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ASP.NET 2.0 / 3.5 / AJAX support for browsers other than IE

 
 
VR@MSDN.COM
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-16-2007
Hello,

I am a rookie web developer and faced with an important decision of choosing
the development platform and language for a brand new software my company is
about to build.

Whereas I am leaning towards ASP.NET simply because of my familiarity with
C#, a more important factor of compatibility comes to mind. The big question
is how ASP.NET 2.0, 3.5 and MS AJAX technology support Mozilla Firefox and
Safari.

I guess I am not looking for specifics as to which control or functionality
is supported and which is not (I will appreciate them though), but an
approximation of whether ASP.NET is the best platform to use when it comes to
playing with other major browsers.

Thank you in advance for any feedback.
VR

 
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Mark Fitzpatrick
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-16-2007
They all non-ie browser just fine. Since the ASP.Net server controls render
HTML, css, and javascript it's fairly cross-platform. The ajax library is a
client-side javascsript library, it just has server-side functionality to
aid the generation of the client-side events.

That said, one of the main problems most developers face cross-platform is
simple design issues. These are essentially the same for non-ASP.Net sites
as you need to craft your basic HTML and CSS in such a way that it will work
cross-browser.


--
Hope this helps,
Mark Fitzpatrick
Microsoft MVP - Expression

"(E-Mail Removed)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hello,
>
> I am a rookie web developer and faced with an important decision of
> choosing
> the development platform and language for a brand new software my company
> is
> about to build.
>
> Whereas I am leaning towards ASP.NET simply because of my familiarity with
> C#, a more important factor of compatibility comes to mind. The big
> question
> is how ASP.NET 2.0, 3.5 and MS AJAX technology support Mozilla Firefox and
> Safari.
>
> I guess I am not looking for specifics as to which control or
> functionality
> is supported and which is not (I will appreciate them though), but an
> approximation of whether ASP.NET is the best platform to use when it comes
> to
> playing with other major browsers.
>
> Thank you in advance for any feedback.
> VR
>


 
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VR@MSDN.COM
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-16-2007
Mark,

Thanks for the post. I was really hoping to hear something like that

Could you recommend a good book and/or other resources on the subject
cross-platform compatibility? I'd love to get a chance to learn on the
mistakes of others

Thanks,
VR

"Mark Fitzpatrick" wrote:

> They all non-ie browser just fine. Since the ASP.Net server controls render
> HTML, css, and javascript it's fairly cross-platform. The ajax library is a
> client-side javascsript library, it just has server-side functionality to
> aid the generation of the client-side events.
>
> That said, one of the main problems most developers face cross-platform is
> simple design issues. These are essentially the same for non-ASP.Net sites
> as you need to craft your basic HTML and CSS in such a way that it will work
> cross-browser.
>
>
> --
> Hope this helps,
> Mark Fitzpatrick
> Microsoft MVP - Expression
>
> "(E-Mail Removed)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Hello,
> >
> > I am a rookie web developer and faced with an important decision of
> > choosing
> > the development platform and language for a brand new software my company
> > is
> > about to build.
> >
> > Whereas I am leaning towards ASP.NET simply because of my familiarity with
> > C#, a more important factor of compatibility comes to mind. The big
> > question
> > is how ASP.NET 2.0, 3.5 and MS AJAX technology support Mozilla Firefox and
> > Safari.
> >
> > I guess I am not looking for specifics as to which control or
> > functionality
> > is supported and which is not (I will appreciate them though), but an
> > approximation of whether ASP.NET is the best platform to use when it comes
> > to
> > playing with other major browsers.
> >
> > Thank you in advance for any feedback.
> > VR
> >

>

 
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Mark Rae [MVP]
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-16-2007
"(E-Mail Removed)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...

> "Mark Fitzpatrick" wrote:
>
>> They all non-ie browser just fine. Since the ASP.Net server controls
>> render
>> HTML, css, and javascript it's fairly cross-platform. The ajax library is
>> a
>> client-side javascsript library, it just has server-side functionality to
>> aid the generation of the client-side events.
>>
>> That said, one of the main problems most developers face cross-platform
>> is
>> simple design issues. These are essentially the same for non-ASP.Net
>> sites
>> as you need to craft your basic HTML and CSS in such a way that it will
>> work
>> cross-browser.

>
> Could you recommend a good book and/or other resources on the subject
> cross-platform compatibility? I'd love to get a chance to learn on the
> mistakes of others


Cross-platform compatibility isn't really the issue - it's cross-browser
compatibility that you need to account for...

The problem here is mainly historical. From the mid 90s, IE has had the
lion's share of the browser market and it is only relatively recently that
FireFox and Safari have made any inroads into this. This has meant that lots
of web developers simply didn't care about any browser other than IE because
they didn't think it was worth the effort. It's not difficult to have a
certain amount of sympathy with this attitude - how many desktop developers
do you know who go out of their way to provide a Mac version of their apps,
let alone a Linux version...?

W3C is an independent body which provides standards for the web. But the
verb *provides* is the crux of the matter here - it can only *provide*
standards, because *enforcing* standards on the web is totally impossible
due to its fundamental architecture. Microsoft, to a greater or lesser
extent, ignored these standards completely right up to IE6, which remains
the least standards-compliant browser in active use today. To make matters
worse, of course, IE6 remains the most popular browser in use today
However, Microsoft have responded to the criticism of IE6 with IE7 which is
much more standards-compliant, though there's still a fair way to go yet...

So what's a web developer to do?

Firstly, develop against FireFox, not IE. Install FireFox on your
development box and set that as the default browser in Visual Studio.NET.

Secondly, make all your web apps standards-compliant. Choose either HTML4.01
or XHTML 1.0 Transitional. You can set this in Visual Studio.NET.

Thirdly, develop against FireFox but test against IE.

If your web apps are 100% compliant with either one of the standards above,
and function correctly in FireFox and IE, it's a pretty safe bet that they
will function correctly in all other modern browsers too...


--
Mark Rae
ASP.NET MVP
http://www.markrae.net

 
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VR@MSDN.COM
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-17-2007
Mark,

Thank you for the post.

Thank to you I regained my courage -- all of a sudden I feel I could
actually do it.

VR

"Mark Rae [MVP]" wrote:

> "(E-Mail Removed)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> > "Mark Fitzpatrick" wrote:
> >
> >> They all non-ie browser just fine. Since the ASP.Net server controls
> >> render
> >> HTML, css, and javascript it's fairly cross-platform. The ajax library is
> >> a
> >> client-side javascsript library, it just has server-side functionality to
> >> aid the generation of the client-side events.
> >>
> >> That said, one of the main problems most developers face cross-platform
> >> is
> >> simple design issues. These are essentially the same for non-ASP.Net
> >> sites
> >> as you need to craft your basic HTML and CSS in such a way that it will
> >> work
> >> cross-browser.

> >
> > Could you recommend a good book and/or other resources on the subject
> > cross-platform compatibility? I'd love to get a chance to learn on the
> > mistakes of others

>
> Cross-platform compatibility isn't really the issue - it's cross-browser
> compatibility that you need to account for...
>
> The problem here is mainly historical. From the mid 90s, IE has had the
> lion's share of the browser market and it is only relatively recently that
> FireFox and Safari have made any inroads into this. This has meant that lots
> of web developers simply didn't care about any browser other than IE because
> they didn't think it was worth the effort. It's not difficult to have a
> certain amount of sympathy with this attitude - how many desktop developers
> do you know who go out of their way to provide a Mac version of their apps,
> let alone a Linux version...?
>
> W3C is an independent body which provides standards for the web. But the
> verb *provides* is the crux of the matter here - it can only *provide*
> standards, because *enforcing* standards on the web is totally impossible
> due to its fundamental architecture. Microsoft, to a greater or lesser
> extent, ignored these standards completely right up to IE6, which remains
> the least standards-compliant browser in active use today. To make matters
> worse, of course, IE6 remains the most popular browser in use today
> However, Microsoft have responded to the criticism of IE6 with IE7 which is
> much more standards-compliant, though there's still a fair way to go yet...
>
> So what's a web developer to do?
>
> Firstly, develop against FireFox, not IE. Install FireFox on your
> development box and set that as the default browser in Visual Studio.NET.
>
> Secondly, make all your web apps standards-compliant. Choose either HTML4.01
> or XHTML 1.0 Transitional. You can set this in Visual Studio.NET.
>
> Thirdly, develop against FireFox but test against IE.
>
> If your web apps are 100% compliant with either one of the standards above,
> and function correctly in FireFox and IE, it's a pretty safe bet that they
> will function correctly in all other modern browsers too...
>
>
> --
> Mark Rae
> ASP.NET MVP
> http://www.markrae.net
>
>

 
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Scott Lloyd
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-18-2007
Microsoft built ASP.Net and the AJAX extensions with compatibility in mind.
Features built using something specific to modern browsers will even degrade
gracefully when possible (like async postbacks converting to full
postbacks).

Scott Lloyd
Lloyd Software

"(E-Mail Removed)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hello,
>
> I am a rookie web developer and faced with an important decision of
> choosing
> the development platform and language for a brand new software my company
> is
> about to build.
>
> Whereas I am leaning towards ASP.NET simply because of my familiarity with
> C#, a more important factor of compatibility comes to mind. The big
> question
> is how ASP.NET 2.0, 3.5 and MS AJAX technology support Mozilla Firefox and
> Safari.
>
> I guess I am not looking for specifics as to which control or
> functionality
> is supported and which is not (I will appreciate them though), but an
> approximation of whether ASP.NET is the best platform to use when it comes
> to
> playing with other major browsers.
>
> Thank you in advance for any feedback.
> VR
>


 
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Wolfing
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-19-2007
On Dec 18, 3:59 pm, "Scott Lloyd" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Microsoft built ASP.Net and the AJAX extensions with compatibility in mind.
> Features built using something specific to modern browsers will even degrade
> gracefully when possible (like async postbacks converting to full
> postbacks).
>
> Scott Lloyd
> Lloyd Software
>
> "(E-Mail Removed)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> > Hello,

>
> > I am a rookie web developer and faced with an important decision of
> > choosing
> > the development platform and language for a brand new software my company
> > is
> > about to build.

>
> > Whereas I am leaning towards ASP.NET simply because of my familiarity with
> > C#, a more important factor of compatibility comes to mind. The big
> > question
> > is how ASP.NET 2.0,3.5and MS AJAX technology support Mozilla Firefox and
> > Safari.

>
> > I guess I am not looking for specifics as to which control or
> > functionality
> > is supported and which is not (I will appreciate them though), but an
> > approximation of whether ASP.NET is the best platform to use when it comes
> > to
> > playing with other major browsers.

>
> > Thank you in advance for any feedback.
> > VR


I don't know, but just using some of the 2.0 AJAX controls in the
tookit without any changes, and I found that they would work in IE but
not in Firefox. Even with the standard AJAX controls, for example, I
spent hours trying to figure out why the login control wasn't working,
and suddenly I thought about trying the page in IE... it worked. I
hope they fixed those things in 3.5.
 
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