I bet there's some Unix software that has more restrictive
licensing conditions.

Anyway licenses are available to put MS software on unlimited numbers of
PCS
 
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