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Bad capacitor replacement?

 
 
Gregory Parker
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-03-2003
On Wed, 3 Dec 2003 19:10:47 +1300, "harry" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Gregory Parker wrote:
>> On Wed, 3 Dec 2003 18:06:58 +1300, "harry" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> Mainlander wrote:
>>>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) says...
>>>>> Mainlander wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, (E-Mail Removed)
>>>>>> says...
>>>>>>> ~misfit~ wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I have a mobo here that has bad caps. Of the 25 or so large ones
>>>>>>>> ten are domed or bulging. The PC spontaneously re-boots after 30
>>>>>>>> seconds or so. (Tried with three different PSUs).
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I haven't attempted doing anything like replacing caps on a mobo
>>>>>>>> before, I may be capable of it but would hate to risk the board.
>>>>>>>> I'm in South Auckland, does anyone know of an outfit or person
>>>>>>>> who could provide this service and any idea what it would cost?
>>>>>>>> Or should I just attempt it myself? (And where would be the best
>>>>>>>> place for a novice to get the caps at the right price?)
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> It's not really a throw-away board, it's an Abit BX133 RAID, set
>>>>>>>> up to run a Tualatin CPU. (Upgradeware 370 adapter). I'm unable
>>>>>>>> to get the CPU/adapter to run in any of the other boards I have
>>>>>>>> here at the moment so would like to explore the option of
>>>>>>>> getting the caps replaced in this board.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> As usual, all input gratefully recieved.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Just clip off the old capacitor leaving a bit of a lead.
>>>>>>> Then solder the new capacitor onto the old leads.
>>>>>>> No need to suck the solder out of the multi-layer holes or
>>>>>>> anything like that.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The reason they are not soldered on with long leads in the first
>>>>>> place are very sound, including:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 1. mechanical strength.
>>>>>> 2. The long leads are more likely to get bent and short against
>>>>>> each other or other nearby caps.
>>>>>> 3. At the frequencies that an average PC runs at, short lead
>>>>>> lengths are very important to keep things stable.
>>>>>
>>>>> Bullshit.
>>>>> They are not high frequency caps. There are other caps for that.
>>>>> They have lots and lots of foil. Break one open and have a look.
>>>>>
>>>>> Keep the lead short because of high freqs!!! What a joke.
>>>>
>>>> Don't you know anything about RF equipment?
>>>>
>>>> A PC is not a radio transmitter, but the frequencies that the CPU
>>>> and supporting components operate at are similar to UHF
>>>> telecommunication equipment. At such frequencies, construction
>>>> techniques are quite important.
>>>>
>>>> It is well known that PCs tend to radiate at RF frequencies and can
>>>> cause interference to audio equipment nearby.
>>>
>>> The electrolytic capacitors are not part of the circuitry that
>>> operates at RF frequencies though, the wavelengths that electrolytic
>>> capacitors are used at are kilometers.
>>>

>>
>>
>>
>> Gee what a load of Wankers we have here with no utter clues at all.
>>
>> Do some research into Switched mode PSU and also Dnload the P4 Data
>> sheets..

>
>Switched mode power supplies are not RF frequency and electrolytics are
>useless at radio frequencies.
>Looks like you are the one with your cock in your hand old man.
>




So the 60kc Ruby Atomic standard Radio station is not RF..?

Or the 200kc Atomic standard Radio BBC Light Droitwich transmitter..

Gee go back to school you know nothing..

Do some reading up on Switched mode PSU..

Seems like you have made a utter Fool of your self here..

Never mind this news group is full of people like you..


 
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harry
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-03-2003
Gregory Parker wrote:
> On Wed, 3 Dec 2003 19:10:47 +1300, "harry" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Gregory Parker wrote:
>>> On Wed, 3 Dec 2003 18:06:58 +1300, "harry" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Mainlander wrote:
>>>>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, (E-Mail Removed)
>>>>> says...
>>>>>> Mainlander wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, (E-Mail Removed)
>>>>>>> says...
>>>>>>>> ~misfit~ wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> I have a mobo here that has bad caps. Of the 25 or so large
>>>>>>>>> ones ten are domed or bulging. The PC spontaneously re-boots
>>>>>>>>> after 30 seconds or so. (Tried with three different PSUs).
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> I haven't attempted doing anything like replacing caps on a
>>>>>>>>> mobo before, I may be capable of it but would hate to risk
>>>>>>>>> the board. I'm in South Auckland, does anyone know of an
>>>>>>>>> outfit or person who could provide this service and any idea
>>>>>>>>> what it would cost? Or should I just attempt it myself? (And
>>>>>>>>> where would be the best place for a novice to get the caps at
>>>>>>>>> the right price?)
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> It's not really a throw-away board, it's an Abit BX133 RAID,
>>>>>>>>> set up to run a Tualatin CPU. (Upgradeware 370 adapter). I'm
>>>>>>>>> unable to get the CPU/adapter to run in any of the other
>>>>>>>>> boards I have here at the moment so would like to explore the
>>>>>>>>> option of getting the caps replaced in this board.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> As usual, all input gratefully recieved.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Just clip off the old capacitor leaving a bit of a lead.
>>>>>>>> Then solder the new capacitor onto the old leads.
>>>>>>>> No need to suck the solder out of the multi-layer holes or
>>>>>>>> anything like that.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> The reason they are not soldered on with long leads in the first
>>>>>>> place are very sound, including:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> 1. mechanical strength.
>>>>>>> 2. The long leads are more likely to get bent and short against
>>>>>>> each other or other nearby caps.
>>>>>>> 3. At the frequencies that an average PC runs at, short lead
>>>>>>> lengths are very important to keep things stable.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Bullshit.
>>>>>> They are not high frequency caps. There are other caps for that.
>>>>>> They have lots and lots of foil. Break one open and have a look.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Keep the lead short because of high freqs!!! What a joke.
>>>>>
>>>>> Don't you know anything about RF equipment?
>>>>>
>>>>> A PC is not a radio transmitter, but the frequencies that the CPU
>>>>> and supporting components operate at are similar to UHF
>>>>> telecommunication equipment. At such frequencies, construction
>>>>> techniques are quite important.
>>>>>
>>>>> It is well known that PCs tend to radiate at RF frequencies and
>>>>> can cause interference to audio equipment nearby.
>>>>
>>>> The electrolytic capacitors are not part of the circuitry that
>>>> operates at RF frequencies though, the wavelengths that
>>>> electrolytic capacitors are used at are kilometers.
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Gee what a load of Wankers we have here with no utter clues at all.
>>>
>>> Do some research into Switched mode PSU and also Dnload the P4 Data
>>> sheets..

>>
>> Switched mode power supplies are not RF frequency and electrolytics
>> are useless at radio frequencies.
>> Looks like you are the one with your cock in your hand old man.
>>

>
>
>
> So the 60kc Ruby Atomic standard Radio station is not RF..?
>
> Or the 200kc Atomic standard Radio BBC Light Droitwich
> transmitter..


Nothing where a millimeter or so of lead length makes any difference

You are getting really pathetic


 
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Steve Robertson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-03-2003

>
>Yes but I am a Technician not a Cowboy..
>
>When you are brought up with military standards you learn to do the right
>thing, no bodging things..
>



Yes but we are talking about a board with a value of only perhaps $50-$100 & that if its was in
perfect condition.
If a board has been written off then its OK to be a cowboy with it. If it works then its a bonus.
If you are charging for your work I would agree then you have to do it right with correct spec'd
parts.
 
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Gregory Parker
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-03-2003
On Wed, 3 Dec 2003 19:54:01 +1300, "harry" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Gregory Parker wrote:
>> On Wed, 3 Dec 2003 19:10:47 +1300, "harry" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> Gregory Parker wrote:
>>>> On Wed, 3 Dec 2003 18:06:58 +1300, "harry" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Mainlander wrote:
>>>>>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, (E-Mail Removed)
>>>>>> says...
>>>>>>> Mainlander wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, (E-Mail Removed)
>>>>>>>> says...
>>>>>>>>> ~misfit~ wrote:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> I have a mobo here that has bad caps. Of the 25 or so large
>>>>>>>>>> ones ten are domed or bulging. The PC spontaneously re-boots
>>>>>>>>>> after 30 seconds or so. (Tried with three different PSUs).
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> I haven't attempted doing anything like replacing caps on a
>>>>>>>>>> mobo before, I may be capable of it but would hate to risk
>>>>>>>>>> the board. I'm in South Auckland, does anyone know of an
>>>>>>>>>> outfit or person who could provide this service and any idea
>>>>>>>>>> what it would cost? Or should I just attempt it myself? (And
>>>>>>>>>> where would be the best place for a novice to get the caps at
>>>>>>>>>> the right price?)
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> It's not really a throw-away board, it's an Abit BX133 RAID,
>>>>>>>>>> set up to run a Tualatin CPU. (Upgradeware 370 adapter). I'm
>>>>>>>>>> unable to get the CPU/adapter to run in any of the other
>>>>>>>>>> boards I have here at the moment so would like to explore the
>>>>>>>>>> option of getting the caps replaced in this board.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> As usual, all input gratefully recieved.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Just clip off the old capacitor leaving a bit of a lead.
>>>>>>>>> Then solder the new capacitor onto the old leads.
>>>>>>>>> No need to suck the solder out of the multi-layer holes or
>>>>>>>>> anything like that.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> The reason they are not soldered on with long leads in the first
>>>>>>>> place are very sound, including:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> 1. mechanical strength.
>>>>>>>> 2. The long leads are more likely to get bent and short against
>>>>>>>> each other or other nearby caps.
>>>>>>>> 3. At the frequencies that an average PC runs at, short lead
>>>>>>>> lengths are very important to keep things stable.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Bullshit.
>>>>>>> They are not high frequency caps. There are other caps for that.
>>>>>>> They have lots and lots of foil. Break one open and have a look.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Keep the lead short because of high freqs!!! What a joke.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Don't you know anything about RF equipment?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> A PC is not a radio transmitter, but the frequencies that the CPU
>>>>>> and supporting components operate at are similar to UHF
>>>>>> telecommunication equipment. At such frequencies, construction
>>>>>> techniques are quite important.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> It is well known that PCs tend to radiate at RF frequencies and
>>>>>> can cause interference to audio equipment nearby.
>>>>>
>>>>> The electrolytic capacitors are not part of the circuitry that
>>>>> operates at RF frequencies though, the wavelengths that
>>>>> electrolytic capacitors are used at are kilometers.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Gee what a load of Wankers we have here with no utter clues at all.
>>>>
>>>> Do some research into Switched mode PSU and also Dnload the P4 Data
>>>> sheets..
>>>
>>> Switched mode power supplies are not RF frequency and electrolytics
>>> are useless at radio frequencies.
>>> Looks like you are the one with your cock in your hand old man.
>>>

>>
>>
>>
>> So the 60kc Ruby Atomic standard Radio station is not RF..?
>>
>> Or the 200kc Atomic standard Radio BBC Light Droitwich
>> transmitter..

>
>Nothing where a millimeter or so of lead length makes any difference
>
>You are getting really pathetic
>




I am referring to ESR not Lead length



 
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Gregory Parker
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-03-2003
On Wed, 03 Dec 2003 07:50:03 GMT, (E-Mail Removed) (Steve Robertson) wrote:

>
>>
>>Yes but I am a Technician not a Cowboy..
>>
>>When you are brought up with military standards you learn to do the right
>>thing, no bodging things..
>>

>
>
>Yes but we are talking about a board with a value of only perhaps $50-$100 & that if its was in
>perfect condition.
>If a board has been written off then its OK to be a cowboy with it. If it works then its a bonus.
>If you are charging for your work I would agree then you have to do it right with correct spec'd
>parts.




Yes but I do every thing right, that is the Pommy way..

No we did not invent the No.8 Fence wire..


 
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Peter Lowrie
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-03-2003
Mainlander wrote:
> I'd take note of what Alan said in his post about repairing these things.



> If you damage the internal traces there's no way of repairing them, so


Utter rubbish.

> you'd want to be pretty sure what you're doing.


Don't take the slightest notice of Mainlander he doesn't know what he's
talking about.

1. You need to test the ESR of the mobo caps.
2. If bulging replace 'em regardless.
3. faulty mobo caps are a global phenominon.
4. Unsolder them and replace them, be sure to use 105 degree caps.

Every mobo I have ever installed has had at least 1 out-of-spec electrolytic
capacitor onboard. I never install a new mobo without 1st checking them.

Electronics World published an article about this topic some time back.

Peter Lowrie
 
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~misfit~
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-03-2003
Peter Lowrie wrote:
> Mainlander wrote:
>> I'd take note of what Alan said in his post about repairing these
>> things.

>
>
>> If you damage the internal traces there's no way of repairing them,
>> so

>
> Utter rubbish.
>
>> you'd want to be pretty sure what you're doing.

>
> Don't take the slightest notice of Mainlander he doesn't know what
> he's talking about.
>
> 1. You need to test the ESR of the mobo caps.
> 2. If bulging replace 'em regardless.
> 3. faulty mobo caps are a global phenominon.
> 4. Unsolder them and replace them, be sure to use 105 degree caps.
>
> Every mobo I have ever installed has had at least 1 out-of-spec
> electrolytic capacitor onboard. I never install a new mobo without
> 1st checking them.
>
> Electronics World published an article about this topic some time
> back.


Thanks for the tips Peter.
--
~misfit~


---
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Mainlander
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-04-2003
In article <7oizb.11183$(E-Mail Removed)>,
(E-Mail Removed) says...
> Mainlander wrote:
> > I'd take note of what Alan said in his post about repairing these things.

>
>
> > If you damage the internal traces there's no way of repairing them, so

>
> Utter rubbish.


If the through hole plating gets ripped out, being inside the board they
are not physically accessible.

> > you'd want to be pretty sure what you're doing.

>
> Don't take the slightest notice of Mainlander he doesn't know what he's
> talking about.



I know you're a spammer
 
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Jay
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-04-2003
Mainlander wrote:

> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, (E-Mail Removed) says...
>> Uncle StoatWarbler wrote:
>>
>> > On Fri, 28 Nov 2003 20:07:46 +1100, Jay wrote:
>> >
>> >> Just clip off the old capacitor leaving a bit of a lead.
>> >
>> > These aren't 1960s era Sony AM radios - or 1970s era Pye TVs.
>> >
>> > The caps are mounted flush to the board. How do you propose to clip
>> > 'em?
>> >
>> >> Then solder the new capacitor onto the old leads.
>> >
>> > Usually as soon as you try this trick the tail drifts or the joint ends
>> > up dry. It takes a skilled solderer to make it all happen just right.

>>
>> Don't be a dickhead.
>> The leads go right to the top of the body of the capacitor.
>> Cut the cap midway thru the body and you'll have lots of lead.

>
> Don't spill any of the guts on your board


Hold the pcb upside-down - it goes without saying?

 
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Jay
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-04-2003
harry wrote:

>>
>> So the 60kc Ruby Atomic standard Radio station is not RF..?
>>
>> Or the 200kc Atomic standard Radio BBC Light Droitwich
>> transmitter..

>
> Nothing where a millimeter or so of lead length makes any difference
>
> You are getting really pathetic


You are wasting your breath.

Only a nutter would think that a switch-mode power supply was
somehow connected to an atomic standard. Or that freqencies above
a few kilohertz would rather travel up the legs of an electrolytic.

Better get an ESR cap to suppress those cosmic radiations from
the atomic standards on 60kc (I think kc means kilocyles - that is
your answer as to what ancient era GP comes from).

 
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