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ADSL and Apple Mac

 
 
Uncle StoatWarbler
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      10-26-2003
On Mon, 27 Oct 2003 01:03:08 +1300, Lawrence DčOliveiro wrote:

> A modem/router will, in addition to basic ADSL connectivity, also provide
> ENAT service (Extended Network Address Translation), which lets you share
> the internet connection among multiple machines


As a nice side-benefit, NAT/Enat setups will firewall your machine from
most of the scanning nasty attacks out there.


 
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Bruce Hoult
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      10-28-2003
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
Lawrence DčOliveiro <(E-Mail Removed)_zealand> wrote:
> I bought a D-Link DSL-500 from Dick Smith. The salesperson assured me
> their house-brand box did exactly the same things and cost a little
> less, but I thought I'd stick to a brand I was familiar with, just to be
> safe (I already had a D-Link 8-port switch).


I've had a D-Link DSL-504 for just over two years. It's got a five port
10/100 switch built in, but otherwise is I think pretty much the same as
yours.


> A modem/router will, in addition to basic ADSL connectivity, also
> provide ENAT service (Extended Network Address Translation), which lets
> you share the internet connection among multiple machines, as well as
> DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol), which means your machines
> will automatically be assigned dynamic IP addresses from the private
> range without having to be configured individually.


Not just IP addresses, but also the adresses of the gateway, the DNS
server etc.

When I bought the DSL-504 it only let you enter the DNS address and
provided it to the DHCP clients, but a firmware update gave it full DNS
proxy/cache capabilities, so now *it* is the DNS for my network.


> As for machines I am running, I have a 10-year-old Centris 650 (MacOS
> 7.6.1), a 5-year-old beige PowerMac G3 (MacOS 9.0.4), and a
> one-and-a-half-year-old iMac G4/800 (MacOS 9.2.2), all successfully
> accessing the Internet through this setup.


Mine is supporting:
- eight year old PowerMac 8500 (MacOS 9.1)
- five year old PowerBook G3 (MacOS X 10.2.
- six month old iMac G4/1000 (MacOS X 10.2.8, Panther RSN...)
- three year old homemade Athlon 700 running SuSe 7.1 Linux
- five year old Pentium Pro 200 running RedHat Linux
- eight year old SGI Indy, running Irix
- thirteen (?) year old SPARC ELC running Solaris 7

OK, so some of those don't get used much ... but they all work just fine.

-- Bruce
 
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