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mirror lockup on Nikon D200/300 and Canon 40D

 
 
TH O
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      01-01-2008
Does mirror lockup on both the Nikon D200 and D300 always stop
functioning when the battery is less than 3/4 full? Does the Canon 40D
mirror lockup function stop working before the batter dies?

Thanks.
 
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AAvK
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-02-2008

"TH O" <tho@tho.23.invalid> wrote in message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Does mirror lockup on both the Nikon D200 and D300 always stop
> functioning when the battery is less than 3/4 full? Does the Canon 40D
> mirror lockup function stop working before the batter dies?
>
> Thanks.




I don't think you'd need it anyway... I used to use a Canon F1n, the later version,
which was a tank quality professional machine (except the stupid old fashioned
horizontal-travel shutter curtains). No ML built into this body at all, but it had
a special "no vibration" type of mirror mechanism and I was doing micro-macro
with it on old postage stamps, coming out razor sharp. Tiny sections of the stamps.
The production of it stopped some time in the mid 90's?

I suspect these days, that is the norm on any higher-end camera body like the ones
you suggest, pro-sumer above consumer level. You could research it on the maker's
websites, as well. JAO.

--
Giant_Alex }<)))*>
not my site: http://www.e-sword.net/
 
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TH O
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-02-2008
In article <uXUej.33681$(E-Mail Removed)>,
"AAvK" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> "TH O" <tho@tho.23.invalid> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Does mirror lockup on both the Nikon D200 and D300 always stop
> > functioning when the battery is less than 3/4 full? Does the Canon 40D
> > mirror lockup function stop working before the batter dies?
> >
> > Thanks.

>
>
>
> I don't think you'd need it anyway... I used to use a Canon F1n, the later
> version,
> which was a tank quality professional machine (except the stupid old
> fashioned
> horizontal-travel shutter curtains). No ML built into this body at all, but
> it had
> a special "no vibration" type of mirror mechanism and I was doing micro-macro
> with it on old postage stamps, coming out razor sharp. Tiny sections of the
> stamps.
> The production of it stopped some time in the mid 90's?
>
> I suspect these days, that is the norm on any higher-end camera body like the
> ones
> you suggest, pro-sumer above consumer level. You could research it on the
> maker's
> websites, as well. JAO.


I'm looking at it for landscape photography. I used a D200 and couldn't
activate the feature when only 2 bars were off the battery symbol. I've
heard that the feature is disabled when the batteries are nearly dead
but this is ridiculous. Older film bodies never limited photogs in this
way ... it is almost like they are fixing a nonexistant problem.
 
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acl
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-02-2008
On Jan 3, 2:42 am, TH O <t...@tho.23.invalid> wrote:
> In article <uXUej.33681$(E-Mail Removed)>,
>
>
>
> "AAvK" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > "TH O" <t...@tho.23.invalid> wrote in message
> >news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > Does mirror lockup on both the Nikon D200 and D300 always stop
> > > functioning when the battery is less than 3/4 full? Does the Canon 40D
> > > mirror lockup function stop working before the batter dies?

>
> > > Thanks.

>
> > I don't think you'd need it anyway... I used to use a Canon F1n, the later
> > version,
> > which was a tank quality professional machine (except the stupid old
> > fashioned
> > horizontal-travel shutter curtains). No ML built into this body at all, but
> > it had
> > a special "no vibration" type of mirror mechanism and I was doing micro-macro
> > with it on old postage stamps, coming out razor sharp. Tiny sections of the
> > stamps.
> > The production of it stopped some time in the mid 90's?

>
> > I suspect these days, that is the norm on any higher-end camera body like the
> > ones
> > you suggest, pro-sumer above consumer level. You could research it on the
> > maker's
> > websites, as well. JAO.

>
> I'm looking at it for landscape photography. I used a D200 and couldn't
> activate the feature when only 2 bars were off the battery symbol. I've
> heard that the feature is disabled when the batteries are nearly dead
> but this is ridiculous. Older film bodies never limited photogs in this
> way ... it is almost like they are fixing a nonexistant problem.




The feature you need (ie locking up the mirror on the first press of
the shutter release, firing it on the second) is activated by turning
the drive mode selector to MUp (that's the ring below the three
buttons on the top left of the camera, the one you need to press a
button to unlock and which is used to select drive mode).

The thing that's disabled when your battery is less the 75% is the
sensor cleaning mode (called "mirror lock-up", as opposed to "mirror
up", I suppose). That does make sense, running out of battery while
your sensor is full of cleaning liquid and you're swabbing it isn't a
good idea.

Anyway, didn't the owner of that D200 you used know this? Strange.
 
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TH O
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-03-2008
In article
<(E-Mail Removed)>,
acl <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> On Jan 3, 2:42 am, TH O <t...@tho.23.invalid> wrote:
> > In article <uXUej.33681$(E-Mail Removed)>,
> >
> >
> >
> > "AAvK" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > > "TH O" <t...@tho.23.invalid> wrote in message
> > >news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > > Does mirror lockup on both the Nikon D200 and D300 always stop
> > > > functioning when the battery is less than 3/4 full? Does the Canon 40D
> > > > mirror lockup function stop working before the batter dies?

> >
> > > > Thanks.

> >
> > > I don't think you'd need it anyway... I used to use a Canon F1n, the
> > > later
> > > version,
> > > which was a tank quality professional machine (except the stupid old
> > > fashioned
> > > horizontal-travel shutter curtains). No ML built into this body at all,
> > > but
> > > it had
> > > a special "no vibration" type of mirror mechanism and I was doing
> > > micro-macro
> > > with it on old postage stamps, coming out razor sharp. Tiny sections of
> > > the
> > > stamps.
> > > The production of it stopped some time in the mid 90's?

> >
> > > I suspect these days, that is the norm on any higher-end camera body like
> > > the
> > > ones
> > > you suggest, pro-sumer above consumer level. You could research it on
> > > the
> > > maker's
> > > websites, as well. JAO.

> >
> > I'm looking at it for landscape photography. I used a D200 and couldn't
> > activate the feature when only 2 bars were off the battery symbol. I've
> > heard that the feature is disabled when the batteries are nearly dead
> > but this is ridiculous. Older film bodies never limited photogs in this
> > way ... it is almost like they are fixing a nonexistant problem.

>
>
>
> The feature you need (ie locking up the mirror on the first press of
> the shutter release, firing it on the second) is activated by turning
> the drive mode selector to MUp (that's the ring below the three
> buttons on the top left of the camera, the one you need to press a
> button to unlock and which is used to select drive mode).
>
> The thing that's disabled when your battery is less the 75% is the
> sensor cleaning mode (called "mirror lock-up", as opposed to "mirror
> up", I suppose). That does make sense, running out of battery while
> your sensor is full of cleaning liquid and you're swabbing it isn't a
> good idea.
>
> Anyway, didn't the owner of that D200 you used know this? Strange.


That explains everything. I should have read the manual myself. I
suspect a lot of SLR users don't find a need for the feature so never
try it.

Thanks for explaining.
 
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acl
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-03-2008
On Jan 3, 3:03 am, TH O <t...@tho.23.invalid> wrote:
> In article
> <(E-Mail Removed)>,
>
>
>
> acl <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > On Jan 3, 2:42 am, TH O <t...@tho.23.invalid> wrote:
> > > In article <uXUej.33681$(E-Mail Removed)>,

>
> > > "AAvK" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > > > "TH O" <t...@tho.23.invalid> wrote in message
> > > >news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > > > Does mirror lockup on both the Nikon D200 and D300 always stop
> > > > > functioning when the battery is less than 3/4 full? Does the Canon 40D
> > > > > mirror lockup function stop working before the batter dies?

>
> > > > > Thanks.

>
> > > > I don't think you'd need it anyway... I used to use a Canon F1n, the
> > > > later
> > > > version,
> > > > which was a tank quality professional machine (except the stupid old
> > > > fashioned
> > > > horizontal-travel shutter curtains). No ML built into this body at all,
> > > > but
> > > > it had
> > > > a special "no vibration" type of mirror mechanism and I was doing
> > > > micro-macro
> > > > with it on old postage stamps, coming out razor sharp. Tiny sections of
> > > > the
> > > > stamps.
> > > > The production of it stopped some time in the mid 90's?

>
> > > > I suspect these days, that is the norm on any higher-end camera body like
> > > > the
> > > > ones
> > > > you suggest, pro-sumer above consumer level. You could research it on
> > > > the
> > > > maker's
> > > > websites, as well. JAO.

>
> > > I'm looking at it for landscape photography. I used a D200 and couldn't
> > > activate the feature when only 2 bars were off the battery symbol. I've
> > > heard that the feature is disabled when the batteries are nearly dead
> > > but this is ridiculous. Older film bodies never limited photogs in this
> > > way ... it is almost like they are fixing a nonexistant problem.

>
> > The feature you need (ie locking up the mirror on the first press of
> > the shutter release, firing it on the second) is activated by turning
> > the drive mode selector to MUp (that's the ring below the three
> > buttons on the top left of the camera, the one you need to press a
> > button to unlock and which is used to select drive mode).

>
> > The thing that's disabled when your battery is less the 75% is the
> > sensor cleaning mode (called "mirror lock-up", as opposed to "mirror
> > up", I suppose). That does make sense, running out of battery while
> > your sensor is full of cleaning liquid and you're swabbing it isn't a
> > good idea.

>
> > Anyway, didn't the owner of that D200 you used know this? Strange.

>
> That explains everything. I should have read the manual myself. I
> suspect a lot of SLR users don't find a need for the feature so never
> try it.


I was just trying to say that the fact that he/she didn't know about
that feature implies that the sensor has never been cleaned!
Personally I just use a blower once every couple of weeks and haven't
had a dust problem in almost two years, so I assumed everybody did
something like that. Clearly not

>
> Thanks for explaining.


You're welcome.
 
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Paul Furman
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-03-2008
acl wrote:
> On Jan 3, 3:03 am, TH O <t...@tho.23.invalid> wrote:
>> In article
>> <(E-Mail Removed)>,
>>
>>
>>
>> acl <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> On Jan 3, 2:42 am, TH O <t...@tho.23.invalid> wrote:
>>>> In article <uXUej.33681$(E-Mail Removed)>,
>>>> "AAvK" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>> "TH O" <t...@tho.23.invalid> wrote in message
>>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>>> Does mirror lockup on both the Nikon D200 and D300 always stop
>>>>>> functioning when the battery is less than 3/4 full? Does the Canon 40D
>>>>>> mirror lockup function stop working before the batter dies?
>>>>>> Thanks.
>>>>> I don't think you'd need it anyway... I used to use a Canon F1n, the
>>>>> later
>>>>> version,
>>>>> which was a tank quality professional machine (except the stupid old
>>>>> fashioned
>>>>> horizontal-travel shutter curtains). No ML built into this body at all,
>>>>> but
>>>>> it had
>>>>> a special "no vibration" type of mirror mechanism and I was doing
>>>>> micro-macro
>>>>> with it on old postage stamps, coming out razor sharp. Tiny sections of
>>>>> the
>>>>> stamps.
>>>>> The production of it stopped some time in the mid 90's?
>>>>> I suspect these days, that is the norm on any higher-end camera body like
>>>>> the
>>>>> ones
>>>>> you suggest, pro-sumer above consumer level. You could research it on
>>>>> the
>>>>> maker's
>>>>> websites, as well. JAO.
>>>> I'm looking at it for landscape photography. I used a D200 and couldn't
>>>> activate the feature when only 2 bars were off the battery symbol. I've
>>>> heard that the feature is disabled when the batteries are nearly dead
>>>> but this is ridiculous. Older film bodies never limited photogs in this
>>>> way ... it is almost like they are fixing a nonexistant problem.
>>> The feature you need (ie locking up the mirror on the first press of
>>> the shutter release, firing it on the second) is activated by turning
>>> the drive mode selector to MUp (that's the ring below the three
>>> buttons on the top left of the camera, the one you need to press a
>>> button to unlock and which is used to select drive mode).
>>> The thing that's disabled when your battery is less the 75% is the
>>> sensor cleaning mode (called "mirror lock-up", as opposed to "mirror
>>> up", I suppose). That does make sense, running out of battery while
>>> your sensor is full of cleaning liquid and you're swabbing it isn't a
>>> good idea.
>>> Anyway, didn't the owner of that D200 you used know this? Strange.

>> That explains everything. I should have read the manual myself. I
>> suspect a lot of SLR users don't find a need for the feature so never
>> try it.

>
> I was just trying to say that the fact that he/she didn't know about
> that feature implies that the sensor has never been cleaned!
> Personally I just use a blower once every couple of weeks and haven't
> had a dust problem in almost two years, so I assumed everybody did
> something like that. Clearly not
>
>> Thanks for explaining.

>
> You're welcome.


BTW the D70 only has the sensor cleaning lockup, the D200 has the type
you use for tripod shots... and if I need to blow off the sensor when
the battery is a bit low, I shoot in bulb exposure & hold the shutter
since the blower doesn't risk the mirror slamming into it like a brush
or swab.
 
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Steve
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-04-2008
On Wed, 02 Jan 2008 21:44:33 -0800, Paul Furman <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>acl wrote:
>> On Jan 3, 3:03 am, TH O <t...@tho.23.invalid> wrote:
>>> In article
>>> <(E-Mail Removed)>,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> acl <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>> On Jan 3, 2:42 am, TH O <t...@tho.23.invalid> wrote:
>>>>> In article <uXUej.33681$(E-Mail Removed)>,
>>>>> "AAvK" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>> "TH O" <t...@tho.23.invalid> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>>>> Does mirror lockup on both the Nikon D200 and D300 always stop
>>>>>>> functioning when the battery is less than 3/4 full? Does the Canon 40D
>>>>>>> mirror lockup function stop working before the batter dies?
>>>>>>> Thanks.
>>>>>> I don't think you'd need it anyway... I used to use a Canon F1n, the
>>>>>> later
>>>>>> version,
>>>>>> which was a tank quality professional machine (except the stupid old
>>>>>> fashioned
>>>>>> horizontal-travel shutter curtains). No ML built into this body at all,
>>>>>> but
>>>>>> it had
>>>>>> a special "no vibration" type of mirror mechanism and I was doing
>>>>>> micro-macro
>>>>>> with it on old postage stamps, coming out razor sharp. Tiny sections of
>>>>>> the
>>>>>> stamps.
>>>>>> The production of it stopped some time in the mid 90's?
>>>>>> I suspect these days, that is the norm on any higher-end camera body like
>>>>>> the
>>>>>> ones
>>>>>> you suggest, pro-sumer above consumer level. You could research it on
>>>>>> the
>>>>>> maker's
>>>>>> websites, as well. JAO.
>>>>> I'm looking at it for landscape photography. I used a D200 and couldn't
>>>>> activate the feature when only 2 bars were off the battery symbol. I've
>>>>> heard that the feature is disabled when the batteries are nearly dead
>>>>> but this is ridiculous. Older film bodies never limited photogs in this
>>>>> way ... it is almost like they are fixing a nonexistant problem.
>>>> The feature you need (ie locking up the mirror on the first press of
>>>> the shutter release, firing it on the second) is activated by turning
>>>> the drive mode selector to MUp (that's the ring below the three
>>>> buttons on the top left of the camera, the one you need to press a
>>>> button to unlock and which is used to select drive mode).
>>>> The thing that's disabled when your battery is less the 75% is the
>>>> sensor cleaning mode (called "mirror lock-up", as opposed to "mirror
>>>> up", I suppose). That does make sense, running out of battery while
>>>> your sensor is full of cleaning liquid and you're swabbing it isn't a
>>>> good idea.
>>>> Anyway, didn't the owner of that D200 you used know this? Strange.
>>> That explains everything. I should have read the manual myself. I
>>> suspect a lot of SLR users don't find a need for the feature so never
>>> try it.

>>
>> I was just trying to say that the fact that he/she didn't know about
>> that feature implies that the sensor has never been cleaned!
>> Personally I just use a blower once every couple of weeks and haven't
>> had a dust problem in almost two years, so I assumed everybody did
>> something like that. Clearly not
>>
>>> Thanks for explaining.

>>
>> You're welcome.

>
>BTW the D70 only has the sensor cleaning lockup, the D200 has the type
>you use for tripod shots... and if I need to blow off the sensor when
>the battery is a bit low, I shoot in bulb exposure & hold the shutter
>since the blower doesn't risk the mirror slamming into it like a brush
>or swab.


The D200 also has the sensor cleaning lockup. It's in the Setup menu,
Mirror Lock-up.

Steve
 
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