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And so it begins...

 
 
techie
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      11-27-2003
Guess they didn't learn from PhoenixNet.


<http://news.com.com/2100-7339_3-5111993.html>

Phoenix toughens up BIOS

The software that sits between the operating system and a
PC's hardware hasn't changed much in decades. Now,
Phoenix Technologies wants to introduce greater security,
usability and copy protection.

<snip>

The plans have been criticized as crippling PCs'
capabilities, solidifying the Microsoft operating system
monopoly, and even, in cases where DRM is introduced,
extending copyright holders' power into areas that have
traditionally remained under the control of consumers.
 
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Evil Bastard
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      11-27-2003
On Wed, 26 Nov 2003 19:33:13 -0600, techie wrote:

> Guess they didn't learn from PhoenixNet.
> <http://news.com.com/2100-7339_3-5111993.html>
>
> Phoenix toughens up BIOS
>
> The software that sits between the operating system and a
> PC's hardware hasn't changed much in decades. Now,
> Phoenix Technologies wants to introduce greater security,
> usability and copy protection.
>
> <snip>
>
> The plans have been criticized as crippling PCs'
> capabilities, solidifying the Microsoft operating system
> monopoly, and even, in cases where DRM is introduced,
> extending copyright holders' power into areas that have
> traditionally remained under the control of consumers.


This is a very real and horrific possiblity.

If M$ have their way, no home or office computer will be able to run any
program not bearing an M$-issued certificate. And the certification
process will cost a mint.

The only exception will be programs that can only run within the most
repressively sandboxed environments.

Likely, the concept of a 'file' as we've always known it will disappear
forever. This basic unit of storage will change to one where the actual
data is encrypted, and enmeshed with all kinds of metadata. When emailing
a file to someone, there will be no way to send just the data - one will
only be able to send this 'black box', containing all kinds of info that
one has no access to.

The real risk is that Joe Windows ****wit will fall for those sexy
levitation ads and buy the new policeware-infested hardware with nary a
question about limitations. Likely though, Joe Windows ****wit will be
tipped off well in advance that he might not be able to send wedding
videos to his relatives with the new hardware.

Sadly for Microfraud though, the Open Source community has gotten way too
large and powerful for them to get away with this kind of ****, and is
getting larger and more powerful every day, with governments and large
corporations getting on board.

Phoenix can ship all the crippled BIOSes it likes, but there will remain
an immovable core of users and developers worldwide who will either not
buy the ****, or will not consent to enabling any DRM features, and will
refuse to surf websites or send/receive emails/documents etc with DRM
restrictions.

Not to mention the fact that as soon as the new DRM chips are hot off the
foundries, crackers will be building DRM->non-DRM bridges.

The only way to have any effective DRM is to sever people's optic and
auditory nerves, and install DRM chips to filter the signals on those
nerves. Which is not likely to happen (too) soon.

EB

 
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Evil Bastard
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      11-27-2003
>> Guess they didn't learn from PhoenixNet.
>> <http://news.com.com/2100-7339_3-5111993.html>
>>
>> Phoenix toughens up BIOS


A harrowing scenario some years ahead...

New operating systems which do not allow users to create files, unless
user has a personal ID certificate.

Files can only be accessed by 'trusted' M$-certified apps.

The free and cheap apps write indelible metadata along with the file,
which restricts redistribution of the file to a limited number of others.

To get an app which allows one to create a file readable by everyone,
would cost a huge license fee.

Web server software such as Apache locked out. DRM-compatible web server
software - well, you pay by the hit. Want a mass audience? Well, you'd
better have a budget comparable with that of Big Media.

No way of removing from a file the metadata which identifies you
personally as the creator - goodbye anonymous authorship.

Apps which are paid for by annual subscription. Let your subscription run
out, and you can no longer access your own files.

Say anything in your files which offends anyone such as M$. Lose your
licenses.

Here's praying that the backbone internet routers will never succumb to
Digital Repression Management. If that happens, we're ****ed! That would
result in an internet where you can't even go online unless you're under
DRM bondage.

Here's also hoping that the open computing fraternity will put up websites
keeping track of exactly what repression is built into what hardware. I
for one would be willing to do shifts standing outside ComputerCity, Dick
Smith etc, handing out warning brochures to prospective computer
purchasers.

EB

 
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dOTdASH
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      11-27-2003
"Evil Bastard" <postmaster@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
newsan.2003.11.27.06.43.40.698317@127.0.0.1...
> >> Guess they didn't learn from PhoenixNet.
> >> <http://news.com.com/2100-7339_3-5111993.html>
> >>
> >> Phoenix toughens up BIOS

>
> A harrowing scenario some years ahead...
>
> New operating systems which do not allow users to create files, unless
> user has a personal ID certificate.
>
> Files can only be accessed by 'trusted' M$-certified apps.
>
> The free and cheap apps write indelible metadata along with the file,
> which restricts redistribution of the file to a limited number of others.
>
> To get an app which allows one to create a file readable by everyone,
> would cost a huge license fee.
>
> Web server software such as Apache locked out. DRM-compatible web server
> software - well, you pay by the hit. Want a mass audience? Well, you'd
> better have a budget comparable with that of Big Media.
>
> No way of removing from a file the metadata which identifies you
> personally as the creator - goodbye anonymous authorship.
>
> Apps which are paid for by annual subscription. Let your subscription run
> out, and you can no longer access your own files.
>
> Say anything in your files which offends anyone such as M$. Lose your
> licenses.
>
> Here's praying that the backbone internet routers will never succumb to
> Digital Repression Management. If that happens, we're ****ed! That would
> result in an internet where you can't even go online unless you're under
> DRM bondage.
>
> Here's also hoping that the open computing fraternity will put up websites
> keeping track of exactly what repression is built into what hardware. I
> for one would be willing to do shifts standing outside ComputerCity, Dick
> Smith etc, handing out warning brochures to prospective computer
> purchasers.
>
> EB
>


This is conspiratorial crap. If Microsoft or any other company acted that
way customers would vote with their wallets and go elsewhere. Your hatred of
all things Microsoft is clouding your logic.


 
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Evil Bastard
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      11-27-2003
On Thu, 27 Nov 2003 22:18:52 +1300, dOTdASH wrote:

> This is conspiratorial crap. If Microsoft or any other company acted that
> way customers would vote with their wallets and go elsewhere. Your hatred of
> all things Microsoft is clouding your logic.


Stick a frog in a beaker of boiling water, it'll jump out straight away.

Put it in a beaker of lukewarm water, heat slowly to boiling, and you've
got a cooked frog.

And yes - I do hate Microsoft - I won't deny that. As I hate all companies
that use huge marketing budgets to pull the wool over people's eyes.

It's only because of the abstract nature of software that M$ get away with
as much **** as they do. If they pulled the same **** in the auto industry
(for example), there'd be executives serving long jail time.

 
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steve
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      11-27-2003
dOTdASH allegedly said:

>
> This is conspiratorial crap. If Microsoft or any other company acted that
> way customers would vote with their wallets and go elsewhere. Your hatred
> of all things Microsoft is clouding your logic.


Think again. Microsoft will be doing this with the complete support for US
Attorney General John Ashcroft as a "key part in the War on Terror".

It will be legally required in the US....andanyone wanting a free trade
agreement with them will have to "harmonise" their laws.

Looks like it is time to develop a domestic, NZ, computer hardware
capability - however rudimentary it might be.

At least it will be free.

--
Best Regards,
Steve Withers
defenestrate: The act of throwing Windows out the window and replacing it on
your PC with some other operating system.


 
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steve
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      11-27-2003
Evil Bastard allegedly said:

> On Thu, 27 Nov 2003 22:18:52 +1300, dOTdASH wrote:
>
>> This is conspiratorial crap. If Microsoft or any other company acted that
>> way customers would vote with their wallets and go elsewhere. Your hatred
>> of all things Microsoft is clouding your logic.

>
> Stick a frog in a beaker of boiling water, it'll jump out straight away.
>
> Put it in a beaker of lukewarm water, heat slowly to boiling, and you've
> got a cooked frog.
>
> And yes - I do hate Microsoft - I won't deny that. As I hate all companies
> that use huge marketing budgets to pull the wool over people's eyes.
>
> It's only because of the abstract nature of software that M$ get away with
> as much **** as they do. If they pulled the same **** in the auto industry
> (for example), there'd be executives serving long jail time.


Don't forget the "War on Terror", Evil.

All manner of fascism is being foisted upon the peoples in the world in its
name.....the US worst of all.

--
Best Regards,
Steve Withers
defenestrate: The act of throwing Windows out the window and replacing it on
your PC with some other operating system.


 
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Adam Warner
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      11-27-2003
Hi Evil Bastard,

> Stick a frog in a beaker of boiling water, it'll jump out straight away.
>
> Put it in a beaker of lukewarm water, heat slowly to boiling, and you've
> got a cooked frog.


Apparently this is an urban myth. Scientists have gradually heated
submerged amphibians and reptiles to test their "critical thermal maxima".
If frogs have an opportunity to jump out they will.
<http://www.snopes.com/critters/wild/frogboil.htm>

However, `Like a fable, the "boiled frog" anecdote serves its purpose
whether or not it's based upon something that is literally true.'

Regards,
Adam
 
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Ralph Mason
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      11-27-2003

"techie" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed) alid...
> Guess they didn't learn from PhoenixNet.
>
>
> <http://news.com.com/2100-7339_3-5111993.html>
>
> Phoenix toughens up BIOS
>
> The software that sits between the operating system and a
> PC's hardware hasn't changed much in decades. Now,
> Phoenix Technologies wants to introduce greater security,
> usability and copy protection.
>
> <snip>
>
> The plans have been criticized as crippling PCs'
> capabilities, solidifying the Microsoft operating system
> monopoly, and even, in cases where DRM is introduced,
> extending copyright holders' power into areas that have
> traditionally remained under the control of consumers.


Open source bios is the next frontier then.

These companies just love shooting themselves in the foot.

Ralph


 
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T.N.O.
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-27-2003
Adam Warner wrote:
>>Stick a frog in a beaker of boiling water, it'll jump out straight away.
>>Put it in a beaker of lukewarm water, heat slowly to boiling, and you've
>>got a cooked frog.


> Apparently this is an urban myth. Scientists have gradually heated
> submerged amphibians and reptiles to test their "critical thermal maxima".
> If frogs have an opportunity to jump out they will.
> <http://www.snopes.com/critters/wild/frogboil.htm>
> However, `Like a fable, the "boiled frog" anecdote serves its purpose
> whether or not it's based upon something that is literally true.'


You can however do it with Crayfish...

 
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